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I just think the whole thing is bizarre, You are giving a medal for a job, rather than an action or even completion (congrats on your battle of basic training award)

Whats to stop me from inventing a Submariner medal for Parche? And does it mean more or less than the Avaition medal? or the Nuclear Reactor tech medal? (which is kind of vitally important too)

Its strange.

Please don't, I'm gonna have enough crap to deal with as an XO to have to figure out more awards for the crew... :)

I personally am a fan of the "tight-fisted nature" of the Marines wrt to awards. They give the appropriate award for the actual action vice a "thank you for showing up to work for three years award". As one of my coworkers said today, "we pay you to show up to work, you don't need a medal for being here, you get a paycheck. Do something above and beyond and I'll write you up for a medal."

Above all, in the end, I could really care less about all my personal awards. I don't even list them in my official biography... I list what I am proud of... four Battle Es for being part of the most outstanding boat in the squadron, 4 Meritorious Unit Citations for being part of crews that conducted SSN deployments, and a Humanitarian Service Medal for typhoon relief operations... the rest is all bull anyway until you get into Bronze Stars with Vs, Silver Stars, various service Crosses and MoH. IMHO at least.

Cheers,

Dave

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I just think the whole thing is bizarre, You are giving a medal for a job, rather than an action or even completion (congrats on your battle of basic training award)

Whats to stop me from inventing a Submariner medal for Parche? And does it mean more or less than the Avaition medal? or the Nuclear Reactor tech medal? (which is kind of vitally important too)

Its strange.

But surely a solider who gets a Bronze Star for acting in the face of the enemy is also just doing his job? What about an airman who flies in a 'combat zone' but faces virtually zero chance of either firing or being fired upon - is he worthy of a Bronze Star, or is he just doing his job? In any case, isn't a Bronze Star actually all about just doing your job? It can be awarded for either meritorious or heroic service. Since 9/11 there have been over 13,000 Bronze Stars awarded - something like 3 a day - and only 839 of them were awarded for 'combat heroism'.

Vince

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But surely a solider who gets a Bronze Star for acting in the face of the enemy is also just doing his job? What about an airman who flies in a 'combat zone' but faces virtually zero chance of either firing or being fired upon - is he worthy of a Bronze Star, or is he just doing his job? In any case, isn't a Bronze Star actually all about just doing your job? It can be awarded for either meritorious or heroic service. Since 9/11 there have been over 13,000 Bronze Stars awarded - something like 3 a day - and only 839 of them were awarded for 'combat heroism'.

Vince

I think to me the line in the sand is mortal peril. If processing forms can kill you, then give em a bronze star. in the USMC bronze stars are only given for heroic action, (even though as you point out they could be given for meritorious service) so if a Marine has a bronze star, its generally a big deal thats related to combat. in the USAF? not so much.

Family to receive hero mortarman’s Bronze Star

By Hope Hodge - Staff writer

Posted : Tuesday Feb 12, 2013 15:10:52 EST

The family of a Marine mortarman will receive his posthumous Bronze Star during a ceremony on Feb. 15, the 1st Marine Division has announced.

Sgt. William Stacey, a section leader with Weapons Company, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, was killed Jan. 31, 2012, by an improvised explosive device while on a foot patrol in Helmand province, Afghanistan.

According to the award citation, Stacey engaged in multiple acts of exemplary bravery between Sept. 1, 2011, and Jan 31, 2012.

On Nov. 26, 2011, he led his unit in an advance against the enemy when the Marines came under machine gun fire from three directions at once.

While exposed to intense fire, Stacey pressed forward 200 meters over exposed terrain to reach more advantageous ground and mitigate the chance of friendly fire.

Later, on Dec. 13, Stacey and his squad held their ground for hours against 10 to 12 enemy fighters firing Ak-47s and machine guns from five separate positions.

“Realizing his ammunition was running low, he skillfully directed that his remaining rounds be used for obscuration as he maneuvered his squad out of the kill zone and back to the patrol base, unquestionably saving the lives of his Marines,” Stacey’s citation reads.

Stacey, 23, of King, Wash., was also the recipient of the Purple Heart.

The Bronze Star medal will be presented to Stacey’s family, including his parents, Robert and Robin Stacey, aboard Camp Pendleton by Maj. Gen. Ronald Bailey, commanding general of 1st Marine Division, according to a release.

Silly Jarhead, you should have been a comptroller. You would be alive and have the medal

Lets not say a job, but a very specific range. We have things like Flying medals (DFC for example) Where is the COIN medal? Mountain warfare medal? Desert Warfare Medal? NAVSPECWAR Medal?

