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Space Shuttle Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6 (1:144)


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Hello everybody,

 

let's get on with it! cool.gif

 

As it is said in a Bible verse, "He who seeks finds". 

 

And so I've actually made a find in my extensive SSWS collection. It doesn't always have to be brilliant HiRes. reference photos, but rather as in this case the following schematic representation of this branched pipe system at the foot of the water tower, from which the different pipe diameters are to be seen,  speak_cool.gif of which the diameter 114" = 2,9 m ≙ Ø 18 mm (1:160) can be used as a reference dimension for drawing of the water tank, which I've also done then. 

 

XmBys8.jpg
Source: capcomespace.net

 

In addition, the clear display shows which SSWS systems in the Flame Trench and the MLP are served with water by the two 84'' pipes.  These are the said pipes with a diameter 2,1 m ≙ Ø 13 mm (1:160), which one can see very nicely in this Street View panorama, as well as the changing diameter of the pipes following to the tower. 

 

I0G9zX.jpg
Source: google.com/maps

 

And with this diameter (114'' ≙ Ø 18 mm (1:160) as a reference dimension, I was able to determine the different diameters of the water tank (blue) that I need for scratching.  up040577.gif

 

teUqsE.jpg
Source: NASA

 

The required heights I've determined  from this photo, in which I used the height of the tower as a reference measure.

 

jBYn23.jpg
Source: NASA

 

When drawing the top view of the water tank for the diorama, one must note that the tank stands on a support structure consisting of five steel pipes that has a pentagonal floor plan, which is why I also had to deal with the designing a Pentagon , which is by no means trivial, but fortunately there are instructions for this. 

 

tqLI9J.jpg

 

In this image some details are drawn in that will be taken into account later when scratching. At the rear support tube there is a ladder with a protective cage , which leads up to the railing on the top of the water tank,

 

ehrfiJ.jpg

 

which I've only recently recognized on closer inspection in this image.

 

WYOqn4.jpg
Source: google.com/maps

 

On the pipe distribution system there are also 13 lamps, which would certainly also be attractive to scratch, which one can see on this panorama. 

 

VdpcwF.jpg
Source: nasatech.net

 

And since we are back to the lighting, here is a picture in which the foundations of the four Floodlight masts of the pad lighting are glued on. 

 

Dv64IB.jpg

 

RE6I4w.jpg

Source: NASA

 

But that's supposed to have been for the present with the Diorama plan, especially since the Dio will sound the bell for the Final countdown of my project, which is still a long way away ... up040577.gif

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31 minutes ago, spaceman said:

But that's supposed to have been for the present with the Diorama plan, especially since the Dio will sound the bell for the Final countdown of my project, which is still a long way away ... up040577.gif

I hope I'll live to see the end of your project... 😂

Do you keep count of the days or even hours you work in this? I mean, it's not like you worked 8 years full time, you had some 'time off'. 

If you're going to build that diorama around it, it's going to be even more epic than I thought. When you finish, make sure to send NASA pictures of your work. I'm sure they'll like it a lot.

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Posted (edited)

Thanks Mike for your nice compliments. :worship:

 

Time is a relative term, and I just keep surprising how quickly another year has passed, but what doesn't count for me, it's simply a joy ride ... up035091.gif

 

Therefore, you will have to wait a few more years for completion, and therefore stay tuned! up040577.gif

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Posted (edited)

Hello everybody,

to err is human, said the hedgehog, getting off the brush ... 

If in doubt, I always ask James MacLaren, and so this time too, whether he also had been once at the Water tank tower and has seen a Ladder with protective cage as I has suspected it.  hmmm.gif

 

And lo and behold, he was actually there once and says, that the ladder there probably had no protective cage according to his memory. Accordingly, there were ladders with protective cages on the Launch pad, such as also at both corners of the MLP (Side 1), as well as without, wherefore there were apparently no uniform regulations. rolleyes.gif

 

In the case of longer ladders, the pad climbers were secured using a safety wire rope with fall protection, as is also used by mountaineers. 

 

The little house on top of the tank, which I also asked him about, was a screened enclosure to keep birds and bats out, and perhaps people too, especially since inside of it, the top of the tank has a large opening. 

 

So far, so good, although from the point of view of German safety regulations I was surprised with the missing protective cage at this height. 

