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It has been on my mind recently with some builds I'm doing, as to how much emphasis I should put on the accuracy of the build. I do think and want the kit to be as accurate as possible, however since none will be entered in any show or likely taken out and away from my home for others to view, though they will be shown here and possibly in other forums. How much effort do you guys put into a kit being anatomically correct if one of yours is going to be in a similar setting. I'm talking about areas that will not be seen without up/close and personal inspection, such as the rudder pedals, or the turbine/compressor blades.. I do realize that the end result is left to the builders discretion, but a certain amount of pride is also involved. Let's go hypothetical and say you're doing a kit that's 15/20 years old and has none of the modern gadgets added; PE, Resin, but has decent business office detail, good IP and side panels OK seat.

How far will you go to make it as anatomically correct as possible, and when do you stop at it's a close facsimile?.

Edited by Angels49
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That´s a tough question...

I can say that I build 3 categories of models, OOB, some detailing ( a cockpitset or so) and superdetailing.

I like having builds on my shelves and I´ve realized that if I only superdetail models I´d just build one or maybe two models a year..and that´d not put a dent in my stash :banana: So I superdetail maybe one build a year, that makes me build either OOB or some detailing for the most part and that brings my total to around 10 builds a year...some times more and sometimes less.

I don´t, how ever, build any different wether I´m entering a competition or not, it´s simply acording to my mood at the time....

Some builds I want to last forever and some I want to be done with quickly, well I guess the point I´m trying to make is that I always build for myself...I invite you guys in on my builds but they´re still mine and only for me. So I can´t say I´d skip on accuracy if I would build something just to put on my shelve....it´s got more to do with mood. In the end all my models end up on the shelves or display cases anyway :thumbsup:

Cheers

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well Clif, I build for me, and my "audience of one" (an Army jab at her)

I try to only use the "good stuff" kits, and still get them as accurate as possible

getting as old as some of the modelers I read online, I've realized that I had two choices,,,,,,,get one a year done for the next ten years,,,,,and have only 10 models using the "new molds and all the goodies",,,,,,or concentrate on building AOOB, and having the display I really want finished in my lifetime (AOOB=Almost OOB)

so, I chose a level of technology from all the varied options,,,ended up with this:

1/72 Hasegawa, Fujimi, Tamiya, and Academy wherever possible,,,,,,Matchbox and Revell and Italeri wherever required,,,,,,,*some* resin or limited issue injected kits,,,,,but not many

AM Decals, weapons and upgrade parts from spares from the "uber kits" for the "lesser kits"

best possible matches for colors,,,,,without searching for a color that no company made,,,,,"just mix them up and get moving"

I've been toying with a competition build, but, haven't really decided if I'll do that or not,,,,,,and even if I do, it will probably just be intended for the local shows

hmm, not sure if I even answered what you asked in my rambling on

Rex

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I go as far as I can Clif, within the bounds of what I have available. Ive never been one for a C-note's worth of after market stuff, and I dont have the long term patience for such projects. I like to keep it simple: a finely rendered finish, accurate and lightly weathered. I also like to see the major details, clear and in proper scale. But beyond these things, I dont get arsed over penultimate detail.

I once held a finely rendered miniature before my beloved wife, proud of my achievement. I had just completed it and wanted to share every nuance and subtlety I had built into it. I extolled it's many features as she listened.... for about 20 seconds.

"What does it do?" she asked, interrupting my litany.

"DO? Why, nothing. It is a faithful scale replica, a piece of history in miniature. It doesn't have to do anything."

"Oh. Well... that's nice honey. Soooo, when are you gonna fix the leak in the toilet tank?"

This was a liberating moment. I was thereafter freed from the compulsion of doing more to a model, than I felt like doing.

Edited by dahut
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For me, modeling is just a hobby and just for fun. I have no interest in ever showing my models, much less enter any sort of competition. I try to get details correct if I can, but at the end of the day it's just about having fun and I don't sweat the small stuff. I have nothing but awe and respect for those who can accurately model a subject to the last detail, but I don't have the patience or attention span that doing so requires.

