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1/48 CF-101 Voodoo 409 Squadron 1967


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Instructions shminstructions! I was going to suggest exactly what Neu did. Unless you really look, there's not a whole lot of the front gear bay visible anyway. Nice recovery bub. You might also wish to remove that vent on the right side by the front gear well. Our Voodoos didn't have them. It's a simple fix. Just fill the depression with putty and sand smooth.

What's modeling without a little adversity? It's going to turn out fine, ALF. I have no doubts.

Keep it up.

Mike

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Good fix on the nose gear! Or to put it another way that might help appease those going through hockey withdrawl - nice save!

As far as the vent on the port side of the nose gear well, only '067 (the Electric Jet) had the scoop provided in the kit. Both of the original batches of Voodoo's had a flush NACA style intake as shown below.

CF-101_Port_misc_vent_intake.jpg

The depression that allows for placement of the kit scoop part is very close to the desired final shape, if you're really into detailing it could be reshaped with some strip and/or putty.

Cheers,

Sean

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Looking good so far.

Might be too late but I have spare nose gear parts left over from my Voodoo since I did a wheels up version. If you need anything let me know.

Denis

Denis

Thanks for the offer - I really appreciate it - but I think I'll be OK with the parts I have.

Nice recovery, ALF! Seems like I have had to pull of one of those on every build I have done to date. :bandhead2:

Looking forward to more progress.

Cheers,

Don

Don

Yup, me too. I don't know what it is. Maybe the fact I am dividing my attention between course preparation, exam marking, parenting, and other pursuits. Modeling is not getting the time it deserves! :P

Instructions shminstructions! I was going to suggest exactly what Neu did. Unless you really look, there's not a whole lot of the front gear bay visible anyway. Nice recovery bub. You might also wish to remove that vent on the right side by the front gear well. Our Voodoos didn't have them. It's a simple fix. Just fill the depression with putty and sand smooth.

What's modeling without a little adversity? It's going to turn out fine, ALF. I have no doubts.

Keep it up.

Mike

Mike

Thanks for your support, buddy. And about that vent - I had a vague sentiment that it didn't belong when I glued it in place - but between the mental note to check and the act of glueing in place, too many things transpired, and it ended up attached. With your comment (and Sean's great reference pic), I will be able to recover again.

ALF

Good fix on the nose gear! Or to put it another way that might help appease those going through hockey withdrawl - nice save!

As far as the vent on the port side of the nose gear well, only '067 (the Electric Jet) had the scoop provided in the kit. Both of the original batches of Voodoo's had a flush NACA style intake as shown below.

The depression that allows for placement of the kit scoop part is very close to the desired final shape, if you're really into detailing it could be reshaped with some strip and/or putty.

Cheers,

Sean

I really appreciate your ferreting out the ref pic, and above all the fact that you have a similar approach to mine: if it matters, do the detailing, if you don't really get torqued by it, just make it look like an airplane.

I will not proceed with the fixes and hints provided by you all - and then will spray some primer and start the Alclad. In parallel, I am working on the canopies (yellow linings, then masking, in prep for primer).

I plan to close up the canopy on this one.

ALF

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Good fix on the nose gear! Or to put it another way that might help appease those going through hockey withdrawl - nice save!

As far as the vent on the port side of the nose gear well, only '067 (the Electric Jet) had the scoop provided in the kit. Both of the original batches of Voodoo's had a flush NACA style intake as shown below.

{snip}

The depression that allows for placement of the kit scoop part is very close to the desired final shape, if you're really into detailing it could be reshaped with some strip and/or putty.

Cheers,

Sean

Hi Sean.

That's not quite correct. Only the second batch voodoo's had the NACA style refrideration scoop. The first batch had the style provided by the kit. If Alf is doing a 1967 RCAF+3 version, he'll need the scoop.

Not my photo but one I had in my collection showing the scoop on 1st batch airframes.

17463.jpg

Also not my photo but another good reference.

http://www.airteamimages.com/pics/144/144570_big.jpg

thanks

David

Edited by RiderFan
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Hi Sean.

That's not quite correct. Only the second batch voodoo's had the NACA style refrideration scoop. The first batch had the style provided by the kit. If Alf is doing a 1967 RCAF+3 version, he'll need the scoop.