 

By chance I also still found a confirmation that the ladder at the water tower actually has no protective cage, for which this GigaPan panorama has furnished evidence for, what I have saved in my optical memory, because it has an incredible resolution in the zoom.  yikes.gif

 

ejKiOx.jpg 

 

Originally I wanted with the help of the perfect direct view and the known height of the High Pressure Gas Battery of 32 ft = 9,75 m ≙ 61 mm (1:160) only determine the height of the Launch pad area of the diorama. 

 

On the occasion I also looked at the water tower and when I zoomed up I was amazed at the superb detail resolution,  since one can now see what the ladder of the tower really looks like from the bottom until the roof of the house on top of the tank and up to the navigation light, and that it has no protective cage. 

 

WGYWTZ.jpg
Source: GigaPan

 

lssrTl.jpg

 

gaCQyz.jpg

 

As one can see, a continuous strand/rod runs above the middle of the rungs over the entire length of the ladder, on which one can probably secure himself with a fall protection device.   huh.gif 

Since the length of the Gas Battery, 110 ft = 33,5 m ≙ 210 mm (1:160), and its width, 56 ft = 17,1 m ≙ 107 mm (1:160), already have been drawn into the diorama plan, 

 

K9XH6j.jpg

 

I have drawn the height 32 ft = 9,8 m ≙ 61 mm (1:160) into this GigaPan section and determined the height from the Dio floor to the pad surface, which is approx. 76 mm and thus roughly corresponds to the depth of the Flame Trench, 42 ft = 12,8 m ≙ 80 mm (1:160). speak_cool.gif

 

gcI0Ee.jpg

 

And with that I would like to definitely conclude the planning phase of the diorama. up040577.gif

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17 hours ago, spaceman said:

OMG Kirk, what a cool joke!!! :yahoo:

Notice I didn't say which Christmas.

Anyway, as a spectator, this is far more about the journey than the destination. There would simply be far too much detail to take in of the finished model to do more than scratch the surface of the magnificent work that is being put into its creation. Provided I'm still around to see it, the longer this takes the better.

 

By the way, alongside the lighting effects, have you had any thoughts about adding sound to the diorama? I appreciate that this is not being depicted at the earth-shattering moment of launch (think of all that cotton wool you'd need) but I'd imagine that there are some quite distinctive sounds associated with announcements, fluid transfers PA announcements etc during the countdown. Just a thought - in case you run out of things to include in the project scope...

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Posted (edited)

Thanks Kirk for your suggestions, :worship: but I haven't thought about sound effects yet, but from today's perspective none are planned. up040577.gif

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Posted (edited)

Hello everybody,

 

is there anybody in there? :hmmm:

 

I want to come back briefly to the Launch pad lighting once more, which I have assumed so far to consist of four Floodlight masts at the corners of the pad, but unfortunately the following photo does not show enough details. rolleyes.gif

 

02R0Pr.jpg
Source: spacefacts.de

 

The foundations of the masts I had already glued into my Diorama plan.

 

G15iUp.jpg

 

To scratch these masts one needs more detailed photos, which one can also find indeed, such like these ones here, whereby I always have to consider their historical relevance. cool.gif

 

8BoJV6.jpg
Source: NASA

 

sCRadW.jpg
Source: NASA

 

This is what the masts looked like only in the second half of the shuttle program, while on photos of the first missions, like here during a so-called Flight Readiness Firing (FRF) during the preparations for the launch of the Challenger to her first mission (STS-6) one can see that the masts at that time were higher, but far more spartan and, in contrast to the later modernized main masts, had not 9 + 3, but only 6 Flood light lamps (4 above, 2 below). huh.gif

 

IlVNDS.jpg
Source: NASA

 

Fortunately, there are more precise images of the extensively documented STS-1 mission, as one can see here, on which one can even see the rungs on the mast for the pad climbers. Huch

 

P5T16Z.jpg
Source: NASA

 

These details look pretty good, but unfortunately they are not enough for scratching, since one has no clear reference measure to which one can refer all dimensions when converting.  

 

So I've searched further and found this STS-1 photo here, on which one can now see important details that are crucial for scratching the floodlight masts, which one can see more clearly in the zoom. speak_cool.gif

 

oP8JvP.jpg
Source: NASA

 

A first important finding from this is this one, that in addition to the four floodlight masts found so far, there is also a 5th Mast, which stands directly in front of the Gas battery bunker, is slightly lower than the other four masts and has only four flood lights. 

