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What are those bumps on either side of the fuselage just ahead of the fins? Camera mounts? Sensors? Also, is that an exhaust just to the inside right of the left fin? Looks to be some sort of APU vent maybe?

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What are those bumps on either side of the fuselage just ahead of the fins? Camera mounts? Sensors? Also, is that an exhaust just to the inside right of the left fin? Looks to be some sort of APU vent maybe?

The bumps are radar reflectors like the F-22s Lundberg lens (sorry for the spelling error) to make the aircraft appear on radar and that is the APU. On the navy version it vents upward and is on top rather than the bottom of the aircraft

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Thanks. I have the 1/48 Kitty Hawk F-35C and it doesn't have the APU vent on the top. In fact, where on the bottom is it located on the A and B models?

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Thanks. I have the 1/48 Kitty Hawk F-35C and it doesn't have the APU vent on the top. In fact, where on the bottom is it located on the A and B models?

http://www.f-16.net/forum/download/file.php?id=14613&t=1

DT-3 wraps up ahead of schedule:

https://www.f35.com/news/detail/f-35c-completes-dt-iii-ahead-of-schedule

F-35 is going to the middle east:

The Marine Corps will deploy the F-35 into the Middle East next year, a Marine Corps general said Tuesday.

"We're the first ones that are going to be deploying it. We are going to be deploying it on the USS Wasp. The interesting thing is, not only are we deploying it on the Wasp, we're also going to deploy it on the [uSS] Essex during the same year in Central Command," said Lt. Gen. Robert Walsh at a breakfast with defense reporters.

"So not only are we going to do one, we're going to do two. So that's quite the challenge to put two squadrons aboard two ships and deploy them," he said.

Ten F-35Bs are headed to the Iwakuni Marine Corps Air Station in January, with six more scheduled to arrive after that in a scheduled change of station.

Six F-35Bs are currently slated to go on the USS Wasp, while 10 will stay at the air station, Walsh said. The Wasp and Essex are amphibious assault ships.

Walsh said he wasn't sure exactly when the F-35B would get to the Essex, but said it could potentially be eight months after the Wasp.

"The Essex right now is getting ready to go through modifications — so its F-35 alterations. Wasp was complete, it was our test ship, now [uSS] America has just come out, and I think we're getting ready to just do more F-35 integration testing on America. Essex will go in and it will get those mods, and then it will come out and be ready for a deployment, I think, it's probably eight months or so after Wasp," he said.

"We want to exploit fifth generation," Walsh said. "That's what I think it is as we look at this airplane. We've been after this for a long time. We're replacing our F-15s [TYPO], our Harriers and our EA-6s with that airplane."

Walsh said the deployment of the F-35 would provide the Navy with greater capability that hasn't been available on an amphibious ship.

"Our airplanes before were CAS — close air support. Now with that airplane, you can just imagine what the battle force within the Navy will have with that airplane," he said.

"It'll not just be close air support, it's going to open missions up across the battle force and certainly within the [Amphibious Ready Group — Marine Expeditionary Unit]."

Edited by TaiidanTomcat

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More from the same event:

F-35A completes largest deployment to date

VOLK FIELD AIR NATIONAL GUARD BASE, WI, UNITED STATES

09.01.2016

Story by Senior Airman Stormy Archer

33rd Fighter Wing/Public Affairs

The 33rd Fighter Wing wrapped up the largest F-35 deployment to date at this year’s Exercise Northern Lightning Aug. 31 at Volk Field, Wis.

Northern Lightning is a tactical-level, joint training exercise which serves as a combat rehearsal for both legacy and modern aerial and ground assets in a contested, degraded environment.

The 33rd FW deployed over 150 personnel and 14 F-35As for two weeks to train to a realistic threat level and develop how to deploy and sustain a squadron of F-35s.

The Air Force announced the fighter jet was initially capable of combat operations in August of this year. With the service’s shift in focus to full operational capability for the aircraft, the lessons learned from this exercise will shape future real-world deployments of F-35A squadrons.

“The aircraft and program still have maturing left to do, but that is a scary thought for our adversaries,” said Lt. Col. Brad Bashore, 58th Fighter Squadron commander. “The performance here proves this aircraft is combat ready, even in its infancy.”

The 33rd FW scored over 110 kills against “enemy aircraft,” supported a surge of 138 sorties and dropped 24 GBU-12 bombs during Northern Lightning.