Not my photo but one I had in my collection showing the scoop on 1st batch airframes.

Also not my photo but another good reference.

http://www.airteamimages.com/pics/144/144570_big.jpg

thanks

David

David

Good timing with your excellent intervention! Luckily, things are slowing down on the airframe while I concentrate on finishing the cockpit before closing it up. No pics at the moment, but I have finished masking the canopies, and have painted the yellow around the canopy frames. When your Voodoo sheet comes out, I will buy one and use it for the other example of this kit I have in my stash.

I've glued most of the bits in place inside the cockpits, and am doing the finishing touches on paint inside. Plan to close up the canopy soon, then paint some primer over it all.

ALF

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  • 3 weeks later...

Sorry it's been so long since I updated. Progress has been slow. Midterm exams (creation of exams, marking them, entering marks, dealing with the inevitable discontent...) have taken lots of time out of my schedule.

And the Alclad has been great, but I have also stumbled a bit here and there.

First, the primer. Grey, from a rattle can. Took a long time to paint the yellow inside the canopy (bands around the edge) and to mask the canopy off.

P1150860.jpg

P1150861.jpg

Pretty big ridge underneath, aft of the weapons bay, but this will not show - not fixing it. My models don't win contests!

P1150862.jpg

Saw some gaps here, where I chopped the IR sensor. Fixed with Tamiya putty, then sanded.

P1150864.jpg

Tried some different primer techniques. Sprayed Krylon black everywhere except for a few spots. Curious to see how it will turn out.

P1150869.jpg

A bit of running under the masking tape (used regular style, not Tamiya tape like I did on the canopy area).

Here there is a bit of Tamiya and regular tape, where I will leave the grey undercoat (this part is grey on the aircraft).

P1150870.jpg

After the first coat (Polished aluminum colour) of Alclad, the contrast between grey and black primed areas was absolutely unbelievable.

P1150871.jpg

ALF

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I removed the running black undercoat (which was surprisingly visible inside the lighter panel areas), masked off a few panels on top of the wings and on the tail, and sprayed Matte aluminum.

Before the matte aluminum:

P1150872.jpg

After.

P1160027.jpg

I need to redo some of that yellow. Looks to me like the long-term solution will be to procure some Winter Valley Voodoo decals when they come out, and apply the canopy yellow that will eliminate my biggest bug-bear with this kit.

P1160028.jpg

I used Dark aluminum on the tail exhaust segment, then sprayed some Steel over it, on the outside of the burner cans and underneath and aft. Also added some black, lightly sprayed, that I used on the nose.

P1160029.jpg

P1160030.jpg

P1160031.jpg

ALF

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:bandhead2:

Why the frustration? One word. Photobucket.

It is not cooperating today - what a major PITA.

While we're waiting for pics, and more progress visually, here's where I am:

-Alclad finished

-White inside intakes touched up

-pitot boom painted cnadystripes and silver

-wheels painted and installed

-flaps painted and installed

What's next?

-need to repaint yellow on canopy panes. Not looking forward to that. Might buy Wintervalley decals just for that!

-decalling

Anyone else having Photobucket problems? I'm thinking of switching to another image hosting site. Since beta came out, it's been horrible. I can't even get it to show my pics, can't open a dialogue box to browse to upload, and can't select the original Photobucket version.

ALF

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I'm having the same problems with Photocrap. Whoever designed the newest version should be flogged, hung, drawn and quartered...the latter with a dull knife.

Barney

Well said, Barney.

ALF

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OK - finally got a response to my query from Photobucket. I sent tech support an e-mail on their web form, and someone wrote me back with the fix. Here is what he told me to do (those having troubles with it might try it - worked for me):

******************************************************************

Frank (Photobucket Customer Support Home)

Nov 18 04:21 pm (MST)

Hello there!

I am very sorry for the inconvenience! There was an issue effecting users, we've identified the problem and our engineering team fixed it.

Please clear your cookies and cache, restart your browser and log back in.

Clear your browser's cache and cookies:

http://photobucket.zendesk.com/entries/21118613-clear-your-browser-s-cache-and-cookies

If you experience any of the same issues please let me know so I can notify our engineers.

Thank you for your patience and again, I am terribly sorry for this inconvenience!

