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TaiidanTomcat

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About TaiidanTomcat

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    Hopeless Recluse
  • Birthday 02/25/1983

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    the 5 oh fizzle

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  1. TaiidanTomcat

    F-35 news roundup

    Its still under contstruction. Buddy of mine in had to go to Norfolk to give his say in it. a few weeks ago. Theres a lot of moving parts.
  2. TaiidanTomcat

    F-35 news roundup

    This was one of the ideas behind the whole F-35B endeavor. Mix and match as needed. Flexibility, you may even add and subtract aircraft throughout the cruise. Its the "harrier Carrier" If you look at USS America, it doesn't even have a well deck its aviation only... "mini CVNS" if you will. ARGs are still pretty well protected because you have thousands of Marines, tanks, arty, and its a no joke big stick. its still a very serious asset. A CVN will bomb you, but an ARG will have people with guns kicking in your door, and hoisting flags everywhere... Besides if you're going to lose one, whats 6 more jets?
  3. TaiidanTomcat

    F-35 news roundup

    speak of the Devil, Via USNI: Even before the Mattis memo, the Navy and Marine Corps had taken steps to improve their strike fighter readiness. In addition to pouring funding into spare parts, engineering support, depot maintenance and other readiness-related funding accounts, the sea services also looked into other barriers to readiness. Navy and Marine Corps officials detailed for lawmakers their strategy for reducing Class C mishaps, which involve damage to aircraft or a non-fatal injury, that were frequently occurring during repair work or while towing aircraft, Rear Adm. Roy Kelley, commander of Naval Air Forces Atlantic, told lawmakers during a June 2018 hearing. However, even with such gains, lawmakers remain concerned the Navy is still taking risks in the way it manages strike fighter readiness, Rep. Vicky Hartzler (R-Mo.), the ranking member of the House Armed Services subcommittee on tactical air and land forces, said in her opening statement Thursday. “[The Navy] has an identified shortfall of 54 aircraft, which amounts to one carrier air wing,” Hartzler said. “We need to better understand what impacts this has to overall readiness and what we can we do to improve the situation from a modernization standpoint,” Hartzler said. The F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter program – which the Navy and Marine Corps are still in the early stages of incorporating into the fleet – has a high readiness rate for all three fighter variants, Vice Adm. Mat Winter, the F-35 program executive officer, said during Thursday’s hearing. “We’re on a trajectory to reach 80-percent capability by the end of the year,” Winter said. Currently, the F-35A variant used by the Air Force has an availability rate of 61 percent, the F-35B short take-off and vertical landing variant has an availability rate of 64 percent, and the F-35C carrier variant has an availability rate of 84 percent, Winter said. When F-35 squadrons deploy, Winter said they now bring spare parts packages with them. With those packages, Winter said, “those mission capability rates average between 65 and 85 percent.” Winter’s office has worked with to suppliers to build up spare part inventories at depots and on the flight line, Winter said. Now maintainers have the right parts on hand, so they don’t have to keep going back to the manufacturer to order more parts. The F-35 program is doing a better job of keeping maintainers stocked with parts such as canopies, blade shields and wingtips. And when possible, Winter said, flight line maintainers now have the authority to fix parts. “We can get spare parts to maintainers one of two ways – get new parts to flight lines, but also giving the authorities for maintainers to fix parts on the flight line,” Winter said. Plus, as the program has matured and is nearing full-rate production, Winter said the production line ironed out many of the problems that caused the first F-35s to require more maintenance. “The aircraft itself, lot over lot over lot, is getting more reliable,” Winter said. “Therefore, it doesn’t break as often, so therefore it’s more ready.” http://m.aviationweek.com/defense/podcast-behind-f-35-s-new-aerial-tricks?NL=AW-05&Issue=AW-05_20190404_AW-05_51&sfvc4enews=42&cl=article_2&utm_rid=CPEN1000002990714&utm_campaign=19096&utm_medium=email&elq2=46ce449c64f94ecea82172645d23cd46 More about Manuever^
  4. TaiidanTomcat

    Air Force officially hates F-15s now

    https://www.defensenews.com/air/2019/03/22/industrial-base-considerations-played-role-in-f-15x-decision/ its all about that base...
  5. TaiidanTomcat