 

Even more important, however, is the fact that with the height of the bunker of 32 ft ≙ 61 mm (1:160) I now also have a reliable reference measure with which I can determine the height of this mast (128 mm) as well as the dimensions of the spotlight holder.  

 

jw1owx.jpg
Source: NASA

 

On the other hand, by using this mast height as a reference measure I was able to determine now also the height of the four longer main masts via the Mast 1, which is 144 mm.  

 

jC4qjz.jpg

 

One can also see that there are lamps on all ceilings of the Bunker cells, which means that another LED circle is required, but what has already been considered by my friend Arno (McPhönix) as a reserve in his Multi-power bank. bow.gif

 

And as optical details one can see in this photo that the large gas containers in contrast to the shown GigaPan-Panorama had a gray paintwork during the first missions in the early 80s, and that there was no container in the 3rd cell (behind the mast), what is explained by the fact that the GigaPan-Panorama shows the Discovery before her last launch for the STS-133 (2011). 

 

As one can see on this panorama, this mast (red) was modified in the following years and afterwards only had two smaller Flood lamps. But there is a further Floodlight mast (yellow) on the Gas battery with 9 Flood lights, which one can see better in the following nasatech.net panorama, but what doesn't interest me any further, as it didn't exist yet 1983. 

 

vtwQjI.jpg

 

What interests me, however, is the position of the base point of this mast in front of the battery in order to be able to decide whether it is still on my diorama floor plan or not. 

 

TwahyU.jpg
Source: nasatech.net

 

And after I took another look at my first photo from the STS-6 Rollout, one can also recognize this 5th Mast that was already existing there back then exactly at the same place,

 

3QuTVL.jpg

 

so that I could also determine its base point. And that is situated indeed on the front edge of my Dio, so that I can now also consider this mast in my pad lighting, provided my friend also has considered a Floodlight LED-Circle for it in reserve too. hmmm.gif

 

And finally, one more thing that I was very surprised about at first, because on a Google Map (2012) the mast, which was still visible at this point in the GigaPan panorama (2011), one year after the last shuttle mission (STS-135) was already no longer there, as one can see here. huh.gif

 

cap5xz.jpg

 

The final proof of this is provided by this nasatech.net panorama, which was updated lastly after the end of the shuttle program, on which only the foundation of the mast with cut cables can still be seen at this point ... analintruder.gif

 

Mr61ry.jpg
Source: NASA

 

With this impressions I can for now finally roll in my Diorama plan and instead roll out the carpet that my Gino likes to lie on. up040577.gif

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Hello friends,

 

since my Multi-power bank still has a floodlight LED circuit in reserve, I've swarmed out again and actually still have found a 6th Mast on the pad, at this already known location next to the building, about its purpose I had reported September 17, about which, according to James MacLaren, one could get by elevator or stairwell to the Pad Terminal Connection Room on the ground floor.

 

 

6hbhaX.jpg
Source: Google Maps - Street View

 

And next to the building there is actually a Floodlight mast (6), which illuminates the FSS/RSS rear, wherewith the 6th Mast of the Pad lighting would be found, which can still be fed by the power bank. speak_cool.gif

 

The crucial question is only whether this mast was already there during STS-6, which I suspect. And that's why I will now look for photos from this time that provide information about whether the mast come into question for my Diorama or not. up040577.gif 

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Hello everybody,

 

since I now know which point on the pad to pay attention to, I've first viewed my STS-6 photos, and already on this photo from the Rollout, on which one can see the back of the pad behind the RSS, one can actually see the contours of a further Mast (6) at this point, albeit blurred, next to the building in question. 

 

Lfy1KR.jpg
Source: NASA

 

More accurate information about this 6th Floodlight mast then again gave photos of the STS-1 like this one, on which in the zoom one can clearly see the illuminated mast behind the building, 

 

sCKvue.jpg
Source: NASA

 

as well as in these images. speak_cool.gif

 

BeTD90.jpg
Source: NASA

 

aRtkvO.jpg
Source: NASA

 

Therewith the available 6 Floodlight LED circuits of the power bank are now exhausted, so that I don't need to look any further.  
Rien ne va plus - Nothing works anymore! up040577.gif

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Hello everybody,

 

after we have meanwhile decided a separate power supply for the Crawler lighting by means of three built-in 9V Batteries, the analysis and inventory of the lamps located on the crawler is now the next step for the definition of the corresponding LED switching circuits, which, however, should become a bit difficult, since there are almost no photos from the STS-6 in which one can see the illuminated crawler.  hmmm.gif

 

Only on this photo during Challenger's rollout (11/30/1982) from the VAB one can see the crawler, on the front of which (Side 1) one can see 8 lamps, at least something!   