--------------------------------------------------------------------

Frank@Photobucket Support

Have you tried the All New Photobucket? What are you waiting for?! Give it a shot and join the fun here: http://bit.ly/QlIcxJ

********************************************************************

The previous progress is here.

P1160032.jpg

I'm not very happy with the yellow bands on the canopy (need retouching), nor with the colours on the burner cans here.

P1160033.jpg

P1160034.jpg

This is the last time I use a mix of black and grey primers under Alclad. The black looks the best, and the shading is easy to do with masking and different Alclad colours. With Krylon primer, the Alclad bonds so well the masking is worry-free - even with regular masking tape, that lifted up my previous attempts at Alclad on other models (poorly primed was the problem).

P1160035.jpg

I've attached the wheels, and hand-painted the interiors of the flaps and wheel wells.

P1160036.jpg

ALF

Edited by ALF18
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She looks great Alf

Thanks Neo!

Ohhhhhhh.....shiny!

Huh? Oh - were you talking to me? Too busy watching the reflected light from the aluminum finish... :woot.gif:

LOL. Exactly what I was thinking. Looking great Alf! :thumbsup:/> :thumbsup:/>

Thanks Big Daddy

I have touched up the yellow around the canopy, and am about to start decalling. David Winter has provided some advice on that, but unfortunately I don't have everything required. Let me explain. I'll be using the Belcher Bits decals, which are mostly OK. What is going to be inaccurate for the era I'm depicting is the lack of white rectangles under the ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE decals on the sides.

If you don't tell anyone, I won't either... and I'm sure my Dad would have understood.

ALF

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While we're waiting for someone (me) to get cranking on the decals and progress pics, we will pause for a short message from the inspiration for this GB - living history.

I recall going to watch the Voodoos taking off and landing at Comox. Dad would drive us out to the end of the runway in our brand new 1964 VW Beetle, red, with a sunroof. I'd stand (at age 5) on the two front seats, looking out the top, as they roared over our heads. Noise, smoke, and a general scary feeling of Armageddon as they rushed by, gear cycling up, and disappeared into the overcast (typical for the Northwest Pacific Coast, of course).

On family days, we would get to sit in these huge beasts. I remember looking down at the tarmac from the ladder, and hoping I wouldn't fall. It was quite a long way down. I still remember the smell of leather, canvas, and sweat, mixed with jet fuel and other unidentifiable odours.

Over the years I heard many stories about his time on the Voodoo. The time one of his friends got shot in the leg for crossing a red line at a USAF base, after turning around on his bicycle past the guard entry point to go and get something he'd forgotten in the cockpit. The time somebody pitched up and the crew had to bail out. Other things I saw, like his pilot walking into a glass patio door while moving furniture (they were usually crewed with the same Pilot/Nav for quite a while). After the pilot stopped swearing and rubbing his nose, it was clear he was all right. My Dad ribbed him many times about how he wasn't sure he would still trust him with his life after doing something like that... All the world that was NORAD with the CF-101 Voodoo.

NORAD was quite a mystery to me, until I finally became NORAD-qualified myself on the CF-18 many years later. Strangely enough, many of the things we still used in the 90s dated from the CF-100 Clunk and CF-101 Voodoo eras. Quite spooky.

Despite all the influence in my early years from the Voodoo, it was still a distant memory to me, and a bit of a mysterious, loud, ostentatious jet. The Air Defence world, centred around Bagotville (410 training squadron, 425 operational), Chatham New Brunswick (416 squadron), and Comox (409 squadron), was its own universe.

In 1984, 20 years after we moved to Comox where Dad flew in Voodoos, I got my chance to fly in one of these beasts. I was instructing on the Tutor in Moose Jaw, and was nearing the end of my stint at the Jaw. I wanted to transfer to fighters, and the School had a program where we could take a Tutor to an operational base and fly with a fighter unit for a week. Voodoos were being phased out, so that was out of the question, but the CF-5 Freedom Fighter was still being operated by 433 Squadron in Bagotville, and by 434 Squadron in Chatham. So off I went to Bagotville with another Tutor instructor. I spent the week flying multiple back-seat trips in the F-5 with 433 Squadron, getting a taste of what that was like. At the far end of the flight line, the big grey Voodoos occasionally rumbled to life and roared into the sky on afterburners, making a huge boom sound when the burners kicked in, then trailing black smoke after the burners were deselected and the engines went into Military power.

