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nfiler

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    1/72nd Modern U. S. Military and Firebombers.

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  1. John, What is your point here? The book is what it is. it was published ten years ago and is still the only published reference oh the H-21 that I am aware of. What you say is all true, but there are always the could have, should have, would have stuff that happens after something is done. I found it very helpful in my drawing efforts and modeling as well. I am not saying it is perfect, obviously it is not. But at something like $18 it will allow you to know far more than not buying it.
  2. I have a copy of the book and while I would agree that it could have been better, it does cover the subject in considerable detail and the photos are generally pretty decent. The spelling errors are always a problem with self published stuff like this. Yeah, a good editor sure would have helped, but they also add to the cost and time involved. Helicopter subjects don't sell like Mustangs and 109s so cost probably was a serious consideration for the authors. If your interested in this bird, then you should have this book. Norm
  3. Lockheed F-104

    Well, that is a horse on me. Just looked up the William Tell winners and guess what? Chris is right. I left the Air Force in 1960 and while I was there TAC could not play in the ADC competition. We always figured we were better than those ADC guys and maybe the win in '62 proves it. &>) Norm
  4. Lockheed F-104

    Chris, I really doubt if this bird won at William Tell. The pilot might have but not in that bird. The 479th TAC fighter Group was a Tactical Air Command organization and thus not eligible to participate in an ADC event. 914 was assigned to the 434th when I was at George. Another thing you might reconsider is the wing pylons did NOT carry AIM 9 Sidewinders. The only thing we carried there was tanks. Later in VN they used those pylons to carry dumb bombs. I would also take exception to the comments regarding fuel and range. With air-to-air refueling range wasn't a big issue. Like every other strike fighter in VN , tankers supported the strike both coming and going. Without those tankers nobody was going downtown. We flew about the same cycle with the F-104Cs as we had with the previous F-100C. Fuel is always in short supply no matter what you're flying. Probably the only guys that never worry about it are the tanker guys. Everybody else sweats the fuel as soon as he unplugs from the tanker. Norm Filer
  5. Monogram F-104

    And will add that 906 was originally a 434th (Red) bird. When the 476th was established it became one of their birds and sported the slightly metallic Blue trim. All the markings were removed in Spain during the winter of '59-60 when TAC headquarter mandated removal of all individual markings and added the TAC emblem and lightning bolts.
  6. Monogram F-104

    Don't know anything about the G models, they were after my time at George, But I can tell you that the anti glare panels on all the 479th birds were Green. Norm Filer
  7. New 1/72 Scale B-45 Kit in 2017

    Considering no one has ever seen the kit yet, how is one to answer this? The only other kit of the B-45 in 72nd is the terrible Much Twice thingy. Even a lame effort by Valom would be better than that. Norm
  8. F-104C Starfighter and AIM-9 missiles

    I was in the 479th from 1956-1960. The first two years with F-100Cs. We transitioned to the F-104C starting in Oct. '58 and were the only TAC outfit to fly that bird. While the AIM-9 center line pylon was capable of carrying two missiles,it was NOT USED. It was tried only once and not used again. When we deployed to Spain to fly air defense the belly pylons were not even included in the fly away kits. Until Viet Nam, the only thing the center line pylon was used for was nuclear shapes (Mk 28) and the practice bomb dispenser. The 479th did not have a nuclear mission assigned so we did not actually carry live nukes. In Spain, where we flew air defense during the day and in good weather only, we flew with AIM- 9Bs on the tip and no pylons on either the wing or fuselage. We also flew a lot of training missions during that time. Usually they were flown with tanks on both the wing tips and pylons. The refueling boom was almost always installed.
  9. Thunderbirds FS Color -

    Red FS11136 Gunze 327 White FS17875 Gunze 316 Blue FS15044 Gunze 326
  10. 1/48 CF-104 Starfighter LEM Decals #48.26

    Tony, If the bond between the paper and images has been broken, it won't make any difference what you do with them. The only solution is to rebond with something in the way of a clear coat. The advantage of the Microscale Clear Decal coating is it is quick, easy to apply and dries almost instantly. Yes, I think Dave (Leading Edge) was aware of the problem. I also am pretty sure he solved it with later products. But I don't think anybody but him knows which are good and which are not.
  11. 1/48 CF-104 Starfighter LEM Decals #48.26

    Over the years, I have had several problems like this with Dave's decals. The problem is uneven expansion/contraction between the paper and ink.This often results in fracturing of the images on the paper. The solution is really pretty simple. Just overcoat the decals with a couple coats of Microscale liquid decal film. Of course this means you now have to trim around each item, but the decal thickness will be minimal. The Microscale liquid decal film is alcohol based and you can literally slop it on, smooth it out a bit with a broad brush and it will dry flawlessly in about two minutes. Great stuff! This is not unique to Dave's stuff. Older decals that have been around for a while and maybe were exposed to a range of humidity and temperatures often have this happen. Norm
  12. Help with F-86D Markings

    Probably the 440th FIS. I say probably because those markings were also applied to the 496th and 526th FIS also. The Yellow markings were apparently removed in 1956. They were an USAFE organization in Germany.
  13. Spray Booth w/ Lacquer Thinner

    I think this whole spark proof fan thing is highly overrated. A while back I actually loaded my air brush with lacquer thinner, held my mini butane torch in front of the air brush at about 18 inches and started spraying. The only thing that happened is a eventually blew the torch out. I suspect the amount of spraying you would need to do in a very small space would gas you long before it blew up. Spray cans put out a lot more paint than our modeling air brushes, but I doubt if explosion is as much of an issue as the exposure to all those fumes. I think even just an ordinary fan placed near an open window is better than nothing.
  14. B-29 Flaps

    Flaps and gear doors on the Mustang are hydraulic. To prevent over pressuring the system due to solar heating that could damage seals, the hydraulic release handle on the lower right hand side of the instrument sub panel (behind the stick) was pulled after shut down. As the label sez, this released pressure in the system and as a result the gear bay doors and flaps would slowly bleed down.This could also occur if the a/c had a leaky hydraulic system. As someone mentioned, the B-29/B-50/C/KC-97 all had electric motors that drove a jack screw to raise and lower the flaps. Thus no bleed down. They had to be raised or lowered intentionally.
  15. B-29 Flaps

    Chris, No, it would not be at all common. Flaps increase lift, allowing quicker take offs and slower approach speeds. Once on the ground on landing, that increased lift works against you by keeping the weight off the wheels, thus not allowing the brakes to work their thing. They also tend to get dinged up by rocks and stuff thrown up into the flaps. So the flaps are usually raised on roll out and left retracted on shut down. With big birds they also are a great head cracker if in the lowered position. On airplanes like the Mustang, with hydraulic flaps they tended to bleed down.
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