    F-35 news roundup

    Wait until promotions hang on these numbers...
  6. TaiidanTomcat

    F-35 news roundup

    exactly, Most of the USMC's harriers are PMC because they don't bother to fix sidewinders and gunpods until its live ammo and dead bodies time. Numbers still seem funky to me...
  7. TaiidanTomcat

    F-35 news roundup

    Those numbers really don't tell me anything without context, but we have no idea what the hell they are measuring. They weren't even IOC until a month ago. How can you be "Full mission Capable" when youre not cleared for initial operation? or if theyre measuring certain upgrades or software blocks. Speaking of IOC a bunch of criteria has to be met in order to be cleared for IOC, as in the squadron has to show it functions and can fight. I asked Lt. Gen. Arnold Bunch, the top uniformed official for Air Force acquisition, how concerned the Air Force is that Lockheed Martin has not been able to improve fleet availability above 60 percent for three years. The Director of Operational Test and evaluation issued his annual report yesterday and that fact was the grimmest in the review of the F-35. “There was no improving trend in fleet aircraft availability….Fleet-wide average availability is below program target value of 60 percent and well below planned 80 percent needed for efficient conduct of IOT&E,” the report says. “The trend in fleet availability has been flat over the past 3 years; the program’s reliability improvement initiatives are still not translating into improved availability.” More broadly, Robert Behler’s report says that the “reliability and maintainability metrics defined in the JSF Operational Requirements Document are not meeting interim goals needed to reach requirements at maturity.” To his credit, Bunch addressed the question, although he had not been briefed on the DOTE final report. “I’m not going to duck this one,” he said, clearly indicating he had considered just that. “We are trying to get to that 80 percent number readiness rate for our combat coded aircraft,’ Bunch said. “We have a list of systems that are not performing as well as we want — the big drivers — and we are going to measure to see if we get the performance that we expect.” and for the USMC The F-35B's first combat strike was in Afghanistan in September, where the Marine pilots were flying close-air support missions, said Lt. Col. Kyle Shoop, VMFA-211's commanding officer. From there, they flew more than 50 days' worth of close-air support and defensive counter-air missions in Iraq and Syria. "Every day, [the pilots] were supporting over six hours of time in theater," Shoop said. The Marines were prepared for a higher-level fight had they been provoked by other actors in the region, he added. Their encounters with pilots from Russia, which is supporting Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's forces, were minimal though, he said. "We were aware they were airborne," Shoop said. "There are some established de-conflictions that are already set up between Russian and U.S. forces. They were all adhered to, but we were aware." The F-35Bs were able to give troops on the ground more information than would have been possible in the AV-8B Harrier jump jet, which the Joint Strike Fighter will eventually replace. Its sensors are better in poor weather, Shoop said. The Marines ended up flying the F-35B about twice as much as the Harrier flew on past deployments, Nelms said. "A conservative estimate is the F-35 flew 100 percent more hours on this deployment than a typical deployment for a Harrier squadron," he said. "When you consider that their readiness was 75 percent or better ... while doubling the amount of flight hours being flown, it's a real testament to the aircraft and the maintainers." LOLed And before people panic, you'd be shocked at how good 60 percent is these days comparatively
  8. TaiidanTomcat

    Air Force officially hates F-15s now

    It's pretty much OT here because there is no other way to spin the idea that the F-15X buy is going to compete againt F-35 funding one way or another. Not to mention the "5th gen or bust" weve been hearing for 20 years... So the Marines are saying 75 percent on a deployment with -211 which is better than every other USMC fighter and especially the Hornet and the USAF is saying 70 percent in some squadrons and a fleetwide average of 60 percent which is better than even the F-22
  9. TaiidanTomcat

