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TheRealMrEd

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About TheRealMrEd

  • Rank
    Tenax Sniffer (Open a window!)
  • Birthday 04/06/1944

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Marietta, GA
  • Interests
    1/72 US Military airplanes.
    Park Flyer R/C.

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  1. Thanks Rob, I may have to go that route. Meantime, I've ordered some 1/32 scale 500 pounder, and I'll see whether they can be massaged... Ed
  2. Stefan, Any chance you could measure the overall length and diameter of one of those. Might give me an idea of what I'd need... Ed
  3. Nice work, Stephan! Were those bombs 1//72 scale? I'm looking for smaller poundage bombs from the larger scales, something that is near to the sizes given above, to represent a 2000 lb bomb. Ed
  4. Hello, I've been looking for WWII (although stocks were used until the 1960's) AMN66 2000 lb bombs in 1/72 scale. As far as I can find, no one makes any, nor do I know of a kit where any have been provided. I was wandering whether anyone out there might know of a near-sized smaller type bomb in 1/48 or 1/32 scale? As near as I can find, the bomb I'm looking for would have an L.O.A. of real 90.4", which in 1/72 works out to 1-7/16" or 34.5mm. The length of the bomb body only is 70.00" in real life, or 1-1/8" or 21.5mm. The diameter of the bomb body is 23.3 inches in real life or just a hair over 5/16" or 8.5mm or thereabouts. What I am trying to do is substitute on of the larger scales' smaller bombs for the 1/72 2000 pounder. It looks like this (not to scale): Appreciate any ideas or leads, as I need two of these... Ed
  5. FWIW, the Cutting Edge tanks measure up as follows: L.O.A. for the tank only is 3-5/8" exactly. This makes the tank a scale 21 ft. 6 inches LOA. Pylon straight lines lengths (A-B and C-D) are exactly the same at 2-1/8" Tank diameter at front arrow is 15/32", tapering to 15/64" diameter at the rear arrow. I have no idea which set is correct... Ed
  6. As long as the rules will simply allow building two different kits of the same aircraft type -- different kit manufacturers for instance, I'll enter, in 1/72 scale of course! I have a few pair of kits that I'd like to do a comparison build on, but please don;t restrict it to old vs new for example -- I've got plenty of old ones I'd like to build, some of which there ARE NO new kits... Ed
  7. Just a tip for all the MM users with stuck bottle caps -- get an electric heat gun type paint remover. Here's one from AMAZON 5 - 10 seconds of heat, then use a pair of pliers because the metal lids will be hot, and the lid comes right off. Been doing it for years. Also works with Alclad II plastic lids, just use heat for shorter tie period. Ed
  8. Hi JP, As you might suspect, my F-35B has long since been finished. I do think however, that it would be good to post those pictures here for other modelers yet to come, particularly those working in larger scales than my 1.72nd effort. Thanks for offering them... Ed
  9. I'd be interested, but make it just two kits comparison, less the "new" vs "old" label. Ed
  10. Hi Dave, It really all depends upon how bad and where and on what, and how you're going to finish the model. For really bad gaps on regular plastic models, I'd use plastic sprue or card, glued down with a generously applied HOT liquid cement, such as Weld-on #3. This is best for surfaces to be re-scribed after sanding. For more moderate needs, try Bondo Glazing and Spot Putty, available at your local auto part dealer (and elsewhere) because it feather edges perfectly, and does not pin hole, as do many other fillers -- plus, it's cheap, compared to most others. For very light filling such as tiny lines at wing roots or around canopies, I like to use Perfect Plastic Putty, which can be put on and smoothed with water, usually requiring no sanding at all. Sadly it is not sturdy enough for major repairs, or it would probably be my first choice everywhere. These are just overall rules for how I do it. If you could post some pictures or at least a specific description of your problem areas, I'm sure that you'll get many other solutions offered up here! Ed
  11. Hi Curt, I use the Aqua Gloss over BMF (and other) finishes, shooting first just where the decals go on. After decals, another coat of Aqua Gloss over the decals and overall, then weathering, etc. Depending upon the desired finish, I'll then topcoat overall with any of the Alclad II clear finishes, including dead flat. This gives me good results. Over Alclad II Polished Aluminum and decals: This one used Aqua Gloss as described above finished with Matt Alclad II overall, and Alclad II Light Sheen clear over the de-icer boots: The latter coming soon to a Gallery article near you... Ed
  12. My paint booth is 28" wide, `9" tall and 18" deep, made of white-painted (house paint) plywood. It runs an old 80 CFM bathroom fan, behind two layers of cheapie household a/c filters. I just prop up spare pieces of cardboard, some brown, some white, salvaged from various shipping boxes, to test spray pattern and thinners on, then discarded when no longer usable. If you have an adequate fan, the paint should never hit the walls of the paint booth. If you don't have a fan at all, then I second the Melamine surface noted above, as it's pretty much impervious to most model paints, and if not, who cares? After all, it's inside the paint booth... Ed
  13. That would make an interesting pairing with the Fiat (91?) that the Army was looking at for close air support, back in the day when then air force wanted only to play with nukes and be all strategic. Congress finally decided that the Navy could take care of it's own, including the Marines, and the Air Force would take care of tactical air missions and close air support for the Army, and the Army would end up flying only light observation aircraft and helicopters. Of course, there has been a little mission creep since... Ed
  14. Thanks, Cajun21, It was indeed a labor --repeat-- labor of love! Ed
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