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Tiger27

F-4E Phantom II NJ ANG Hasegawa 1/48th

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Another one done.. I have to much free time on my hand. I've been off work for some time now after i ripped a muscle in my hip/@ss... and when it mended it had got an infection in the same muscle area.. and it hurts like hell..

Anyhow.. I have time to kill and there is not much else to do but modell.. I can get 5-8 hours or more of modeling done a day so you can imagine.

This is the Hasegawa F-4E in '48th. It's built with the exeption of quickboost resin boom-seats totally OOB. I got some aftermarket decals for SJ Phantoms. But decided to go with the Tiger one from NJ Ang. I can easly do another cupple of F-4's , this kit was almost to easy and filling/sanding was kept to an absolute minimum.

Paints used Gunze, Tamiya and Vallejo acryllics. Tamiya Modelmaster weathering set and MIG Wash.

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Edited by Tiger27

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Tiger - this was the NJ-ANG unit at McQuire AFB? 141st I think?<br>

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I have no idea. It says N J ANG and that's about it. I don't know to much about phantom, let alone the history of the squadrons. I wish I did though :)

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I have no idea. It says N J ANG and that's about it. I don't know to much about phantom, let alone the history of the squadrons. I wish I did though :)

I did look it up...Yup, 534 was a member of the 141st at McQuire. My old man was a member of the sister squadron, the 119th at Atlantic City.

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I did look it up...Yup, 534 was a member of the 141st at McQuire. My old man was a member of the sister squadron, the 119th at Atlantic City.

Pretty good model for someone who knows nothing about Phantoms. If you'd like some pointers on modeling the F-4 let us know, several people here know quite a bit about the jet. Prior to McGuire, 68-0534 was at Ramstein in the 526 TFS where I got to spend some quality time with her (I was a comm-nav avionics tech working on F-4Es in the 526 Tactical Fighter Squadron):

68-0534ZaragozaJuly191983ScottRWilson.jpg

68-0534RamsteinSept181985ScottRWilson.jpg

Here's a photo by John Binford taken not long after 534 transferred from Ramstein. Note the RBF flag hanging from the gun bay door. That tells the arm crew at EOR to arm the gun. For normal training sorties the gun was left safed.:

68-0534March141987JohnBinford.jpg

Edited by Scott R Wilson

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Hey Scott , thanx for very intresting pics and story. I'd love to know more about the Phantom on my next build. I have some more planned.C, E's and G from USAF, IAF, EJ from Japan and F- from Germany. Also a cupple of navy jets, I have an N with VF-84 decals in my stash and itching to get it started. gotta finish an JASDF F-2 Viper zero first though ;)

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Pretty good model for someone who knows nothing about Phantoms. If you'd like some pointers on modeling the F-4 let us know, several people here know quite a bit about the jet. Prior to McGuire, 68-0534 was at Ramstein in the 526 TFS where I got to spend some quality time with her (I was a comm-nav avionics tech working on F-4Es in the 526 Tactical Fighter Squadron):

68-0534RamsteinSept181985ScottRWilson.jpg

Hi Scott - is that you in the cockpit? :blink:

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....and, here is an F-4J (Tamiya 1:32), that I finished in '07.....

AW1_0897_75lbBlue.jpg

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Hi Scott - is that you in the cockpit? :blink:

No, I was behind the camera. I took both of the photos of 534 in 526 TFS markings. The top one was at Zaragoza AB, Spain, the second photo was back at Ramstein with 534 on the engine trim pad. I wasn't engine run qualified, but I did get to sit in the back seat for several runs. It was noisy and the plane shakes alot, but otherwise not much excitement. Well, there was the time a big red hornet came flying by and got too close to the intake run screen on the left side. The suction pulled him tight against the screen, and the hornet started trying to crawl across the screen. There was enough suction that honeybees that flew too close would bet pulled into the engine, sometimes having their bodies pulled in two across one of the wires the screen was made of. The hornet was much tougher, he was struggling but managing to move slowly scross the screen. Anyway, when I heard the guy in the front seat and the guy underneath the jet doing the adjustments on the engine say they were done and were going to shut down the engines, I told the guy in front about the hornet. He turned around and looked, and his eyes got pretty big. We decided to close the canopies before shutting down. As the engines spooled down and the suction lessened, the hornet flew off the screen, buzzed around as though mighty ticked off and looking for something to sting, then finally it flew away. I wish I'd had my camera that day.

Scott W.

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