    Air Force officially hates F-15s now

    Compared to what?? What are the numbers? The F-35B's first combat strike was in Afghanistan in September, where the Marine pilots were flying close-air support missions, said Lt. Col. Kyle Shoop, VMFA-211's commanding officer. From there, they flew more than 50 days' worth of close-air support and defensive counter-air missions in Iraq and Syria. "Every day, [the pilots] were supporting over six hours of time in theater," Shoop said. The Marines were prepared for a higher-level fight had they been provoked by other actors in the region, he added. Their encounters with pilots from Russia, which is supporting Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's forces, were minimal though, he said. "We were aware they were airborne," Shoop said. "There are some established de-conflictions that are already set up between Russian and U.S. forces. They were all adhered to, but we were aware." The F-35Bs were able to give troops on the ground more information than would have been possible in the AV-8B Harrier jump jet, which the Joint Strike Fighter will eventually replace. Its sensors are better in poor weather, Shoop said. The Marines ended up flying the F-35B about twice as much as the Harrier flew on past deployments, Nelms said. "A conservative estimate is the F-35 flew 100 percent more hours on this deployment than a typical deployment for a Harrier squadron," he said. "When you consider that their readiness was 75 percent or better ... while doubling the amount of flight hours being flown, it's a real testament to the aircraft and the maintainers."
  10. TaiidanTomcat

    Air Force officially hates F-15s now

    The Pentagon's Watchdog Is Investigating Whether the Acting Defense Secretary Boosted Boeing By W.J. Hennigan Updated: March 20, 2019 3:49 PM ET The Department of Defense Office of Inspector General confirmed it has launched an investigation into whether Acting Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan has violated any ethics rules by promoting his former employer Boeing while serving in the Trump Administration. The investigation comes a week after a government watchdog group, called Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW), wrote a nine-page complaint to the Pentagon’s inspector general urging the agency to scrutinize the relationship. At issue is whether Shanahan pushed the Pentagon to buy more Boeing-made F-15X fighter jets, which the Air Force does not want, and whether he criticized Boeing-rival Lockheed Martin Corp. during government meetings. http://time.com/5555186/patrick-shanahan-defense-ethics-probe/ Shouldn't have to wait years for teen fighters, when your selling point is the speed in which they'll be ready. Especially as the F-35 slog is finally over.
  11. TaiidanTomcat

    Air Force officially hates F-15s now

  12. TaiidanTomcat

    Air Force officially hates F-15s now

    FY2020 USAF Budget Doc: F-15EX "details" are just "airframe", no GFE, CFE, avionics, engines, etc. REC Flyway is $80mil but full Flyaway is $131 mil."The pre-decisional plan is for the first two aircraft ordered in FY20 to be taken from the existing production line and delivered approximately 2 years after contract award to support flight testing. The subsequent delivery of aircraft 3-8, also ordered in FY20, are expected approximately 3 to 3.5 years after contract award." https://www.saffm.hq.af.mil/FM-Resources/Budget/ These bad boys are READY NOW in 3 to 3.5 years!
  13. TaiidanTomcat

    Air Force officially hates F-15s now

    IT could be a huge problem if they get small fleet and the parts that are not compatible with the current Eagles are suddenly rare. They estimated between 80-90 percent common, which is great obviously but if suddenly they are a limited run those 20-10 percent parts may wipe out any savings or aircraft availability one as hoping for... I just can't imagine buying new F-4s in the mid 1990s. Mattis is being... I don't want to say blamed, but lets say "responsibled" for this idea seeing as he is now gone. so hes a fine scape goat. The ACTING SecDef is a Boeing guy of 30 years, and has the job only after Mattis Resigned over Syria, And "out of nowhere" and against what the SecAF has said these Boeing F-15s suddenly show up. Its already attracted the attention of Civilian Watch Dog Groups. One of my favorite phrases, and its ignored by nearly every organization I've ever worked for: "what accomplishes the mission is good, and what gets in the way of that is bad" I know that sounds ridiculously obvious, but you would be shocked how few organizations and humans actually do this. Its absolutely true that Teen fighters are still going to be around in the 2030s, but the idea is they are on the way out, and the numbers are shrinking along the way. The objective is to replace 4th gen with 5th gen. Buying more 4th gen gets in the way of that mission. SecAF already talked about the Ratios of 4th:5th Gen they are hoping for, and this once again makes the Ratios of their planned force structure move the needle the wrong way. We simply can't keep ordering "everything on the menu" forever.
  14. I think it's a sign of the times, everyone has a soapbox now, so people have to shout all the louder. We have a kind of "marketing inflation" "amazeballs" is a thing because "amazing" is not worth noticing. Click bait ruins everything. "Why movie X is the greatest super hero film in the history of all time." And "why movie X is the most godawful movie you're children will ever endure" It cant just be Movie X is very good or movie X is very bad. Hype backlash is a very real thing too
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