During the exercise, 33rd FW pilots were able to execute offensive counter air, suppression of enemy air defenses, destruction of enemy air defenses, and employ GPS-guided munitions for close air support.

“This exercise has increased my confidence in the F-35,” Capt. Mark Schnell, 33rd FW pilot said. “Believing that you are invisible is hard. (But) to come out and fly against fourth-generation assets and really see that the stealth capabilities of the F-35 are as advertised has been awesome. It makes our job easier knowing that we are (stealthy), and we can arrive at a position of advantage without (our adversary) knowing.”

Crews from the 33rd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron were able to support operational demands of the exercise by executing a high-tempo maintenance schedule, and preparing aircraft to drop munitions in a deployed location with less manning and resources than afforded to them at home station.

“This is the first time the program has supported such an extensive aircraft deployment,” 1st Lt. Krista Wooden, 33rd AMXS Aircraft Maintenance Unit assistant officer in charge, said. “We were able to simulate a deployed priority on our supply system, (and) successfully gauge the logistics of how a deployment will successfully run its course.”

The F-35A pilots practiced joint operations with F-16 Fighting Falcons, F/A-18 Super Hornets, E/A-18 Growlers and E-3 Sentries to create a more lethal and survivable strike package. The experience gained from deploying as a total force will shape how the units work together in future combat operations.

“Working with the F-35A really provides a unique capability for us,” Capt. Austin Kennedy, E/A-18 Growler electronic warfare officer, said. “They allow us the opportunity to train against more advanced threats that a fourth-generation aircraft wouldn’t be able to go after.

“The (low observable) characteristics of the jet make our jamming more effective, and it makes it easier for us to do our job.”

The dynamic threat environment of the 115th Fighter Wing’s Northern Lightning exercise provides a unique training ground for the fifth generation fighter with surface to air threats, a large air space that extends up to 50,000 feet, inter-service training and an expansive range for live and inert weapons drops.

“Thanks to the Air National Guard, and their herculean efforts to make this exercise happen,” said Lt. Col. Brad Bashore, 58th FS commander, said. “Thank you to the Deluth and Maddison Guard for being our adversaries during this exercise. It’s not always fun being red air and flying against us when you’re at a disadvantage. We couldn’t have done this without you.”

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Thanks. I have the 1/48 Kitty Hawk F-35C and it doesn't have the APU vent on the top. In fact, where on the bottom is it located on the A and B models?

It's not an APU, it's called the IPP, or Integrated Power Package. The difference is far more than an acronym; the IPP runs before the engine starts, during MX, and after the main engine shuts down. It provides full time power and cooling to the AC systems AL THE TIME. It also is the emergency power in case the main fails, and can provide the electrical power to keep the flight controls working if the main goes. It is an essential part of AC operations, not just a glorifies start cart.

The Kittyhawk kits left off both the inlet, exhaust, and the aero "bump" in front of the IPP that is essential to pull the hot exhaust off the jet skin. Probably the biggest detail miss on those kits IMO.

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Agree 100%. But considering whose in charge and the corner he's painted himself into I am not holding my breath <_< .

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Agree 100%. But considering whose in charge and the corner he's painted himself into I am not holding my breath <_</> .

I'm hoping that he has changed his mind. I think if we were going with Super Hornets, it would have been announced by now given the suddenly "urgent" need to replace the CF-18 that they claimed a few month's ago. I was at the Abbotsford show and it was a huge sales pitch by Boeing. I thought he would have announced a Super Hornet purchase immediately afterward. The fact that he hasn't yet makes me optimistic that we might just yet get the F-35. I'm not opposed to getting 30-40 Super's in the interim as they are very capable 4th gen aircraft, but clearly to me, the F-35 is the superior aircraft, and the one we should be getting.

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Realistically I think we will end up with F-35. I can't see an interm purchase just because we couldn't afford to operate 2 fighter types. Super Hornet does not come with the sensors which are built into Lightning 2. So for the same price we get a fighter with all the sensor suites built in where you'd have to purchase all the extra stuff on top of the airframe with the SH.

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This thread seems to have died since the great ARC shut down of 2016.  Haven't seen any posts elsewhere from some of the "smart guys" who contributed to it, not sure if they've moved on from ARC or not.   Anywho, found an interesting discussion on the F-35's ECM and countermeasure dispensers here.   

 

http://forum.keypublishing.com/showthread.php?140510-Interesting-information-about-ASQ-239

 

Never knew the F-35 had a towed decoy system.  The thread also has some interesting info on changes to the external pylons. 

