Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Easy enough. I've been looking at the airbrush posts on here and I've kind of narrowed it down to the H&S 2n1. What do you guys that have this think about it? Also, wondering why there's no second needle, do the different size nozzles take the place of different needles. What size of spray pattern do the different nozzles provide?

Edited by Frankhenrylee
Link to post
Share on other sites

I popped for the Infinity 2-n-1 & added the 'fine pressure control valve' last fall. It is very easy to use & clean.

One good thing is the nozzles cost about half of the Iwata price. And they are easier to remove & clean.

Like most things I have it is capable of better performance than I am.

Link to post
Share on other sites

How did you conclude there is only one needle? Both the H&S 2-in-1 options (Evolution and Infinity) include 2 tips, 2 needles, and 2 color cups.

If you want the ability to adjust air pressure at the brush, I would recommend the Evolution Silverline fpc 2-in-1. AFAIK, the fpc option isnt available on the Infinity.

I build 1/72 and only use the 0.15mm combo for fine details such as Luftwaffe mottle. I find the 0.2mm needle/tip combo works for most everything slse although the 0.4mm combo is better for larger areas.

Link to post
Share on other sites
If you want the ability to adjust air pressure at the brush, I would recommend the Evolution Silverline fpc 2-in-1. AFAIK, the fpc option isnt available on the Infinity.

I have one on mine, but I had to buy it separate as an option. It did not come with the brush.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I have one on mine, but I had to buy it separate as an option. It did not come with the brush.

The Evolution Silverline fpc includes the pressure adjustment.

I suspect it may depend when and where you buy the brush. I got mine from a European store perhaps four years ago before they were being sold directly in the US, and it did include the pressure control. Since I adjust pressure at the compressor, I would have preferred an option not to include it ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

As someone that imports H&S to the UK, I have asked the company if they can supply a version of the infinity with the fPc.

But the answer I get is that there is no demand for it !

The solution I normally suggest for my customers to to buy the quick release hose connector with a mac valve integrated.

It works out at about half the price of the fPc valve and gives the same control over the air pressure.

Glad to see some people have mentioned the Evolution Silverline fPc two in one, it's the best price performance compromise for people who want to be able to tackle fine detail as well as larger area work.

One thing I would also sugest is to get a couple of the H&S cleaning brushes, they are just the right size for the body and the nozzle and don't cost much.

I usually throw one in with when people buy a brush.

Paul

www.little-cars.co.uk/airbrushes

Edited by little-cars
Link to post
Share on other sites

On there site they only mention the nozzles and cups, good to know there are needles too. Does anyone have a verdict on there spray pattern for supplied needles. Most companies say something like hairline to 1" or something like that. Couldn't find anything on there site.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are in the states you can order H&S parts here:

http://precisiongermanairbrush.com/accessories_harder.html

Scroll down to the fittings, you can buy the fpc valve separately. As Paul states there is also a quick disconnect with air control for almost half the price of the fpc valve.

Precision German Airbrush is the primary distributor of H&S for the US.

Edited by terryt
Link to post
Share on other sites

I am a H&S Infinity convert from Iwata and I will happily say it is one of the best choices I have ever made!! The Infinity is the best performing and easiest to clean airbrush I have ever owned.

That being said, I still use an Iwata HP-B from time to time as well and still love it.

You really can't go wrong with either frankly.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On there site they only mention the nozzles and cups, good to know there are needles too. Does anyone have a verdict on there spray pattern for supplied needles. Most companies say something like hairline to 1" or something like that. Couldn't find anything on there site.

There aren't any published figures and it depends on distance, pressure and what you are spraying through the brush.

The Guide I use is;

0.15mm is for very fine detail up to and inch or so.

0.2mm nozzle, general detail to area coverage on up to 1/48th fighters.

0.4mm overlaps a little with the 0.2mm, but is good for general work and as a backup set incase you damage the 0.2mm.

0.6mm is for larger areas and larger grain paints like metalflake car paints.

Paul

www.little-cars.co.uk/airbrushes

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just curious, but how easy is it to clean the Evolution?

The reason I ask is, I have a Badger 200-1. To give it a good cleaning (as opposed to running lacquer thinner or Windex through it), I take it apart and put the metal parts that have paint on them, into a beaker of acetone (for enamel paint) or acetonitrile (for acrylics), and sonicate them. (I work in a lab; I don't have this stuff at home!) Would the Evolution need this kind of cleaning? Or is it discouraged?

Nice as the Badger is, I'm looking to buy a double-action sometime (finances permitting).

Link to post
Share on other sites
...Would the Evolution need this kind of cleaning? ...

Does the Evolution need this, no, but most any airbrush will benefit from a thorough cleaning.

The tip and internal nozzle (or cone) are removed by simply unscrewing by hand. A compression nut holds the needle in place and also can be loosened by hand, permitting you to extract the needle from the front of the brush. It is remotely possible to get paint back into the body of the brush, but you would certainly have to work at it. The tip and nozzle are easily cleaned by hand (I use the small dental brushes and Q-tips), as is the paint chamber and removable color cup. I use acrylics, and a couple of times I have had to soak the nozzle in lacquer thinner, but that is about it. Usually disassembly and hand cleaning with Windex or Simple Green is enough.

Link to post
Share on other sites

H&S EVo & infinity need cleaning, but they are modular and designed for the most part to be taken apart without any special tools.

The only exception is the gold waist on the Infinity which they supply a metal dowel to loosen.

As has been said the nozzle, with a teflon washer at the back, fits in the aircap/head an compression fits onto the body of the brush.

The cleaning routine I would go for is to blast through some cleaner to shift most of the leftover paint.

Then put some cleaner in the paint cup, remove any dried on paint with an old paintbrush, then tip the bits and the cleaner out.

The paint cup can then be removed (if you want to) to get better access to the body

Remove the back of the brush loosen the needle and remove it from the back of the brush, and wipe it clean.

Then remove the head& nozzle. Put the head to one side, there should be nothing to clean except maybe a smattering of paint where the paint exits the nozzle.

H&S produce their own cleaning brush, these are cheap and are made to fit both the body of the brush and the nozzle.

Use the brush to clean out the body of the brush with some cleaner, you can use a cotton bud to clean out the bottom of the paint cup.

Then use the thinner end of the brush with cleaner to clean out the Nozzle.

If you find you are getting a lot of paint building up in the tapered part of the nozzle for any reason, H&S produce their own metal reamer that cleans out the tapered part.

Put the cup and nozzle/head back on the brush.

Push the needle in from the back, pushing it in from the front has been known to damage the internal teflon washer.

Then put the handle back on & spray a little cleaner through to check it's all clean.

One thing to remember with solvent cleaners is that they can swell up the rubber o ring on the head, (causing air bubbles back to the paint cup, or a squashed washer) and the one on top of the air valve (you find the air valve is a little stiff and may stick open).

If this happens just put the brush somewhere warm overnight for the rubber to degass and it's normally all ok from then on.

Most domestic ultrasonic cleaners will damage rubber o rings and can warp teflon ones, so make sure you strip these before you put the metal parts in such a cleaner.

Cleaning usually only takes five minutes at the most.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh another thing to point out...is the needles and tips can take a fair share of punishment...it seemed like I was replacing the needles and nozzles on my Tamiya and Iwata brushes every six months or so...I haven't had to do that with my Infiniti...and I even bought extra needles!

The only thing I had to replace is the teflon o-rings where the needle seats..but they are cheap

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...