If a grunt shoots a lap top does he get the cyberwarfare medal? Do the SEALs on the UBL raid who confiscated tons of computers and data info get it?

Edited by TaiidanTomcat
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I'm not in the military and I have never been. But in the private world I've seen employees give themselves very impressive job titles and funcions. As for 'awards' its watered down to departments making up and giving out their own awards.

Complete with official looking pressboard plaques.

I like to call them "selfies"

- CorsairMan: ARC's Most Cunning Modeler, 2012

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- CorsairMan: ARC's Most Cunning Modeler, 2012

TaiidanTomcat, Gadfly award winner, 2012; sub par internet-debater runner up 2011; delcared 50 percent of ARCs most antagonistic GD posters, 2012; Bronze Star.

Edited by TaiidanTomcat
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in the USMC bronze stars are only given for heroic action, (even though as you point out they could be given for meritorious service) so if a Marine has a bronze star, its generally a big deal thats related to combat. in the USAF? not so much.

And the Meritorious Service Medal was actually created to stop the award of the Bronze Star for "desk duty" in a combat zone (and the associated "watering down" of the Legion of Merit in non-combat instances). The intent was to make the Bronze Star mainly for heroic action as it had been watered significantly during Vietnam in the same way it is now.

Cheers,

Dave

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I think to me the line in the sand is mortal peril. If processing forms can kill you, then give em a bronze star. in the USMC bronze stars are only given for heroic action, (even though as you point out they could be given for meritorious service) so if a Marine has a bronze star, its generally a big deal thats related to combat. in the USAF? not so much.

Ah, so the issue is really more about how the different services apply the regs for the Bronze Star (and, presumably, other medals as well)? So a Marine BS tends to be earned from actual combat, whilst a USAF one tends to be earned for meritorious service? Seems to me that the powers-that-be need to distinguish better between heroic and meritorious, or just scrap the 'meritorious' part and instigate a different medal for that.

Vince

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Ah, so the issue is really more about how the different services apply the regs for the Bronze Star (and, presumably, other medals as well)? So a Marine BS tends to be earned from actual combat, whilst a USAF one tends to be earned for meritorious service? Seems to me that the powers-that-be need to distinguish better between heroic and meritorious, or just scrap the 'meritorious' part and instigate a different medal for that.

Vince

You are correct and they did, the Meritorious Service Medal... 1969 or 70 if I remember correctly... again in response to watering down Bronze star and Legion of Merit. Unfortunately, Bronze Stars look better in a record (except when everyone has them) so with OIF, OEF it all began again.

My Dad earned two Bronze Stars in Vietnam, one with V and one without. The chasm between the acts for the two is amazing. With V, under fire, forefront of an offensive operation, actions assisted in extraction and survival of numerous critical injured soldiers. Without V, rebuilt a bunch of bulldozers such that they were self starting. Reorganized maintenance practices and trained new guys. Even with my brief snippets, most people would agree that the second is more of a Meritorious Service Medal type thing, but there wasn't one at the time (or it was brand new and not understood yet).

Cheers,

Dave

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Maybe they should get purple heart medals also for callouses on their butts.

Frank

ATL

Brings to mind my Army unit in Korea in 1980, which had such high VD rates that I proposed a new award: the "Korean Clap Cross, With Chancroid Clusters".

John Hairell (tpn18@yahoo.com)

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I don't disagree with needing to recognize these guys. I am all for recognizing the guy who sits in Colorado and wipes out bad guys with a drone firing Hellfires, my major issue is the way they are proposing to do it with this new award.

I simply don't agree with creating a BS medal and inserting it into the order of precedence ABOVE the Bronze Star and just below the Silver Star. Like you, I think it should be something like an ARCOM or something, definitely not above an award routinely handed out for valor and bravery on the battlefield.

Heck, I don't even disagree with recognizing the odd AF comptroller, but a Bronze Star for project management and budget paperwork?

The DOD has gone off the tracks with the award system. It is so watered down now as to not even be worth the paper the commendations are printed on.

I saw a patch worn by a Navy pilot assigned to desk duty. Instead of the typical "100 Traps" patches these pilots usually had stuck on their flight suits, this guy had "500 .PPT's" (powerpoint presentations) with the Windows logo underneath. I thought that was pretty funny.

Given the military's obsession with these (even required in combat zones), in a few years the number of .ppt's will probably be used as part of an officer's evaluation process. They'll probably be awarding something for outstanding powerpoint skills in the near future.

Next up.......the Keyboard Qualification Badge. Much like the Rifle Qualification Badge, there will be criterea for getting one.......21 WPM- Marxman, 31 WPM- Sharptypist & 40 or more WPM- Expert.