 

U6ZwcI.jpg
Source: forum.nasaspaceflight.com (jacqmans)

 

Of this rollout there is also the following Video, on which unfortunately a lot was disappearing in the fog ... rolleyes.gif

 

Therin in a few short sequences, like this one, one can make out a few lamps, but the position of which can only be guessed. 

 

pIjck4.jpg

 

Photos from later missions, like here from the STS-132

 

4971242851_084d25a756_b.jpg
Source: live.staticflickr.com (Ben Cooper)

 

or here from Endeavour's rollout to her last mission STS-134 are helpful, but there are a number of lamps there which were not yet present on the crawler during  STS-6, which must be taken into account when taking stock of the lamps. huh.gif

 

5517115259_44d5052421_b.jpg
Source: live.staticflickr.com (Ben Cooper)

 

Therefore, I firstly had to orientate myself on images from subsequent missions, such as this one during the Challenger rollout, STS-8 (30/08/1983), on which one can see the back (Side 3) of the crawler. 

 

wZVrB5.jpg
Source: forum.nasaspaceflight.com

 

This photo of the STS-28 (1989) is quite suitable for the analysis, on which one can even see some lamps on the inner sides of the Trucks.  speak_cool.gif

 

16504088485_8436aecf94_b.jpg
Source: flickr.com/photos/nasacommons

 

The difficulty with the inventory is now to disregard those lamps in the counting that did not yet exist during STS-6, such as these ones during STS-134.  hmmm.gif

 

6gdsDY.jpg

 

These are Fluorescent tubes, which are located immediately in front of and behind each of the 8 Trucks, which are mounted at elongated Lubrication jigs for lubricating of the truck chains, as one can see in this image. 

 

97jitc.jpg
Source: NASA

 

As one can see in this image during the STS-28, these lubrication jigs were already present on the STS-6 Crawler, but the fluorescent tubes weren't still there, because they were just retrofitted later. 

 

ZqvIoP.jpg

 

The exact inventory of the lamps will follow in the next step. up040577.gif 

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On 10/4/2020 at 9:21 PM, spaceman said:

Thanks Kirk for your suggestions, :worship: but I haven't thought about sound effects yet, but from today's perspective none are planned. up040577.gif

If you at one point think about sound effects, you might want to store this somewhere for future reference.

 

I'd like to include some sound effects in my Challenger display, and an Arduino mini computer/controller (ít's more controller, not a computer like Raspberry Pi) is suited for that. They're super cheap and there's so much reference on the internet that you don't really need programming skills (just copy/paste skills and some common sense). I found this Youtube video about a simple MP3 player. This one features a simple play/pause button and next/previous track buttons. This could be simply re-programmed to play three dedicated sound clips. Or more/less, depending on what you want. If you really want to go wild, you could let the Arduino control the lighting depending on what sound clip is played.

 

 

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3 hours ago, mikephilippens said:

an Arduino mini computer/controller

 

Exactly what I was thinking Mike! Small, simple, yet very flexible. Probably not up to the job of replicating the guidance computer though.

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24 minutes ago, CaptKirk said:

 

Exactly what I was thinking Mike! Small, simple, yet very flexible. Probably not up to the job of replicating the guidance computer though.

You'd need a few Raspberry Pi's for that, together with a bunch of Arduino's. Remember that the Shuttle was designed in the 60's/70's, so the computer power is not that extreme. The processor in 1 of the computers was rated at 480.000 instructions per second. The computing power of the Pi 3 goes beyond 2400 MIPS (Million instructions per second).

But those comparisons are useless I guess. Just take it as a fun fact 🙂

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Thanks Mike and Kirk for your sound inspiration again, :worship:  but that's all still up in the air and would be the very last chapter for me I could deal with when I will have finished my project ... :hmmm:

 

But in the moment I have my hands full with the tricky Lighting chapter, which is a rather great challenge. up040577.gif

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My Goodness Manfred ... I've been away from the board for a few weeks and now I see this NEW project??

