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Tab V aircraft shelter


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  • 2 weeks later...
That's probably it, but you need to be aware that the shelter itself is only 1/100th scale, while the Typhoon and ground equipment are 1/72nd. :)

The shelter looks smallish, but perhaps German shelters were smaller than USAFE shelters?

AFIAK, USAFE built two sizes of shelters, an early type that could house an F-4 but had to be revised to house an F-15, and a later type that could take two A-7's side by side.

What I mean to say is that compared to the later USAFE shelter, the Revell model is way off scale, but perhaps not when compared to the early type. A comparison with a real Luftwaffe shelter would answer this question completely, of course.

Rob

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The shelter looks smallish, but perhaps German shelters were smaller than USAFE shelters?

AFIAK, USAFE built two sizes of shelters, an early type that could house an F-4 but had to be revised to house an F-15, and a later type that could take two A-7's side by side.

What I mean to say is that compared to the later USAFE shelter, the Revell model is way off scale, but perhaps not when compared to the early type. A comparison with a real Luftwaffe shelter would answer this question completely, of course.

Rob

It was the early type that was at Ramstein it housed one F-4, it was tight , do you know wher I could get some info ,as in height ,width, and length . I want to make one as accuratly as possible.

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It was the early type that was at Ramstein it housed one F-4, it was tight , do you know wher I could get some info ,as in height ,width, and length . I want to make one as accuratly as possible.

The best idea I can come up with is to measure one at Bitburg or perhaps Hahn. Bitburg is now a business area under development:

Flugplatz Bitburg

I seem to remember that there were small and large shelters at Bitburg. Perhaps the people behind the website can help?

Rob

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The best idea I can come up with is to measure one at Bitburg or perhaps Hahn. Bitburg is now a business area under development:

Flugplatz Bitburg

I seem to remember that there were small and large shelters at Bitburg. Perhaps the people behind the website can help?

Rob

Thanks Rob I hope I can get something going

Phil

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Here's some info....

USAFE TAB VEE--24-feet radius semicircular arch, 48 feet wide by 100.8 feet long, front closure prow shaped, vertically hinged, recessed door.

First Generation Aircraft Shelter (TAB VEE Modified). 24-feet radius semicircular arch, 48 feet wide by 100.8 feet long, front closure prow shaped, laterally opening, external flush door.

Second Generation Aircraft Shelter. 29.4-feet double-radius, pseudoelliptical arch, 82 feet wide by 124 feet long, vertical reinforced concrete panel, laterally opening, sliding, external flush door.

Third Generation Aircraft Shelter. 27.4-feet double-radius, pseudoelliptical arch, 70.8 feet wide by 120 feet long, vertical reinforced concrete panel, laterally opening, sliding, external flush door. Personnel door at one side with barricade.

Korean TAB VEE. 24-feet radius semicircular arch, 48 feet wide by 100.8 feet long, open front. Exhaust port in rear wall protected only by a blast deflector barricade (otherwise identical to USAFE TAB VEE). When hardened doors are installed, consider these shelters as TAB VEE Modified.

Korean Flow-Through--Constructed from third generation drawing but omits front door, back wall, and personnel door, 70.8 feet wide by 120 feet long, 27.4-feet double-radius, pseudoelliptical arch.

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Here's some info....

USAFE TAB VEE--24-feet radius semicircular arch, 48 feet wide by 100.8 feet long, front closure prow shaped, vertically hinged, recessed door.

First Generation Aircraft Shelter (TAB VEE Modified). 24-feet radius semicircular arch, 48 feet wide by 100.8 feet long, front closure prow shaped, laterally opening, external flush door.

Second Generation Aircraft Shelter. 29.4-feet double-radius, pseudoelliptical arch, 82 feet wide by 124 feet long, vertical reinforced concrete panel, laterally opening, sliding, external flush door.

