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Wolfman_63

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About Wolfman_63

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    https://www.davidsscalemodels.com/

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  1. This weekly update for the A-10 Thunderbolt II covers the power cart and most of the weapons. So the Hasegawa accessory kit came with two carts. The A/M32A-60A generator and a TTU-228/E Hydraulic test stand. I used the TTU-228 as it was large enough to hold the 9V battery. The cart was detailed with the wires and hoses that came with the kit. The top panel of the cart sits in between the side rails so it kind of clips in. I had to extend it to match the modification I did to the cart. It was then painted and decals added. Then a final coat of matte clear coat was sprayed. I then assembled the
  2. The A-10 Thunderbolt II is heading into the final stages of the build. The aircraft was painted and the custom decals to match the combat simulator scheme were added. The Master Model was then assembled and installed. This accessory set also comes with a brass pitot tube for the wing. The hole in the wing was too large for the brass one so I filled the hole and re-drilled it the correct size. I was searching around the internet and stumbled upon a fellow modeler who used a glow-in-the-dark paint that he used for the formation lights (nicknamed “Slime Lights”). I looked up paints and found
  3. This week the wing tip lights were placed. I made an optic coupler to go from a PICO sized LED into a .5mm fiber optic line. One wing has a red LED and one has a green LED. Then the fun part, the wings and tail assembly need to be installed before the fuselage halves so the wiring and optic lines could be routed properly. I added weight to the node area so it will sit on the landing gear correctly then carefully put the fuselage together. The main gear was then detailed and installed and the engine assembly was built up, painted, detailed and exhaust was weathered. Once installed on the fusel
  4. Let there be light! This week’s work on the Thunderbolt II is installing the aircraft lights. Starting with the navigation lights there are five locations. The locations are the aft of the fuselage, each side of the tails, the dorsal light and the belly light. The kit provides a clear lens for the tail which is 1mm in diameter. So to start I drilled a 1mm hole all the way into the fuselage cavity. The clear lens was placed and then a 1mm fiber optic line was placed against it. For the belly light a 1mm hole was drilled and a piece of styrene stock was added to provide strain relief. I then us
  5. This week on the A-10 Thunderbolt II I detailed and assembled the cockpit. I completed the details on the instrument panel and the side panels. I decided used a QuickBoost resin ejection seat as the kit seat was very incorrect. I then dug thru my 1/48 figures and found a very good detailed pilot. The pilot was painted to match the pilot used in the simulator. I made the squadron arm patch and helmet logo decals using the artwork from the simulator and painted the helmet red with tiger stripes to match as well. While the pilot was drying, I added some photo etch details to the nose wheel strut
  6. For this next build I will be using the Tamiya 1/48 A-10A Thunderbolt II and doing a custom scheme as well as illuminating the aircraft. This is a commissioned work for a friend that flies this A-10 in the online flight simulator at the Digital Combat Simulator (DCS) website. The build will be detailed with Eduard photo etch, Eduard Brassin weapons (CBU-97’s, CBU-105’s, and Mk.84’s) and a Master Model gun for the nose. I will also be adding a M32A-60A Generator Unit which is part of the Hasegawa 1/48 US Ground Crew A set (currently on order) this will be used to hold a battery to power the LED
  7. The X-47B is now finished! First I need to bring up another issue. As I was applying decals a fellow modeler commented on one of the Facebook groups that the “Beware of Blast” decals were misspelled. I had already put the decals on the aircraft. So I looked at them and they say “Be Were of Blast”. They were carefully removed and I made my own with the correct spelling. Lastly I used some clear sprue trees and made the wingtip lights. These were shaped, sanded and polished. I trimmed the molded in one and put the clear ones on and painted them with Tamiya clear red and clear green paints.
  8. This week’s update on the X-47B UCAS covers the detailing of the bays. After I use wire for the cables and hydraulic lines I used some styrene rods for the large hoses. For the orange hose I used foil tape for the clamps. I used some black vinyl tape and foil tape to make the hose connector on each one. Towards the aft I sleeved the shaped styrene rod with a braided sleeve and foil tape for the connectors. I assembled, painted and applied decals to the JDAM bombs. The decals that come with the kit had the white base slightly off register from the colors. The decals are also a little on the th
  9. That would be in 2012 when both AV-1 and AV-2 were being tested in Pax River for electronic warfare and when we did the carrier testing. In 2015 AV-2 had working bomb bays and refueling capabilities. The refueling testing was done around April 2015. We then completed all the primary testing and started getting ready for the next phase but the program ended in early 2016 just before we could start testing the strike capabilities.
  10. My next build is the 1/48 Freedom Models X-47B US Navy UCAS. This is an Unmanned Combat Air System (UCAS) built by Northrop Grumman. It is essentially a semi-autonomous limited combat aircraft with two weapons bays. It is designed for use on an aircraft carrier to supply reconnaissance and identify targets for the air wing. With its stealth and ordinance capability it can take out a target that could be an immediate threat. It can also be refueled in the air for extended range. Only two flying demonstrators were built. Since there is no “cockpit” for a pilot to sit in, I decided to sup
  11. I have finished the Mohawk. This was a difficult kit to build. The fit requires a lot of work especially the canopy sections. The decals were also difficult to get them to sit down. They did not soften easily with decal set/solvents. Even with a base coat of Future they did not adhere or conform well to the surface details very well. The photo etch and resin accessories worked and fit well. If you build one of these the instructions state to use 19 grams, you need closer to 24 grams to keep it from sitting on the tails. Aside from the difficult issues it is a good representation of a unique ai
  12. This week I am getting closer to finishing the OV-1C Mohawk. I started by detailing the fuselage with photo etch accessories. On the bottom of the fuselage is a loop antenna. The kit antenna was difficult to separate from the tree due to how thin it was. It broke in two different places. I placed the pieces on a piece of tape the used some 32 gauge wire and made my own. I cut the mounts for the for the kit antenna and attached them to the fuselage then drilled a hole to fit the new wire antenna. With all the wings attached and landing gear mounted I placed the aircraft on the gear. As expected
  13. The build continues on the OV-1C Mohawk. The first thing I did was to detail the nose gear bay with more photo etch so I could install the cockpit/nose gear assembly into the fuselage. Once done, I was able to assemble the fuselage together. The instructions call out to add 19 grams of weight to the nose so the model will sit on the gear rather than its tail. I actually added about 22 grams. Only 15 grams fit in the nose so I added the rest on the sides of the nose gear bay between the bay and fuselage wall. I then began work on the wings. The first step was to cut out the entire main gear ba
  14. For my next build I will be building the Roden 1/48 OV-1C Mohawk. I will be detailing it with Eduard photo etch for the cockpit, exterior, and undercarriage as well as Quick Boost resin accessories like the exhaust, accurate propellers, and accurate scoops. This is one of the unique aircraft that you rarely see them built in scale models. Roden makes three versions in 1/48 the A, the C, and the D. I chose the C as it was the more widely used version during the Viet Nam war. The Mohawk's mission includes observation, artillery spotting, air control, emergency resupply, naval target spot
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