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On 2016-09-03 at 2:51 PM, Emvar said:

Realistically I think we will end up with F-35. I can't see an interm purchase just because we couldn't afford to operate 2 fighter types. Super Hornet does not come with the sensors which are built into Lightning 2. So for the same price we get a fighter with all the sensor suites built in where you'd have to purchase all the extra stuff on top of the airframe with the SH.

 

I may have posted this elsewhere in the thread previously... but realistically, the only significant thing that can keep the F-35 in the future of our Air Force is the fact that so much was developed here and all the technology transfer that would be lost, as well as the investment made by Canadian companies over the last decade or however long its been (seems like forever to me...).

 

The Super Hornet production line is up and running (for how long... who knows) but if Canada were to buy them, Canadian business would get next to nothing out of the deal. Is Boeing suddenly going to change suppliers for "X million $$$" worth of sub-assemblies, parts, software, etc? Hell no. They might throw a few bones across the border, but nothing major.

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Out of all the tricks this aircraft is capable of doing, in my opinion, this is one of the more impressive.

 

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=96652

 

Still a ways off from being operational but it's got some real potential.  All of a sudden, it's not as easy to complain about the light A2A weapons loadout on the F-35, when you can back it up with dozens of 250 mile range SM-6's.

 

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Here's a news story from a few weeks ago:

 

http://www.msn.com/en-us/money/companies/pentagon-to-lockheed-take-it-or-leave-it/ar-AAjR2Hg?ocid=spartanntp

 

Excerpt:

The Defense Department apparently got tired of getting nowhere and on Tuesday the generals made an offer to Lockheed that the company essentially cannot refuse: $6.1 billion for 57 planes, take it or leave it.

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Yep, just enough SH to buy some time, but not a complete replacement.  Be interesting to see if Prime Minister Bieber goes through with this for real, or if this is a ploy to eventually buy F-35s and save face.  Either way, I'll believe it when rubber is on the ramp.

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On ‎9‎/‎2‎/‎2016 at 0:03 PM, MarkW said:

It's not an APU, it's called the IPP, or Integrated Power Package. The difference is far more than an acronym; the IPP runs before the engine starts, during MX, and after the main engine shuts down. It provides full time power and cooling to the AC systems AL THE TIME. It also is the emergency power in case the main fails, and can provide the electrical power to keep the flight controls working if the main goes. It is an essential part of AC operations, not just a glorifies start cart.

The Kittyhawk kits left off both the inlet, exhaust, and the aero "bump" in front of the IPP that is essential to pull the hot exhaust off the jet skin. Probably the biggest detail miss on those kits IMO.

Is there a close up photo anywhere of the IPP so it can be modeled on the kit?

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On 9/2/2016 at 11:03 AM, MarkW said:

It's not an APU, it's called the IPP, or Integrated Power Package. The difference is far more than an acronym; the IPP runs before the engine starts, during MX, and after the main engine shuts down. It provides full time power and cooling to the AC systems AL THE TIME. It also is the emergency power in case the main fails, and can provide the electrical power to keep the flight controls working if the main goes. It is an essential part of AC operations, not just a glorifies start cart.

 

This what saved Slim's butt when AA-1 had an "anomoly" on flight 19 in Ft Worth.

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jpk, your best bet is to hit Google images  It will be the hole on the port side bottom, near the tail.  There is a bump in front of the IPP, which is subtle and would be hard to get right.

 

NEWs:  Japan received the first FMS jet at Luke AFB (dedicated trainer),

http://www.upi.com/Business_News/Security-Industry/2016/12/02/Japan-receives-its-first-F-35-joint-strike-fighter/4121480695126/

 

and Israel ordered its last tranche of 17 to get to 50 jets total. 

https://www.rt.com/news/368382-israel-orders-more-f35/

 

The first Israeli F-35A should be arriving in Israel later this month.  These are the first jets delivered outside the US, and likely will never come back unless there is an air show.

http://www.jpost.com/Israel-News/Israel-to-regain-total-air-dominance-as-countdown-to-touchdown-of-F-35-nears-473983

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5 hours ago, MarkW said:

jpk, your best bet is to hit Google images  It will be the hole on the port side bottom, near the tail.  There is a bump in front of the IPP, which is subtle and would be hard to get right.

 

Between the MARINES stencil and the nozzle doors:

 

b5cc4e73d3abcfe368064229a7197c0f.jpg

Edited by habu2

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