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Old Blind Dog

How do you get jet fuel smell out of clothes?

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My "nephew in law" is going through a program to become an aircraft mecahnic (he worked on A-10s in the USAF in Iraq and Afghanistan). Anyway, he got some jet fuel on his shirt the other day, and my niece is at a loss as to how to get out the smell. Any suggestions (preferably based on real experience rather than theory)?

TIA

cheers

Old Blind Dog

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My "nephew in law" is going through a program to become an aircraft mecahnic (he worked on A-10s in the USAF in Iraq and Afghanistan). Anyway, he got some jet fuel on his shirt the other day, and my niece is at a loss as to how to get out the smell. Any suggestions (preferably based on real experience rather than theory)?

TIA

cheers

Old Blind Dog

as far as I know...its there for good. I work at an FBO and I get fuel spilled on me on a daily basis. multiple washings, dry cleanings, even a barrel of fabreze* couldn't get the smell out. It would be agood idea to get a set of work clothes and NEVER work in your home clothes.

Sean

* slight exageration here!!!!

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A match will work :) haha other than repeated washings thats about all you can do always have some type of stuff on the flight suit at the end of the day Erick

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Having seven years experience as a KC-135 crew chief (read - A LOT OF JP-8!!), and three years as a C-130 Flight Engineer I can speak with some authority that it will not go away. Especially if you get a direct spill on your uniform or boots. Black boots will never be able to be shined again. You will throw them away. (I threw two pair in the trash just for that reason.) Any BDUs that took a direct hit with JP-8 didn't last very long, but we wore coveralls for the most part when I was a crew chief, and those stayed in my locker. The leather boots always seemed to take the worst of it for me.

Mark

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I worked a military flightline for 23 years and it does wash out. Our coveralls always came back smelling "fresh as a daisy" but I have no idea what they used.

Fuel is harder to get out but will after repeated washes in hot soapy water. I think the reason flight crews can't get the smell out is they wear the same clothing for weeks on end. I regularly turned in my coveralls for cleaning. FLightcrews are forced to travel in their gear and wear it for much longer periods of time.

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why on earth would you even TRY to get the smell out??

(Sarcasm boys)

I like the smell of a flightsuit that is not too dingy, with a 'tad' of jet fuel odor. Not avgas tho, that makes me dizzy.

Cheers

H.

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Strictly speaking, anything that smells is volatile, meaning it will evaporate. Leave the clothes out in the sun for an extended period and the smell will eventually go away. Of course extended and eventually are the key words here :) I've no idea what the half-life of Jet-A might be.

:cheers:

Edited by mkimages

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Luckeeeee! I got the smell of I-4, I-275, and the smells of food from three little girls eating in my truck......

Daughters are great but I cannot believe how they can trash a truck!

-Jim

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i find regular laundry detergent works fine. just make sure you wash your work clothes seperate from the good clothes.

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I worked a military flightline for 23 years and it does wash out. Our coveralls always came back smelling "fresh as a daisy" but I have no idea what they used.

And how far up your legs did the trousers finish by the time you got rid of them? :)

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Try castrol super clean in the washer, about a cup per load. I have used it to get motor oil off clothes, cooking oil and other oily based substances.

Assuming it works for motor oil, I am guessing it would work for jet fuel.

Line dry though, high heat and volatile vapors are a bad combo

Ric

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Try a can of coke .... 20 years on the flightline.... Worked for my wife.....

Try castrol super clean in the washer, about a cup per load. I have used it to get motor oil off clothes, cooking oil and other oily based substances.

Assuming it works for motor oil, I am guessing it would work for jet fuel.

Line dry though, high heat and volatile vapors are a bad combo

Ric

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Worked in oil refineries for 40 years making the stuff, never mix home and work clothes, but our overalls went to an industrial laundry firm and came back fresh smelling, think they were steam cleaned.

Cheers

Den

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I've been a mech in the Navy for thirteen years, and get fuel on me EVERY day, I found that just using detergent and a can of coke works good. I usually wear my coveralls for two weeks or so before I decide to change the oil in them, and they get done smelling like a mountain breeze:)

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have to teach him not to let the jets **** on his leg, he'll never get any respect that way...

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I find that working around JP 5, if I get a direct splash, dish soap smeared onto the stain, and then regular washing works well.

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And how far up your legs did the trousers finish by the time you got rid of them? :banana:

I wore my ginch under my coveralls. I hung up my uniform each day in my locker.

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Thanks for the coke idea gents!

First time I heard the Coke trick too.

I hope Pepsi works too, I'd hate to waste a good Coke.

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Although, now that I think about it, spending every day for thirteen years working with the stuff, I've kind of become oblivious to the smell, especially when we work in fuel cells. The stuff is everywhere in the shop, in parts, on people, dripped on the floor from time to time, my keyboard probably smells like it too:)

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