I wandered over to 425, and talked with a guy I knew from military college. Hank offered to take me for a ride, as long as his Navigator was OK with it. I quickly made a deal with the Navigator to take him for a Tutor ride, and he let me take his back seat. Turned out to be a bad deal for the Nav - later that afternoon, we taxied out together in the Tutor, but an Inverter failed, cancelling the flight. Oops... I had already had what I wanted, though - a ride in the Voodoo!

The first bizarre thing was the concept that there was no control stick in the back - just the controls for the radar antenna. It was a cold winter day, about -30 Celsius or so. Jet engines perform very well in extreme cold. The thick, dense air boosts engine thrust at lower altitudes. When it got very cold, it was unnecessary to use afterburners in a Voodoo for takeoff on the 10,000' long runway. In fact, colder than a certain temperature, it was not permitted to use AB at all (protecting the structure, perhaps the engine mounts?). Hank told me that I was lucky today. It was just warm enough to be able to use AB for takeoff and the climb-out.

Being used to the ejection seat in the Tutor, it was not too bad strapping in. The seat was similar in many ways to the Tutor seat, as was the parachute. Despite the fact I was now 25 years old, it still looked like a long way to the ground from the high cockpit. When the canopy came down, I realized the back seater didn't see much out the front, or the back. Friends who have flown in the F-4 Phantom tell me it's even worse than the Voodoo, though.

We taxied out on the partly snowy taxiways, leading a two-ship formation. We lined up on half the runway, and number two tucked into position beside and behind us. We rolled first, with him following behind - the plan was for him to be in radar trail. Hank asked if I was ready, then ran up the throttles to partial power. Right away I knew this was to be different from an F-5 or Tutor. The whole aircraft shook as the brakes strained to hold it back on partial power, and the roar was quite audible from the cockpit. After a quick check of engine instruments, Hank released the brakes and the aircraft started to roll, a bit faster than I was used to. Then the throttles went quickly to full military, and I sank back into the seat. After a brief pause, they went outboard and forward into the Afterburner detent. There was a moment where nothing happened, then I was slammed back into the seat as the thrust came on - WHAM!

In no time, the rumbling of the wheels stopped as the nose rose way up and we got airborne. The gear cycled up, and I watched the True Airspeed (TAS) readout in the back increase through 250 to over 400 knots, as we pointed the nose even higher. We climbed up into the clouds at about 10,000 feet, still in AB, and within a minute or so we were clear on cloud on top, rolling inverted to pull the nose down and level off at 35,000 feet. The distance readout from the base was still in the teens as we topped out, less than 2 minutes after takeoff. Very impressive!

The rest of the trip was mostly above the clouds, doing intercepts with our wingman, which were actually quite benign and not too exciting. We came back about an hour later, and did individual approaches to break through the clouds. Down at traffic pattern altitude, the weather was good, so we went toward "Initial", a point 3 miles final before the runway. Hank made a special request to Tower, and we were cleared to do a 270 degree turn at Initial to line up with the runway. He said "watch the TAS" just before we rolled into the turn. From 300 knots TAS, he selected full AB, then wrapped up into a tight turn to the right, building from 2G to 4G as we sped up. I was crushed into the seat, and saw the TAS increasing throughout the turn until we came out after 270 degrees at 500 knots TAS. That was how impressive the Voodoo was in the cold air.

The landing was soft, and the drag chute slowed us down with a jerk, just like in the CF-5. The difference was we dragged the chute with us well clear of the runway - the CF-5 with a drag chute attached was not easy to taxi, but the Voodoo seemed to want to go all day with it billowing behind us.

It was over too fast, but I was happy to have lived what my father did 20 years before. He told me that after 6 months of being an AI (Air Intercept) Navigator the job became quite routine. I can understand why, given the low complexity of what they could do in the Voodoo. It still beats working in an office, though!

More progress coming soon.

ALF

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Hi ALF.

Great story. People reading that are living vicariously through you. We can imagine ourselves in the back seat, experiencing the flight as you did. At least I can anyway. I have very vague memories of mom and dad taking me and my brother and sister out near Uplands when I was 4 - 6 and watching the Voodoos take off along with the Air Canada Viscounts and Vanguards. Good memories...