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As Wingspan states it's just a hobby and just for fun, but I know a lot of you guys take it very seriously and as for 'uberbuilds' I don't have the skills but I envy and admire those that do.

As such I don't build replicas, I build representations - a subtle difference. I never buy aftermarket products with the exception of decals. I'm one of those ( and there many on this and other forums ) who build OOB, it's my hobby and I take the viewpoint that if it's supposed to be a Spitfire and it looks like a Spitfire then that's good enough for me.

Regards

Brian

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Everyone should enter contests!

I'm a big supporter of entering contests, even if you have no interest in competition or trophys. Why? Because this hobby tends to be a very isolating one, so it's nice to get out of the basement a few times a year and see other people's models. If the only guys who entered contests were those who believed they had a chance of winning, there might be five models in each category. Contests would quickly become a thing of the past because they wouldn't be financially viable.

I'm like Aigore, building a few models mostly OOB with a little detail and a few models with extreme detail (more or less). I enter contests only with the hope of winning, but I find that trying to meet those high standards keeps me from getting sloppy.

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I agree with thegoodsgt. I think it is in everyone's interest to enter a contest, or at least regularly attend them. By simply seeing other peoples' models, your build quality will increase. You'll see what judges look for and often see new techniques/tricks that you would have never thought of before. That will help you build better and, in turn, be more confident in your skills. It isn't necessarily about winning, but about furthering your skills.

Personally, I'm not an accuracy builder. I constantly do things that I think make the model "pop", not that make it "look accurate". It's just my personal taste. I almost always build for contests. I enjoy the competition and the camaraderie. Since contests don't judge on accuracy, I'm not concerned with it. I've learned what judges like to see and if it tickles their fancy, I know the general "layperson" would love it to when they see it on my shelf. For me, it is really more about detail, not accuracy. Accuracy in modeling is really unattainable, regardless of what anyone says. The models we build do not fly and are not of aluminum and steel. They are simply replicas of real things....how can something fake be accurate? You can spend your time replicating something, but it will never be truly accurate, it will only appear to be more like the real thing.

That being said, I absolutely LOVE seeing people pour their hearts and souls into a kit. It just isn't my personality. I respect those people's talents and patience.....because it takes dedication to spend hundreds or thousands of hours on a kit.

I'm just more of a kit assembler they will add a little resin or photo-etch here and there to give a kit more detail. If the resin isn't "accurate", so be it.....I won't know the difference anyways. It is more about the appearance to me.

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I build to my own standards ... it makes me happy. But I think my standards are high. I try to be accurate, but rather than try to replicate a part accurately, I'll go for just an indication, an impression, of the overall assembly. 'Gizmo-fy' is a good word. Just make it LOOK accurate.

Being back in the hobby for about 4 years, I also enter contests. And because my main interest is in the US Space Program, competition is non-existant. But I like to exhibit mainly to educate the viewer as to the significance of the actual hardware. To get a kid to ask his dad, what the heck is THAT thing? ... and then have his dad explain what happened 40-some years ago.

And, as an aside, I've done very well. Been in FSM's 2010 annual, been published in Europe, but I build, for me. The research, and then the scratchbuilding, is what turns me on. The painting ... not so much.

But I build for me. To my level of satisfaction.

And I couldn't agree more about entering contests. Just for the fun of it. If you win something, good ... if not ... that's good too. But you can compare, improve and 'shoot da breeze' with other modelers. Not to mention the deadline, and just the whole spirit of competition.

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Since I've yet to enter a contest, I build for me.

My latest build (1/32 Revell Corsair) is a perfect example. I've added detail (249 parts to be exact) but its not 100% correct. Its better then OOB but its not plumbed and wired like so many great build I see.

Could it do well in a contest, I guess so. But it makes me happy knowing I've added detail that wasn't there and the final result is convincing.