 

I've been asked to teach Painting to members of the local Art Centres down here near Niagara Falls Canada and have been focussed on this all summer ... and we've been pleased to have a good response during this Virus stuff. So my attention has been elsewhere ... and I haven't even sat at my Modelling desk since June ...

 

But I'm astounded at the new project, within a major project, that you're proceeding with. I'm very happy to see you continuing with this but it amazes me that you're keeping your interest up, your researching effort, without taking a lo-o-ong break.

 

And ... sad to say, you're the only one posting any new builds and keeping our beloved forum from collecting dust. As you asked, "Is anybody out there?" Where'd everybody go? When we all got affected by this Virus, many months ago, I assumed we'd all be building new models and reducing our stash, but the opposite has occurred ... this is most interesting.

 

Manfred, keep up the impressive work on this diorama ... I still have more classes to teach so won't be building anything new for a few more weeks, but I'll still be watching your progress here!

 

Pete

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Thanks Pete for your nice words and for your compliments for my Diorama plan presentation. :worship: I missed you already my friend, and the other guys too ... 

 

Yep, it has become really quiet here, but everyone has enough to do with themselves in these difficult times, what feels somehow like an unreal time ... :hmmm:

 

I'm trying to distract myself from that by going on, that's why my first steps into the Diorama chapter were a welcome occasion too. :whistle:

 

Staying healthy all together. up040577.gif

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Hello everybody,

 

and so now to the result of the analysis and the final inventory control of the Crawler lighting, which is now fixed and can be seen in the following image, which however does not show the STS-6 Crawler, but the Crawler CT-2 that was upgraded for the SLS Program. cool.gif

 

SZ3lzr.jpg[/img]
Source: NASA

 

The total 29 Lamps of the former STS-6 Crawler are distributed as follows:

 

Driver's cabs: 2
JEL-Hydraulics: 8    
Trucks (out-/inside): 8    
Sidewalls: 2/2 Beacons
Front side (Side 3): 3    
Back side: (Side 1): 4

 

And this result actually corresponds to my initial estimate of approx. 30 Lamps.  

 

Just briefly to the explanation of NASA's designation of the front and back side of the Crawler, which was incorrectly named in my last post. rolleyes.gif

 

The crawler with the MLP drives from the VAB with the Side 3 (front side) in the direction of the Launch pad. Therefore from the south side on the pad one always looks at the Side 1 (back side) of the crawler, which then becomes the front side when it return. huh.gif

 

up073604.jpg
Source: flickr.com/photos/nasacommons

 

The Side 1 of the crawler one can recognize, in difference to the Side 3, by the the stairs platform onto which the MLP stairs can be folded out, which is folded in again after the MLP has been set down onto the Pedestals, before the Crawler returns. up040577.gif

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hello everybody,

 

now it's time to get in touch again.  cool.gif

 

After the analysis and inventory of the lamps on the crawler, I've thought with my friend Arno (McPhönix) behind the scenes about the placement of the electrics for the Crawler and MLP lighting. 

 

And to do this, I first had to familiarize myself more closely with David Maier's Paper Kit and take a closer look at the structure of the crawler, which is based on a fixed substructure in a similar way like the structure of the MLP that time, long, long ago ... hmmm.gif

 

Here one can see the floor plan for the construction of the Crawler support structure and underneath the corresponding principle sketch

 

zcmDDa.jpg

 

as well as my first idea for the placement of the three planned 9V Batteries. cool.gif

 

pqssB7.jpg

 

It can be seen from this that some of the support elements planned would have to be dispensed with in order to create the necessary free space for the batteries. 

 

lbkAfX.jpg
Source: EDU-Craft Diversions (David Maier)

 

In principle, however, this should be feasible because in D. Maier's kit, in contrast to the ingenious Paper Kit (1/96) by Mischa Klement (www.microartwork.com), no internal spaces are provided, which is the construction much simpler and easier. 

 

For comparison, here is a picture from the building report of a US friend in the  Paper Modelers Forum (gene1772), who built this monster crawler out of around 11.000 parts.  shocked.gif

 

JXNVoL.jpg
Source: papermodelers.com/forum (gene1772)

 

And here his masterpiece can be seen in all its beauty.  