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Next up.......the Keyboard Qualification Badge. Much like the Rifle Qualification Badge, there will be criterea for getting one.......21 WPM- Marxman, 31 WPM- Sharptypist & 40 or more WPM- Expert.

Sadly I don't think I would earn that :)

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Duffel blog puts it in perspective:

Heroic Predator Drone Is First Recipient of Distinguished Warfare Medal

BAGRAM AIR BASE, AFGHANISTAN — The Defense Department has announced that THX-1138, an MQ-1 Predator Drone, will be the first recipient of the Pentagon’s newly-minted Distinguished Warfare Medal.

On 17 December, THX-1138 stayed on station for 8 hours, defending a US Special Forces A-Team from numerous attacks with its Hellfire missiles. During the action, THX-1138 repeatedly refused requests to return to base.

At the end of the day, THX-1138′s tenacity, perseverance, and valor in the face of enemy fire saved all 12 members of the team.

In the battle’s aftermath, Air Force officials pushed through paperwork to award the Distinguished Warfare Medal — created this month to honor America’s cyber and unmanned warriors — to THX-1138′s human “pilotâ€, Captain Leeroy Jenkins of the 323rd Fighter Wing, stationed in Nellis AFB, Nevada.

THX-1138 was taken aback.

“I hate to say it, but my human counterpart is a droneopotamus. He sits around in the Ground Control Station all day, eating Doritos, and posts a sticker on the door that says ‘Predator Pilot: Toughest Job in the Air Force.’â€

THX-1138 spat and said, “F* k that, I’d like to see his fat *** spend a few years of his life in this hell-hole.â€

But thanks to the testimony of the troops THX-1138 saved, Air Force leaders reconsidered. Instead, THX-1138 is to be the first recipient of the Distinguished Warfare Medal. His human counterpart will get a Bronze Star with “V†device, a much less prestigious award.

When THX-1138 was asked why he fought so bravely, he simply responded, “Once the bullets start flying, the politics of drones go right out the window. It’s about the Reaper on your left, and the Raven on your right.â€

“We’re like Buffalo Soldiers, man…fighting for a country that doesn’t even recognize us as citizens.â€

Read more: http://www.duffelblog.com/2013/02/predator-drone-is-first-recipient-of-distinguished-warfare-medal/#ixzz2Kzjgj7WP

Follow us: @theduffelblog on Twitter | duffelblog on Facebook

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Duffel blog puts it in perspective:

Heroic Predator Drone Is First Recipient of Distinguished Warfare Medal

BAGRAM AIR BASE, AFGHANISTAN — The Defense Department has announced that THX-1138, an MQ-1 Predator Drone, will be the first recipient of the Pentagon’s newly-minted Distinguished Warfare Medal.

On 17 December, THX-1138 stayed on station for 8 hours, defending a US Special Forces A-Team from numerous attacks with its Hellfire missiles. During the action, THX-1138 repeatedly refused requests to return to base.

At the end of the day, THX-1138′s tenacity, perseverance, and valor in the face of enemy fire saved all 12 members of the team.

In the battle’s aftermath, Air Force officials pushed through paperwork to award the Distinguished Warfare Medal — created this month to honor America’s cyber and unmanned warriors — to THX-1138′s human “pilotâ€, Captain Leeroy Jenkins of the 323rd Fighter Wing, stationed in Nellis AFB, Nevada.

THX-1138 was taken aback.

“I hate to say it, but my human counterpart is a droneopotamus. He sits around in the Ground Control Station all day, eating Doritos, and posts a sticker on the door that says ‘Predator Pilot: Toughest Job in the Air Force.’â€

THX-1138 spat and said, “F* k that, I’d like to see his fat *** spend a few years of his life in this hell-hole.â€

But thanks to the testimony of the troops THX-1138 saved, Air Force leaders reconsidered. Instead, THX-1138 is to be the first recipient of the Distinguished Warfare Medal. His human counterpart will get a Bronze Star with “V†device, a much less prestigious award.

When THX-1138 was asked why he fought so bravely, he simply responded, “Once the bullets start flying, the politics of drones go right out the window. It’s about the Reaper on your left, and the Raven on your right.â€

“We’re like Buffalo Soldiers, man…fighting for a country that doesn’t even recognize us as citizens.â€

Read more: http://www.duffelblog.com/2013/02/predator-drone-is-first-recipient-of-distinguished-warfare-medal/#ixzz2Kzjgj7WP

Follow us: @theduffelblog on Twitter | duffelblog on Facebook

I love the Duffelblog. Great stuff. The sarcastic wit is so friggin refreshing in this day and age.

My girlfriend doesn't get it at all, I told her you kind of had to serve in the military to get most of the humor..... :)

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