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One of the reasons I build 1/72 is to reduce the urge to get crazy on details that even in larger scales will in reality not be that noticable. I do try to do my best on the basics, but I generally will not go nuts trying to get rid of a hairline seam on the bottom of the fuselage near the tail wheel or other rarely seen area. I do address these imperfections, but only to a degree.

I'm loving all the older kits coming back (and ebay for those that are still floating around). I've gotten pretty good at whipping up a basic interior for all those empty fuselages that only provided a pilot with a post up his bum. No real attempt at accuracy there, just something to fill the void.

I guess the only area where I really do try to maintain a fair level of accuracy is the paint and markings, as those will be noticable at some distance. When I do build something with external stores I do like to make sure they are at least plausable even if not common, and as much as possible I like to have a load that is representitive of what would have been seen on a typical example of the aircraft. I do like variety though so if I'm doing multiples, I will try to include some examples of what could be carried, not all with the common load out.

That is aircraft though, when I'm building US Forest Service fire apparatus, I put a lot more effort into accuracy since it is a subject I have a lot of knowledge about, and one that is important to me. I try to build them as if they are tiny museum displays, so I do my best to get the details right.

I'll third thegoodsgts comments about contests, I don't participate in many and don't go with the intent of winning anything, but it is fun to display my stuff along with many others. One of my favorite events is NNL West an auto themed no prizes uncontest (really just a big modeling display). It is fun to see all the models, browse the venders and rub elbows with other modelers. We also tend to be our worst critics, so it can be nice to get a little ribbon or plaque saying other people think we built a nice model.

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Re: contests: Some people, myself included to some degree, either lack the confidence in their skills to enter a contest (even if objectively, they do great work), or simply aren't big on the competitive atmosphere. In this regard I really like something that happens in the railway modelling community, known as RPM meets (RPM = Railway Prototype Modelling). These are like a contest in that a bunch of people bring their models in to display, but it definitely isn't a contest, either, as there is no judging. Further, unfinished models are more than welcome, too (which is, in honesty, the majority of what I've taken to such meets): the point of the meets is to socialise and exchange knowledge, both of the prototype and modelling. I've met quite a few good folks at such meets and learned many useful tips and tricks for improving my modelling. I wouldn't feel comfortable in entering a contest, though, as my painting skills are poor and I don't have the facility for airbrushing.

As for accuracy, for me it depends on A, the subject of the model, and B, my mood. Sometimes I just want to build for fun (more often than not), and in those cases, I'll do the best I can with a kit as it comes out of the box, with maybe some extra decals. If the subject is something I really care about, I'll go as all-out as I can with regards to accuracy - though usually this means filing or filling to get shapes right, or using sheet and strip styrene to build/modify, more than using aftermarket parts (which are expensive, and my finances aren't as good as those of some others).

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Some people, myself included to some degree, either lack the confidence in their skills to enter a contest (even if objectively, they do great work), or simply aren't big on the competitive atmosphere.

That was exactly my point. You do NOT need expert skills to enter contests. In my mind, the point of entering a contest isn't to win; it's simply to show your models to other modelers. The only thing a modeler enjoys as much as building models is looking at other people's models!

A display-only show is a good idea. It would be interesting to see a club test that concept. (It was tried in the figure painting community 10-15 years ago, but it failed to generate interest.) In the meantime, if you don't want to compete, I would encourage you to pay the modest entry fee at the next local show and put a note next to your models that says "Not For Competition."

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Clif,

For me it depends on mood and the subject matter. I always build for myself and my own pleasure and satiffaction.

I keep my focus on the main goal ......enjoying the experience of scale modelling. This is a hobby for pleasure. Each of us has our own goals in this hobby relating to accuracy.

The main goal is to build your models so you get the maximum pleasure from the hobby..........what others think is very much a non-issue. The goal is to get as many grins per hour as you can from this hobby or any other hobby. If building OOB gives you the maximum grins that that is what you want to do. If you get the maximum amount of pleasure from using aftermarket then go that route..........and if you get the most joy from taking the worst kit and scratchbuilding and fixing every aspect of it to turn it into a show piece that will make other people quit the hobby.....then go that route.