I like the contrast of the different panels. Your efforts turned out well. As for the exhaust and burner cans, it would be a bit of a PITA but if you can mask the area and shoot some Model Master Metalizer or Alclad II Burnt Metal, you'll like the results.

I also see ALF Sr. looking on in approval.

Nice work buddy.

Mike

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A great read ALF! During the '60s I was a GCA controller at Zweibrucken, Germany and one day ran into the base maintenance test pilot who I had known at Namao, CEPE. He asked if I had an HAI and of course I had. He also asked if I would like to fly in the CF-104D..You betcha!

About a week later I was doing my semi-annual qualification flight test and Testor 99 was my victim. At 3 miles from t/d I broke transmission for gear and lanyard check.."Gear in the green..lanyard connected..and I have a Two holer in 45 minutes". Great.. the WO2 sent me packing and strapped into the wailing beast and for the next hour had the thrill of a lifetime.

On later trips I got to fly the beast right to touch down with Bob talking me through it. All of your recollections of flying in the VooDoo were experienced by myself. Later when commissioned from the ranks and controlling at Moose Jaw, I was able to do a lot of flying with the guys in Standards Flight and enjoyed the Tutor immensely.

Per Ardua Ad Astra

Barney

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Hi ALF.

Great story. People reading that are living vicariously through you. We can imagine ourselves in the back seat, experiencing the flight as you did. At least I can anyway. I have very vague memories of mom and dad taking me and my brother and sister out near Uplands when I was 4 - 6 and watching the Voodoos take off along with the Air Canada Viscounts and Vanguards. Good memories...

I like the contrast of the different panels. Your efforts turned out well. As for the exhaust and burner cans, it would be a bit of a PITA but if you can mask the area and shoot some Model Master Metalizer or Alclad II Burnt Metal, you'll like the results.

I also see ALF Sr. looking on in approval.

Nice work buddy.

Mike

:wub:

Thanks Mike! I am nearing completion of the decals, and will wait until I have them done to post pics. I've fixed up the rear portions of the engines a bit. Brush-painted some black, as well as some Tamiya XF-56 Metallic Grey on the nozzle portions. I think it looks better.

And yup, dear old Dad is definitely happy with it. Although I can still hear him critiquing some of the build, like he did with my shoes when I was in Air Cadets. I was all proud of the shiny toe caps, and he would point out (rightly) that while the toes were definitely very shiny, the fact that I hadn't bothered to apply polish to the seams around the sides of the soles kind of negated the effect. Argh. Of course, I never agreed with him, and insisted that he didn't know what he was talking about. He just smiled wisely, and told me to "stop searching for the fly crap in the pepper", and look at the big picture.

In this case, I try to appreciate the overall model, fixing what I can (like the engine exterior colour), and putting it all in context. Just like he taught me to do.

ALF

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A great read ALF! During the '60s I was a GCA controller at Zweibrucken, Germany and one day ran into the base maintenance test pilot who I had known at Namao, CEPE. He asked if I had an HAI and of course I had. He also asked if I would like to fly in the CF-104D..You betcha!

About a week later I was doing my semi-annual qualification flight test and Testor 99 was my victim. At 3 miles from t/d I broke transmission for gear and lanyard check.."Gear in the green..lanyard connected..and I have a Two holer in 45 minutes". Great.. the WO2 sent me packing and strapped into the wailing beast and for the next hour had the thrill of a lifetime.

On later trips I got to fly the beast right to touch down with Bob talking me through it. All of your recollections of flying in the VooDoo were experienced by myself. Later when commissioned from the ranks and controlling at Moose Jaw, I was able to do a lot of flying with the guys in Standards Flight and enjoyed the Tutor immensely.

Per Ardua Ad Astra

Barney

Barney

Thanks for the comments. For those who have experienced flight in a high-performance military jet, we know it's literally a thrill of a lifetime. Over-used of late as a cliché, but true in this case.

I too got to see life on the Controller side of the fence in Moose Jaw. I remember going up to the Tower during the student solo portion of night flying (later, after I finished up my instructional flight and sent my student on his own for his second trip of the night). The controller, a friend of mine, let me control the Outer runway pattern. She only had to coach me a few times, and it was kind of fun. I've always liked to put myself in other peoples' shoes to understand them better when we work together - this was a good example of that.

