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Frankhenrylee

Wear'N'Tear

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I posted a topic about weathering that opened up a huge can of worms. Not looking for that here, please no criticisms of others ideas or preferences. What I'd like to hear about are what your tricks are for doing different types of wear and tear on airplanes. For instance how do you do exhaust stains, paint chipping/fading, oil streaking, or anything else that you feel really brings the model to life. I've stumbled around with a whole lot of trial and error and am looking for some new things to try. Please don't limit the ideas to what I have mentioned, almost anything goes, no right or wrong answers here.

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Topic I wanted to see for a long time ;)

What about moderators pin it and group useful stuff, like give a name exhaust stain-progress pic of getting it with all the tools? Something like there is in tools and tips section of main site, but if someone expirienced could make straight every step by step with pics. And for other stuff aswell(chipping/fading)...

Maybe I'm asking too much but I hope somebody will respond positively

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I did some post shading with Tamiya Smoke on the 1/32 Hunter I am building. It is subtle but breaks up the color. I thinned the smoke a lot and sprayed it ever so slightly (I could see it drying about 1 second after it hit the model) building it up to get the effect I wanted

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Good idea!

Here is my contribution.

Oil stains: use black oil paint mixed with A LOT of thinner and apply the mixture with the tip of the toothpick. Capillarity will do its job and the stain will spread like the real thing.

Edited by toniosky

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I thought there'd be a little better response to this post but oh well. I don't have much to offer as far as tricks go but I came across something the other day that is kind of counter intuitive. Clear coats can be troublesome because of the fact that they are hard to tell how thick your putting them on. I've found that it actually helps to have just one lamp on during this process to help you see the glare of the wet coat on the model. If you have multiple lamps on the glare can be harder to find. I think the type of bulb has an effect on that too. I'm still experimenting with that one though. Oh yeah, Alclad's new Aqua Gloss is the new Future, it's awesome, doesn't fog from decals setting solutions like Future will from time to time. Dries faster as well, you can shoot it on and decal an hour later.

Edited by Frankhenrylee

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I made up a 1/72 Hasegawa A6M3 a while back and used Humbrol Maskol (thinned with water)applied with a toothpick to get individual chips but small brush and chipped away at the layer of Maskol to simulate peeled areas.

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I posted a topic about weathering that opened up a huge can of worms. Not looking for that here, please no criticisms of others ideas or preferences. What I'd like to hear about are what your tricks are for doing different types of wear and tear on airplanes. For instance how do you do exhaust stains, paint chipping/fading, oil streaking, or anything else that you feel really brings the model to life. I've stumbled around with a whole lot of trial and error and am looking for some new things to try. Please don't limit the ideas to what I have mentioned, almost anything goes, no right or wrong answers here.

Open ended questions like these usually do open up a can of worms, you'll end up having a thread with a whole bowel movement of ideas that will be one big mess to sift through.

The question your asking is the basis for a website like this and cannot begin to be addressed in one thread.

It's best to address each area in a separate thread, or if you are so inclined to put together a list of your techniques and assemble them in a logical manner.

Curt

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I have been waiting for a topic like this for a while now, The capillary technique I use to do using Humbrol 33 and turps and a fine point brush, works reeeaallly well on the big engines Tamiya use to make for their motorbikes in 1/12th. Usual dry brushing of Gun metal, Humbrol paints over Tamiya sprays, Blue tack for masking, ( works really well on Luftwaffe camo... sky blue all over then mask and dot up using the blue tack, try different spray angles for " feathering"), used mainly Tamiya sprays don't have an airbrush, but now as i have the Tamiya make up kits I'm finding they dilute well with water , and can do some fine work,just have to make sure to seal the paint before you detail as it seems to "stick" more on clean up, so a light/good coat of semi gloss helps the process. the contrast between Tamiya semi gloss clear and model Master flat coat is GREAT!!!!... I'm still learning and have as we speak managed to aquire a Revell kit of Nikki Lauders 75 Ferrari, which A was cheap... and B: is a ( I'm sure!!!!) remold of a Protar kit minus the gearbox detail and the piston and crank detail... but with everything else. Have trouble applying light coats of Model Master flat coat... seems to like going on in one hit and a bit on the thick side. I have only tried figures a few times and got into the whole preshading of skin and uniforms, mixing of paints for light and shadow, only just recently "branching out" so to speak!

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Wish I could read Spanish!

Really.

I always see things like that on fading and chipping, but I never can get it right when I do it myself.

I always have trouble with where to apply the fading and how much. The same with chipping. It always seems kind of random when done right, but "random" is very hard to replicate for me.

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My contribution:

- Heavy oil and grime stains/streaks on lower fuselage near jet exhausts: mix artist's oil black and burnt umber, thin with turpentine, rub on fingertip, then rub finger on the area you want weathered. Alternatively, thin the same oil paint into a wash, apply generously on the target area, then rub the area with your fingers. If too heavy, let the oil paint/wash to dry, then tone down with cotton-bud dampened with turp (damp, not wet).

- Panel line highlight + random grime: mix artist's oil black and burnt umber with LOTS of turpentine to make a wash. Use fine-tipped brush to apply the wash on panel lines. Once finished with highlighting panel lines, do not wait for wash to dry, immediately pick up a new cotton bud and start cleaning up excess wash, by lightly rubbing along air flow, which should produce subtle grime/oil streaky effect. This technique can also be used after oil wash is dry by dampening the cotton bud with turpentine, making sure the cotton bud is well-squeezed after being dipped in turp.

EDIT: forgot to add, both methods above require clear gloss coat to work, then "sealed" with another clear coat (gloss, semi gloss, or flat... your choice).

HTH.

Edited by Mike C

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Maybe we should also add pictures :woot.gif: Like concise tutorials

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I've been messing around with using pencils for effects that I need more control over. I have found that a gloss coat is a must for this as anything less will really soak up the color. They have watercolor and pastel pencils along with the regular ones. Very controllable, just like a lot of things if you don't like it, rub it off with a damp cloth or use a wet brush to tone it down or drag it. The only problem is I'll probably have to buy one of those huge sets to get all of the colors I'd like to have.

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