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DutyCat

Shuttle Wars: Monogram vs Revell, Part 8

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Part 8 is posted

.

In Part 8, I try to fix the over sized window problem with the Monogram orbiter. Before tackling this, I listened to various ideas to try to determine the best solution. I ended up choosing a technique that did not really work well. I had to come up with something different, as you will see.

Thanks for watching!

Gil Gregg

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Oh boy, ouch! :unsure:

Big problem I've found with most solvent putties is they don't usually have the structure to build up a shape too high without running the risk of them crumbling out of the holes. To do that, two part epoxy putties such as Aves or Milliput would probably be best. The prime reason I like doing the strip styrene method is I know the hardness of the plastic is going to be about the same as the rest of the model where as putties tend to be much softer (epoxy putties are sometimes a little harder). Plus, putting the strips straight onto the windows and using a block sander, file or a stiff sanding stick helps to make sure the sanding will produce a square shape and you are less likely to have a problem with it maybe getting concave in shape (i.e. sunk in in the center of the dividers) as opposed to square with the putties.

Now your solution looks like it will probably work. Vaccuforming the Revell windows is an interesting idea. Of course we don't all have access to vaccuforming equipment, but I can't wait for the results. Keep on swinging!

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Oh boy, ouch! :unsure:

Big problem I've found with most solvent putties is they don't usually have the structure to build up a shape too high without running the risk of them crumbling out of the holes. To do that, two part epoxy putties such as Aves or Milliput would probably be best. The prime reason I like doing the strip styrene method is I know the hardness of the plastic is going to be about the same as the rest of the model where as putties tend to be much softer (epoxy putties are sometimes a little harder). Plus, putting the strips straight onto the windows and using a block sander, file or a stiff sanding stick helps to make sure the sanding will produce a square shape and you are less likely to have a problem with it maybe getting concave in shape (i.e. sunk in in the center of the dividers) as opposed to square with the putties.

Now your solution looks like it will probably work. Vaccuforming the Revell windows is an interesting idea. Of course we don't all have access to vaccuforming equipment, but I can't wait for the results. Keep on swinging!

Live and learn. Each kit presents its own unique challenges. The "masking tape" method sounded reasonable and was suggested by my buddy Tracy Mann. He is Vidar 710 on our board here. I think you know him as he is somewhat of a notable in the Star Trek modeling world. We flew S-3 Vikings together in the Navy.

Anyway, another idea I thought of to fix the windows is to use sheet styrene, cut out and remove the window shapes from the sheet, then laminate the sheet styrene pieces over the existing Monogram windows, in essence building up the thickness of the piece at the same time you are dealing with the shape and size of the windows. Then, all you have to so is putty and clean up the frames and the outer seam.

Too late to try that on this build, though.

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I know Tracy quite well as we've had friendly exchanges back and fourth on other things (including his... bail out, shall we say). We were both going to Private Pilots School at the same time and each flew planes to Wonderfest one year. Now if only ONE of these times when we get to Wonderfest and are able to chat for more than 30 seconds to two minutes on ONE day, that would be cool as Tracy is a great guy to hang with (big show, lots of faces, hard to meet all the people you want to).

The putty idea was at least worth a try in any event, but considering how I hate normal putty I just went with another method. I'm sure this will look good, however it ends. All projects worth doing have some form of struggle to them. For some of us, if model building (as opposed to kit assembling) were easy, I don't entirely know if we would be doing it since there needs to be a little challenge in there to make it interesting.

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I just glued the windows on as is and put a paper thin styrene strip over it to make the windows more accurate. http://fc06.deviantart.net/fs70/i/2011/358/d/0/challenger_windows_by_onigojirakaiju-d4k3j3x.jpg

http://fc02.deviantart.net/fs71/i/2012/027/d/b/left_side_of_columbia_model_by_onigojirakaiju-d4nr4so.jpg

This works as the windows put on as is are sunk into their frames. The styrene strip fills this in so they are even like on the real orbiter.

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I know Tracy quite well as we've had friendly exchanges back and fourth on other things (including his... bail out, shall we say). We were both going to Private Pilots School at the same time and each flew planes to Wonderfest one year.

Tracy is flying for American Eagle now. We both interviewed and got job offers from AE the same day. He took it and is still there. I went with Air Wisconsin, got furloughed, then recalled a year and half later. By then, I was established with a pretty good gig in the school system, and decided not to go back. If I were younger, I might have, but even when I started with them in my late 40's I was kind of on the outside edge of it being a viable second career after the Navy. Now I have the opportunity to build up a magnet program Aerospace Academy at my school. But I still get jealous of his flying sometimes, especially if I have had a rough day with the students. At least I never have to travel, and have more time at home to build models. So it all works out, I guess.

I just glued the windows on as is and put a paper thin styrene strip over it to make the windows more accurate.

This works as the windows put on as is are sunk into their frames. The styrene strip fills this in so they are even like on the real orbiter.

Yes, I think a sheet styrene laminate featuring the correct window shapes, placed over the kit glass is the way to go. Next time!

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