What I liked about taking technicians for rides in the Hornet years later was how they suddenly realized that maybe pilots were not quite so clueless as they might think. When they saw the complexity of the job, and how all the little bits of knowledge and skill fit together to fly a safe mission, they suddenly stopped rolling their eyes the next time a pilot failed to remember that the F-404 T-5 probe was cooled by engine fuel flow, and not by the nozzle fluid... (BTW, I made that last part up - just an example of how every person who is technically adept has their own field of expertise).

ALF

Edited by ALF18
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Excellent read Alf. Makes me jealous.

Only thing my dad flew when he was in was a desk. The world of a finance officer is not quite as neat as pilot.

One thing about having a father that started as a Nav before becoming a Pilot is that I was taught from a young age that the Air Force depended on all their members - not just the "poofs deluxes" (derogatory term comparing pilots to high-priced ladies of the night).

And that, Phantom, is why you are assuredly proud of your father's contribution to the military. On some level, it humanized the military for you - and that's why there is such a high percentage of military brats that sign up themselves.

I was just born into lucky circumstances where I saw every day that imperfect human beings can do really cool things. It provided me with the assurance that I could do it too - even though Dad was very low-key and sobering when I announced in my mid-teens that I was applying to become a military pilot. He hit me with the numbers, and discouraged me with the effort at each stage of training. His way of preparing me to work hard, and to accept the disappointment if I didn't reach my goal.

Numbers he told me (valid in the mid 70s):

3,500 applicants each year to be a pilot

1,700 passed medical and basic aptitude standards

After Aircrew Selection (1 week of a battery of tests at Downsview, Toronto) - 450 "fit for pilot training"

After Basic Officer Training Course (3 months of leadership, similar to Junior Leader's course for Corporals) - 320

At Portage la Prairie (Primary Flying Training on the Musketeer), first class: "look at the guy on your left, and the one on the right. 3 months from now, one of them will not be here any more (50% failure rate). Down to 160 candidates

Moose Jaw, Tutor, Wings training. 20% failure rate. About 125 to 130 graduated each year with Wings.

And you want to go fighters? Well, only 30 per year are accepted into fighters.

So from 3,500, only 1% got into fighter aviation each year. Sobering numbers. He told me to get a degree, which was excellent advice. He also told me "you're going to need it when you fail out of flying training." Not if, when. I think he was happier than I was when he pinned my wings on my chest in Moose Jaw 7 years later.

At first, I believed that pilots were the only cool ones. Since then, I've been around the block more than once, and realized that everyone who serves in the military is doing their best, and their contributions are necessary to keep the whole machine running. Now that I've spent almost as many years working in civilian industry, and now teaching, I think back fondly to the honesty, integrity, and dedication of our military (and our allies). If companies had that kind of ethos, this would be a better world.

Thanks for reading!

ALF

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One thing about having a father that started as a Nav before becoming a Pilot is that I was taught from a young age that the Air Force depended on all their members - not just the "poofs deluxes" (derogatory term comparing pilots to high-priced ladies of the night).

And that, Phantom, is why you are assuredly proud of your father's contribution to the military. On some level, it humanized the military for you - and that's why there is such a high percentage of military brats that sign up themselves.

Actually I joined because I was all ready doing his clerks job. She was an idiot (that IS putting it nicely) and even with multiple retrainings she never grasped the job. So he had her do other things around the office while his kid (a cadet at the time) helped. He rightly figured I might as well get paid for what I was doing and I signed the dotted line the day before my 17th birthday. Went infantry as I knew I did NOT want to be a paper pusher then transfered to medical.

" Not if, when. I think he was happier than I was when he pinned my wings on my chest in Moose Jaw 7 years later.

I think he was pretty happy when he pinned my CD on me.

DSC_0070-1.jpg

At first, I believed that pilots were the only cool ones. Since then, I've been around the block more than once, and realized that everyone who serves in the military is doing their best, and their contributions are necessary to keep the whole machine running. Now that I've spent almost as many years working in civilian industry, and now teaching, I think back fondly to the honesty, integrity, and dedication of our military (and our allies). If companies had that kind of ethos, this would be a better world.

Ya know, this is very true if not for the finance side we would have a bunch of right annoyed troops.

ALF

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