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Triarius

Mr. Surfacer 1200

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I've never used any of the Mr. Surfacer products (and I'd rather not, but I've encountered a problem that only they may be able to solve).

Can Mr. Surfacer 1200 be applied with a brush, or must it be airbrushed?

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It can be applied either way Triarius. I apply with a brush over seams after I've used putty and sanded down, as it will blend the seam that much better when sanded down. Likewise, it can be applied with your airbrush by diluting with lacquer thinner. By the way, what was the problem you encountered with this product?

Greg

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I've never used any of the Mr. Surfacer products (and I'd rather not, but I've encountered a problem that only they may be able to solve).

Can Mr. Surfacer 1200 be applied with a brush, or must it be airbrushed?

Once you try it, you'll (probably) love it. As Goheen stated, can be brushed or sprayed. 500 may be better for fixing things, I use 1200 for an overall prime coat, and 500 for fixing errors. Great stuff! Can clean brushes and AB with alcohol too.

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It can be applied either way Triarius. I apply with a brush over seams after I've used putty and sanded down, as it will blend the seam that much better when sanded down. Likewise, it can be applied with your airbrush by diluting with lacquer thinner. By the way, what was the problem you encountered with this product?

Greg

Thanks, Greg,

Problem is not with Mr. Surfacer—with a Grand Phoenix :) :thumbsup: disaster (Sold as a kit, it more resembles a collection of odd parts made of highly variable materials.) The plastic is nonuniform, and portions are still bleeding plasticizer. Interferes with the bond of acrylic paint even after I cleaned the surface (that's surgically clean) multiple times. I'm hoping the Mr. Surfacer will solve the problem.

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No problem at all Sir. And sorry to hear about the Grand Phoenix disaster....that's truly too bad and sounds pretty frustrating too. Nice tip from blunce above as well as I didn't realize you could clean with alcohol.

Greg

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Once you try it, you'll (probably) love it. As Goheen stated, can be brushed or sprayed. 500 may be better for fixing things, I use 1200 for an overall prime coat, and 500 for fixing errors. Great stuff! Can clean brushes and AB with alcohol too.

If it's alcohol soluble, you might be right. I dislike using enamels and modern lacquers, having been overexposed when I worked in the paint industry (before OSHA meant a damned thing). When people talk about using "lacquer thinner," I think of all the other solvents besides the traditional alcohol that are usually in that product, and figure it (Mr. Surfacer) contains those nasties I prefer to avoid. (And yes, I have adequate ventilation, as those who have endured my diatribes :thumbsup: on safe handling of hobby materials know… :) )

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What did you do in the paint industry? I've been a painter in some form since '92 (residential, commercial, industrial, marine) Been around lot's of nasties.

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That's really good to know as I've been trying to get away from enamels and lacquers for health reasons but darned if Gunze didn't just pull the plug on that one when they stopped shipping Mr. Hobby Aqueous paints to the States. Tell me, what was the reason for doing that in the first place?...I mean, I'd truly think between Mr. Hobby and it's replacement now, Mr. Color, that the first of these would have been a healthier alternative.

Greg

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What did you do in the paint industry? I've been a painter in some form since '92 (residential, commercial, industrial, marine) Been around lot's of nasties.

R&D technician, Formulator-chemist, materials consultant.

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That's really good to know as I've been trying to get away from enamels and lacquers for health reasons but darned if Gunze didn't just pull the plug on that one when they stopped shipping Mr. Hobby Aqueous paints to the States. Tell me, what was the reason for doing that in the first place?...I mean, I'd truly think between Mr. Hobby and it's replacement now, Mr. Color, that the first of these would have been a healthier alternative.

Greg

Good plan, as enamels, and some lacquers, will essentially go away in the next five to ten years, anyway. As for what the deal was/is with Gunze Sanyo products, I've not a clue. Difficult to find any reliable, first hand information on their product lines. I used to have a link to their parent company, and could get there, but I lost the link.

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Just using some Surfacer 500 on my 1/72 Revell Super Hornet (E model) on the intakes. Does this mean I can use a Q-tip and alcohol to smooth it? And if so, for how long will the Alcohol affect it or allow it to be smoothed?

Thanks,

John

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I brush it on seams and sink-marks but I don't sand it....I use Mr Color Thinner on a Q-Tip and the Mr. Color Thinner melts the Mr. Surfacer.

Great for not losing surface detail. But yeah....it's pretty funky smelling stuff. Not as nasty as L/T but close.

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I think I've heard of people using iso-alcohol (rubbing alcohol) and you might want to try nail polish remover too...but the Mr Colour Thinner

is the best I've found for this. As far as I've found so far this stuff melts

- Mr Surfacer

- Tamiya Putty

- Tamiya Primer

And you can leave a plastic part soaking in it all night and the plastic won't melt

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I've been using Mr. Surfacer 500 for awhile with mixed results. One thing you have to watch out for is getting too much alcohol/thinner on your q-tip because the excess will lay in the seams and eat away at it leaving pits in the filler. Also you might want to mask off anything around it because you don't want the thinned out Mr. 500 getting all over the place because it does not come off easily. Its a little tricky to work with and I find that I usually sand most of it back off. Try to use as little as possible.

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I have the Tamiya surface primer to fill small gaps. I guess its similar to Mr Surfacer. if I apply it with a brush, wouldn't the brush clog and become unusable? Or is there a solution to use to clean it?

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I have the Tamiya surface primer to fill small gaps. I guess its similar to Mr Surfacer. if I apply it with a brush, wouldn't the brush clog and become unusable? Or is there a solution to use to clean it?

I had that happen with the Mr Surfacer, until I learned (on an ARC thread) that you can clean it with ISO-alcohol. It's worked like a charm

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So how do you properly thin Mr. Surfacer for airbrushing? And how do you clean the airbrush after?

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So how do you properly thin Mr. Surfacer for airbrushing?

Lacquer thinners or IPA.

And how do you clean the airbrush after?

Same as.

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