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gluefinger

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About gluefinger

  • Rank
    Canopy Polisher
  • Birthday 12/05/1962

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Indiana USA
  • Interests
    Civilian Prop Planes and Race Vehicles

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  1. Removing the gloss of the plastic will help coverage and color build up will happen faster. Scuff all surfaces with fine scotchbrite or water based abrasive cleaner, such as Ajax or Comet.
  2. They are all the same white. It is the sheen that is different.
  3. These are not the rubber backed photoetch?
  4. Laquer thinner on top of the nut or bolt. Let it soak.
  5. A gloss sky blue base coat I have found puts out a very nice bright tone and by varying your base colors, you can get by with just the aluminum shade of alclad instead of having a range of them. It can get rather expensive to collect. Alclad II printed instruction sheet suggested this method. Their website "how to" does not. Gloss white is also a stated suggestion for base color, but of course as you can imagine will leave a very pale look, although still very reflective. Practice all you can to get the most gloss first and play around with the three base colors. I use white plastic spoons for this. If you are fighting a pebble finish, add more thinners and dust it on until it glosses out. Your paint is drying before it hits the model. Change to a higher flow tip and needle if you can, and get that droplet size larger that's coming out of your brush. Placing a small box over your model immediately after spraying will help take care of the pebbles if you fail. The solvents under the flash drying of the paint will help smooth it out as it sits. Slow the drying time with it, and give it a chance to melt back a bit.
  6. Yes, Steven. They came out of the current Minicraft kits. The UV screen came to mind also. I have some really nice Modeller's of Japan chrome foil (the absolute best. amazing stuff. miles apart from bare metal foil.) but I am crazy about showing the interiors.
  7. I've always wondered if Correct-O-Type on the plastic film would work where you burnish the stuff off the film carrier.
  8. Sorry I responded from the sidebar notes and didn't realize what forum you were asking from.
  9. Bandit Hobby Design There is a pattern out there somewhere that shows you how to lay one out on flatstock to fold up for yourself, but sorry I cannot remember where I seen it. Good luck with your build :)
  10. Doc, Thanks for that link. It is good to see an aftermarket company offer something for these. That might come in handy. Whitey used the registration numbers sheet. Those are handy, especially with these. Getting back to painting the figures, I had saved a three part series on how to paint figures if anyone is interested. I'm not sure if I'll paint any people for mine but who knows. I started to study figure painting because of my car building. I have an F1 pit crew set from Tamiya I'll be having to paint. I haven't painted with a brush for a long time so maybe it will be fun. The Mooney looks great. I like the paint scheme you chose, Whitey. That bleed under problem can be cured by brushing a coat of Future floor wax down first. It's clear so let it bleed under if it wants to, it is only sealing for the paint. Masking over panel lines is always iffy on the outcome. Either way, yours turned out fine. People looking do not realize how small these planes are to have to work with. A 1/48 warplane seems three times the size of these.
  11. Roll out some Milliput and run a piece of woven nylon cloth over it. You will have to put it in place before it hardens and it will be hard to handle without wiping out the impression but it's possible.
  12. Woody, Please type in your mailing address exactly how it should look and I will cut you a piece and send you it. I have more than I will use. David

  13. Anytime. I forgot to add the link. Testors paints has a glow in the dark color set of paints. They work okay, I've bought a set before just to play around with. I used it to paint dash knobs on car models. Gives a nice effect for that. You have to start with white first though. I just went to their website and it looks like they have stopped offering the paint set but I've seen them online in hobby stores. Just so you are not confused, the glow in the dark sheet I posted is a waterslide type of decal. Others were talking about the thick automotive kind of stickers I think. Microscale Decals
  14. Microscale has a glow in the dark sheet. It's thick also. I'm not sure if it is what you want. It glows a slight greenish color. Not very strong.
  15. Great to see your reply, Andrew. I found a reference to help supplement the people painting guide. :lol: Here's the famous painting guide those out of the circle. The windows are a BIG drawback. If used, there's not much sense on spending too much time on the interior. I've even thought of just gluing the windows into all of them, putty the seams and paint them blue like you see on all the mahogany wood models. Decals are a problem, but now Minicraft re-issued a couple so that helps. The problem is with the older kits (Mooney and Aero Subaru) that we probably will not see new decals come along. I scanned the Mooney and the Aero Subaru decals and cleaned them up with a photoshop program thinking I might try printing them. In all my searching of thousands of pictures, I've only found one picture that represents the color scheme included in any of the kits and its the Beech.
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