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KMelz

Painting

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Is there a way to make the model's surface appear "smoother" using only a brush to paint? I've got brush stroke lines all over.

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I suck at this also! The only way I get a smooth finish is to lay the paint on kinda thick. I have seen some awesome brush paint jobs on here though. It's PFM to me how they do it.

Curt

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Rather than one thick layer, the usual tip would be to paint multiple layers with thinned down paint, the first layer must not necessarily cover the underlying color in the first session.

Cheers

Thorsten

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I mostly airbrush but the trick to get a nice surface finish is

1/Get a good brush. I know they cost 5 times a cheap one but they last longer and give MUCH better results.

2/ Use a thinned paint, applying 5+ coats instead of trying to cover it all in one shot.

The only way I get a smooth finish is to lay the paint on kinda thick

This will give a good finish thanks to surface tension but it will also drown any surface detail :worship:

Let us know how it goes :worship:

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1. Never go over the same area twice in one coat. One of the main reasons for brush strokes is that the brush is dry or out of paint, or going over an area that's already partially dry.

2. Apply a series of THIN coats. Don't worry about covering everything on the first try; just build up the color gradually.

3. Make sure each coat is thoroughly dry before applying the next one.

4. Keep the paint as warm as possible.

5. Make sure the paint is properly thinned (usually to the consistency of skim milk)

6.Always keep the brush itself wet with thinner. NEVER touch the surface with a dry brush. (Exception would be to remove lint or grit that gets on to the wet paint; then take a clean, dry brush and gently "swick" off the offending foreign matter.)

7. Use long gentle strokes. Avoid short strokes as much as possible.

8. Always make sure your brush is CLEAN and SOFT before painting.

9. Use the best soft red sable brushes you can find. NEVER EVER EVER use those cr*ppy synthetic brushes that come in the cheap "hobby paint sets" (such as the white-handled Testors ones); they are only good for spreading glue and throwing away.

10. Always use the type of thinner recommended by the manufacturer. If you want a good hand-brushed finish, the first thing you need to learn is NOT TO CUT CORNERS.

Here's how to go about it: keep a small amount of thinner in a container (I use a pop bottle cap) near the paint bottle; dip the brush into the thinner, then into the paint. Wipe the excess paint from the brush on a clean surface (NEVER on the paint bottle rim itself); apply paint to the model, bearing in mind the ten ideas mentioned above; repeat these steps until first coat is complete. Allow time for drying (during which time you can clean your brush) and repeat process for second coat and so on and so forth.

Remember, this process takes some time, so be patient, and don't try and get it all done in one session.

HTH

cheers

Old Blind Dog

Edited by Old Blind Dog

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sound advice OBD as well as patience, lots of it, because with out it and rushing things only causes problems and produces inferior results...

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I think Blind Dog covers everything I read so far on this topic (yet did not have time to repeat it in my earlier post)

Maybe two smaller additions. Rather than dipping a brush saturated with thinner into the paint bottle (ans thus risking ruining the paint in the long run), try to transfer a certain amount of paint into a smaller container (e.g. second pop bottle cap)

If you are using water based paints, think about using a "wet pallete". One of many search results using google is the following link.

http://www.bolterandchainsword.com/index.p...howtopic=110635

But try a search yourself to get an idea for different makes of this typ of pallete. I had good results using Revell Aqua and Citadel Paints.

Cheers

Thorsten

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I would add: always brush in the same direction. Once you establish a "grain" stick with it and don't go against it, as that;s one sure-fire way to get visible brush strokes when the paint dries.

Good luck

cheers

Old Blind Dog

Edited by Old Blind Dog

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