Third Generation Aircraft Shelter. 27.4-feet double-radius, pseudoelliptical arch, 70.8 feet wide by 120 feet long, vertical reinforced concrete panel, laterally opening, sliding, external flush door. Personnel door at one side with barricade.

Korean TAB VEE. 24-feet radius semicircular arch, 48 feet wide by 100.8 feet long, open front. Exhaust port in rear wall protected only by a blast deflector barricade (otherwise identical to USAFE TAB VEE). When hardened doors are installed, consider these shelters as TAB VEE Modified.

Korean Flow-Through--Constructed from third generation drawing but omits front door, back wall, and personnel door, 70.8 feet wide by 120 feet long, 27.4-feet double-radius, pseudoelliptical arch.

Thanks for the great info that is going to help a great deal

Phil

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  • 5 months later...

Before Revell of Germany offered that Aircraft Shelter another German company by the name of Preiser was selling pretty much the same shelter as a kit in whatever scale Preiser was making models. They were smaller than the Roco brand miniatures and definitely not HO scale.

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  • 1 month later...

Some time ago I started to build my own tab vee in 1/48 scale. Although my project is now on hold, I recently discovered the following web page which gives some idea about the double corrugated sheet inside the shelter. I hope it helps. Just click on the second button under the "HOME" button on the left side. You'll see the english link from then on.

double corrugated sheet

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  • 1 month later...
  • 6 months later...
  • 3 months later...

I was stationed at Hahn AB 1977 - 1979. The tab-V's are like home to me. Sad to see the pics of them being overtaken by underbrush. There is on tab-V there that probably still has the tip of one of my fingers mashed into the concrete from a cold and snowy night when I was driving an MJ-1 "Jammer" with a 500lb Snakeye bomb. The transmission slipped and slammed the Jammer into the wall... with my hand in between! Oh man! That was a long, long night. Thank God for the freezing cold and the hash, or it would have been even worse. I've not been back to Hahn since January 6, 1979. I've been told it is a commercial airport now.

Based on your pics, I assume some of the old base "stuff" still remains?

Lots of good... and not-so-good memories from that place. :thumbsup:

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 1 year later...

Here's some info....

USAFE TAB VEE--24-feet radius semicircular arch, 48 feet wide by 100.8 feet long, front closure prow shaped, vertically hinged, recessed door.

First Generation Aircraft Shelter (TAB VEE Modified). 24-feet radius semicircular arch, 48 feet wide by 100.8 feet long, front closure prow shaped, laterally opening, external flush door.

Second Generation Aircraft Shelter. 29.4-feet double-radius, pseudoelliptical arch, 82 feet wide by 124 feet long, vertical reinforced concrete panel, laterally opening, sliding, external flush door.

Third Generation Aircraft Shelter. 27.4-feet double-radius, pseudoelliptical arch, 70.8 feet wide by 120 feet long, vertical reinforced concrete panel, laterally opening, sliding, external flush door. Personnel door at one side with barricade.

Korean TAB VEE. 24-feet radius semicircular arch, 48 feet wide by 100.8 feet long, open front. Exhaust port in rear wall protected only by a blast deflector barricade (otherwise identical to USAFE TAB VEE). When hardened doors are installed, consider these shelters as TAB VEE Modified.

Korean Flow-Through--Constructed from third generation drawing but omits front door, back wall, and personnel door, 70.8 feet wide by 120 feet long, 27.4-feet double-radius, pseudoelliptical arch.

Hi,

It's with this informations I release my TAB Vee

second generation

p1000516.jpg

First generation

p1000510.jpg

Edited by philippe.chauvin
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  • 7 years later...

I looked again at the photos, and to my surprise there is no steel reinforcement (rebar) visible before the concrete is poured. The pouring casings are already mostly installed, but no rebar. Yet in the one photo where the shelter's exhaust is missing, I see lots of rebar sticking out vertically. I'm confused 😗

 

Rob

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  • 2 months later...

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