But always keep your focus on your main goal......maximum pleasure.....never build to satisfy others.......that will ruin the hobby for you.

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In this regard I really like something that happens in the railway modelling community, known as RPM meets (RPM = Railway Prototype Modelling). These are like a contest in that a bunch of people bring their models in to display, but it definitely isn't a contest, either, as there is no judging.

This sounds a lot like the NNL shows for car modelers. there are quite a few around the US. Although some do include an award or two, the point is the models, not competition. They were originally set up as non-contests but the competitive nature of some drove most of the shows to at least offer a fan favorite type of award (everyone that shows up can vote for their favorite), but nobody really seems to care or even know who won it most years. I really think it is a shame it is not common for other model types as it offers most of the benefit of a contest, but without prizes feels more open for people to just show off their stuff. NNL West is the only one I attend (relatively close by) and most years there are at least 500-1000 models shown.

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As Wingspan states it's just a hobby and just for fun, but I know a lot of you guys take it very seriously and as for 'uberbuilds' I don't have the skills but I envy and admire those that do.

As such I don't build replicas, I build representations - a subtle difference. I never buy aftermarket products with the exception of decals. I'm one of those ( and there many on this and other forums ) who build OOB, it's my hobby and I take the viewpoint that if it's supposed to be a Spitfire and it looks like a Spitfire then that's good enough for me.

Regards

Brian

I think Brian has summed up my ethos when it comes to modelling. I do it for me, if it fits the TLAR(that looks about right) rule, I'm happy with it. Yes, I've bought some after market bits but mainly to make it easier for me to meet the above criteria. I admire to bits those who turn out flawless masterpieces without having any urge to emulate them. My weathering normally consistes of a paint scheme not quite as good as I'd like. I can't see pre shading & washes featuring large in my repetoire any time soon. Hell, even with that I don't get as much done as I'd like, so heaven help me if I ever desert the one true scale (1/72) :thumbsup: for larger scales & hyper detailing.

Steve.

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I build strictly to please myself. I do have standards, but they are very relaxed standards compared to most model work typically seen online. I am interested in the shapes, colors and markings of airplanes--interior details, etc, bore me to tears, so I spend very little time detailing cockpits, etc. My basic philosophy is if it can't easily be seen when the model is sitting on a shelf there is no point at all spending any time detailing it. I will add just enough detail to a cockpit (typically seatbelts), so if a casual observer glances in the direction of the cockpit they will see something more than just an empty black hole. For the same reason, I waste no time detailing wheel wells--they will never be seen once the model is sitting on the shelf. I have very little time for modeling, and even when I do get a chance to model, I tend to work very slowly. Life is short. I would rather have a nice collection of completed models that please me, instead of a few museum pieces that will impress others.

To answer the OP's question--the only "should" in modeling is to build models to a standard that will please you. No one has the right to tell anyone else how a model "should" be completed, or what 'should" be done to make a proper model (or modeler).

If you don't want to spend time detailing the parts of models that won't be seen--don't. OTOH, if detailing gives you joy, then do it. It's as simple as that.

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There are times that I build OOB, and just to pass time. There are the models like the Lysander i am doing now where I am really yearning to try my hand at some of the newly obtained knowledge I have absorbed from either here, or from my subscription to FSM that my wife gets me every yr for x-mas. I have entered a model in one contest in my life, mostly because of my locations and there never being anywhere near to travel to. There has never really been IPMS clubs near me except for once or twice while in Reigina, sask, I attended a few meetings actually winning the door prize sitting on my display shelf...1/72 hasagawa phantom. The contest I entered was when I was 15, in air cadets, all hand painted, and it was....of course....1/48 phantom and it took 2nd place. Now living south of the twin cities I would like to attend an IPMS club meeting in St Paul sometime soon.

To sum up the answer to your question, I build because I love it, I love the history, I love the tinkering and fideling....sometimes..lol.....but I love having an outlet to let my artistic talents soar.