 

ymaa7Y.jpg
Source: papermodelers.com/forum (gene1772)

 

 A great help in further building the crawler is the building report of my friend Michael Knobloch (mk310149),  who also built the crawler from the Maier-Paper Kit (1/144), is, exactly as it is provided in the kit, the pictures of which I will refer back to from time to time.  cool.gif

 

After some consideration, we came to this arrangement of the Electrics/Electronics, which is more favorable in terms of the division of the elements, for what the support walls (green) were modified. speak_cool.gif

 

sV68vu.jpg

 

In the meantime, my friend Arno has tinkered on the electronics and specified the circuit board, in which even a warning horn is provided. 

 

MzJrP7.jpg

 

Now I just have to find a convenient place for the exit of the connection cable to the MLP when the Crawler with the MLP is standing in front of the Flame Trench and its power supply is through the batteries of the crawler. 

 

And now still a brief outlook ahead to the building of the Crawler, in which I will proceed similarly to the construction of the MLP and will scratch certain details, which David Maier has left out in his kit or only hinted at it through clever textures. 

 

This concerns, among other things the Underbody of the crawler, on which the lower support structure is only indicated, as one can see here, onto which equipment such as tanks, silencers, filters etc., as well as the exhaust system are simply placed then. rolleyes.gif

 

Okay, now one could say that one can't see the sub-floor anyway, and there are certainly more interesting places on the crawler, but on the other hand, the support structure could be represented relatively easily using suitable profiles. huh.gif

 

o8dnae.jpg
Source: papermodelers.com/forum (mk310149)

 

Instead, other places on the crawler such as the JEL Hydraulic system for lifting and lowering the MLP on the Pedestals are much more distinctive, but also much more difficult for implementation.

 

FgK1Wo.jpg
Source: NASA

 

And this tricky assembly is indicated in a typical way in David Maier's paper kit only by relatively robust structures with 2D textures, which may look pretty good when viewed from a distance, but up close one can see that this is only printed "wallpaper" is as one can see in this picture. hmmm.gif 

 

7H7BK2.jpg
Source: papermodelers.com/forum (mk310149)

 

Then there are also some places with breakthroughs where there are provided only black areas in the kit, as one can see here. rolleyes.gif Strange is also that for the sake of simplicity, black color is provided in the interior in the front and rear open spaces, so that one cannot look into it. undecided.gif

 

Nothing against the Crawler and the other great paper models of my friend Michael Knobloch, who is a passionate paper modeler and a master of the nimble scissors, who is cherishing his hobby above all else. up046933.gif 

 

odg1zk.jpg
Source: papermodelers.com/forum (mk310149)

 

Ultimately, in addition to the question of the effort one wants to make, it is all a matter of taste, about which everyone can judge differently, according to his taste.   

 

So much for today my friends. up040577.gifup040577.gif

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Oh-h-h dear-r-r ... are you really going to build the Crawler too?

 

I had been watching RichO's build on NSF but, it seems he's stalled. At least the last time I checked many months ago ... but his build was most excellent and the Crawler is in my plans as well ... but to discover that you're planning to build this too ... well, I'll be watching much more regularly!

 

And these paper models are looking very nice too!

Pete

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Hi Pete,

 

great that you are also interested in the Crawler, which is of course a part of my Launch Pad Diorama, how should the MLP with the Shuttle stack get onto the ramp otherwise? :whistle:

 

On the other hand, the crawler is such a highly interesting vehicle and a great challenge to build, which is why every effort is worth. :thumbsup:

 

BTW, Rich has built a 1/72 Crawler made of Styrene after his paper crawler started disintegrating, because he lives in Washington ... :hmmm:

 

You can see this Monster Crawler here, even with lighting! :gr_eek2:

 

https://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234959313-apollo-crawler-at-172-scale/ 

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3 hours ago, K2Pete said:

I had been watching RichO's build on NSF but, it seems he's stalled. At least the last time I checked many months ago ... but his build was most excellent and the Crawler is in my plans as well ... but to discover that you're planning to build this too ... well, I'll be watching much more regularly!

 

 

I'm pretty sure that Rich finished. I saw it on another place (oh - I see Manfred has linked it above) and it was quite fantastic. And huge.

Rich had mentioned that he didn't have a lot of space to display it and I dropped a line to NASA's museum (but without response, sadly). That build was a lesson in awe-inspiring persistence almost to the level of Manfred's. He cast individual track shoes and pinned them together so they articulated. If I wasn't broke I'd have bought him a 1:72 Apollo stack to give some context to the crawler. 😁 But I suppose it would have needed an LUT too...

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