And to be absolutley honest......my dad told me I never had the grades to be a pilot.....so I took the easy wayout as a grunt / trooper. I have my private license......but even at almost 40......I would be lying if I said there was never a time in ANY build where I do not lean back in my chair and daydream about flying the builds I am doing. I am a kid at heart, and always will be.

Edited by RescueDiver
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Id always admit that competition brings out the best of us. It forces one to greater achievements.

But the original intent was for home display, not the competitive arena. With no one to look at em but you, your significant other and perhaps the cat, you only have to please yourself. So decide what you like, and make that happen.

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.......But the original intent was for home display, not the competitive arena. .....

Clif,

I apologize. I did not read your original post well.

If all I was ever going to do was build for my shelves and never enter in any kind of competition, I would personally do as little to the models as I could get away with and still be happy. I'm the type of person who likes to see quantity of models on my shelves. I'm also of the opinion that a good paint job can overcome a multitude of sins in the actual build. The majority of people see the paint and the decals. I'd bet that 75%+ of the "non-modelers" who look at my builds never even look in the cockpit to see how I painted it, or don't look in the intake to see if my seams are perfect. They want to see the "big picture", which boils down to exterior paint and decals. If you can wow them with paint or a bunch of cool markings, then you've done a great job with the model. Most people who might ever gaze upon your shelves will never care if your HUD is correct or the wheels are accurate for that airframe....they just want to see it pained up really nicely. However, it all boils down to making yourself happy, and that all boils down to your personality.

I've recently gotten back into OOB builds, not only to save money, but to get back to the heart of this hobby.....which is to have fun. Sawing on a kit to fit resin or spending hours bending tiny pieces of photo-etch started to wear on me and sapped my zeal for the hobby. I'm cranking out 3 kits right now that are all OOB except for resin bang seats (which take zero talent or extra time, but do add that extra "busy-ness" to the cockpit I like to see). These three kits are stress-relieving builds meant to get me back in love with the hobby. I'm sure I will get back into some difficult builds next time.....right now I just wasn't up to it.

I've seen a lot of threads lately about people falling out of the hobby or being in a "modeling funk". I know what they mean. Earlier this year, I built a Israeli Saraf from the 1/48 Hasegawa kit, Aires pit, and Isracast conversion and decals. It took a ton of work to get everything to fit, not to mention the inherent "fiddly bits" that come with a helicopter, and I still wasn't 100% pleased with the final results. To put it plainly, that build broke me. I finished that kit in February and am just now getting back to gluing plastic. I got caught up in super detailing a kit and lost the fun factor. Since my favorite part is painting and decaling, that's where I spend most of my time.

Do what makes Clif happy. If you can build a kit and walk away content and proud, then you did what was right for you.

Happy modeling.

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To answer the OP's question--the only "should" in modeling is to build models to a standard that will please you. No one has the right to tell anyone else how a model "should" be completed, or what 'should" be done to make a proper model (or modeler).

Echo this. Vive la difference! By contrast, I love detailing cockpits, wheel bays etc because it's creative, and you really would see something more than a flat blank for a wheel bay on anything 144th or bigger. And finally because I build to build, rather than collect, so I would rather have a half dozen really good models to my name than cases of less well done ones. But I agree completely otherwise: for things built for myself I aspire to two (low) ideals:

1. Looks decent from suitable viewing distance (e.g. 3 feet).

2. Better than the last one (however trivially.)

The final judge - the little nagging voice that tells you about not bothering to do something to a standard you could have - is and should only be your own ;)

Patrick

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I personally enjoy building to accuracy and authenticity but there have been a time or two where I have deviated from this preference on a little thing or two.

I consider this hobby an activity and not a means to decorate the house: it was always a means to keep me busy, challenged and entertained and the goal was not to make a collection of things to be displayed/stored. Thus, most of my builds eventually find their way into the trash and I keep only those few that I consider the best. The activity of the build gets me my money's worth. Having said that, I have not built anything in 2-years due to many extracurricular things.

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