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A-10 LOADER

1/18th F-14B Tomcat conversion

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Steve

Loadouts look fantastic and will be using this technique on some of my loads for my up coming 32nd scale F4 build

Keep 'em comin

Peter :thumbsup:

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Thanks boys, appreciate the kind words plus, glad you're both still following along.

 

Steve

"TOMCATS FOREVER, BABY...!"

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3 hours ago, my favs are F`s said:

They are Gorgeous! 

 

Thanks man, appreciate that.

 

Steve

"TOMCATS FOREVER, BABY...!"

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Greetings all,

Minor update for tonight but, a major part of the puzzle completed. My replacement decals arrived in the mail this afternoon and I just finished them up. Next up, a semi-gloss coat to seal them in then the weathering can begin. Thanks to all who still follow along.

 

Steve

"TOMCATS FOREVER, BABY...!"

 

IMG_6081_zps7dvkm6wq.jpg

 

IMG_6082_zpsoj8okxmr.jpg

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12 hours ago, JohnS said:

Nice!  Not too long now.

 

John

 

Thanks John, no I'm entering the home stretch now but, still much to do. Weather permitting, it's very hot/humid here on the East Coast, I'll be able to get the next coat of semi-gloss on her and, start the weathering/corrosion control next.

 

Steve

"TOMCATS FOREVER, BABY...!"

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Greetings everyone,

I managed to get the semi-gloss coat on the Tomcat yesterday and I'm currently working on the "corrosion control" touch-ups. This will be my first attempt at trying this so, hopefully I don't screw this up. I am practicing on a test subject to get the feel for it. Hoping to have something worth sharing in the next couple of days. Thanks very much to all those who are still showing an interest in this project.

 

Steve

"TOMCATS FOREVER, BABY...!"

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2 hours ago, A-10 LOADER said:

I managed to get the semi-gloss coat on the Tomcat yesterday

 G'day Steve. Don't recollect, or remember seeing, what paint type you use. Enamels, acrylics or other?  In other words do you have the option of paint (say enamel), acrylic barrier ( say Future), then corrosion control (say enamels) ?

We'll wait as long as it takes. :thumbsup:

 

John.

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Hi John,

Paints used were Tamiya rattle cans, Model Master enamels and, MRP Paint. I won't use any water based paints, don't trust them. Thanks for checking in.

 

Steve

"TOMCATS FOREVER, BABY...!"

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Greeting's everyone,

I've been practicing on my paint mule and trying different things to figure out how to weather/"corrosion control" my Tomcat. My problem is all the "bolt on" parts, fuel tanks, phoenix pallets, pylons, etc. were just painted, gloss coated, decaled, flat coated, wash applied with some pastels and, flat coated again. They've had no "corrosion control" done to them. I'm now trying to do this to the airframe and, I'm terrified of screwing this up and I'm also concerned about things not blending together. I don't want all the parts to look out of place when they are installed onto the jet but, I know how dirty/grimy NAVY jets can get.

I really wanted to prime the jet in black and do the various marbled coats of colors then spray the 3 main colors over top of the marbling but, since the parts weren't done that way I figured I would just do everything the same. Now I'm at the crossroad and don't know what to do !!?? After all this time and effort I really don't want to ruin this. So, I guess I'll throw this out there to the Naval Aviation weathering experts and get your thoughts as to what to do next ?? What would you do at this stage of the game ?? I look forward to your input and appreciate any and all help, thanks.

 

Steve

"TOMCATS FOREVER, BABY...!"

 

Here's my attempt so far. I didn't want to go too far so I can go back and fix this with some top color. I used some Dark Ghost Gray for the "corrosion control".

IMG_6107_zpszpkonpwu.jpg

 

IMG_6108_zps4dngim1o.jpg

 

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12 hours ago, Major Walt said:

I love this big bird! Has anyone ever built one wheels down?

 

Yes Major Walt. There is a guy from Germany currently working on converting the VF-84 F-14A to a low-viz VF-2 F-14D. His will be posed on a section of carrier deck being prepared for a catapult shot. He's done a wonderful job of dropping the slats and flaps, it's really impressive. He posts to a 1/18th scale group on Facebook and has a WIP over on Large Scale Planes but, he hasen't updated that in a while.

 

Steve

"TOMCATS FOREVER, BABY...!"

Edited by A-10 LOADER

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On ‎9‎/‎23‎/‎2018 at 8:11 PM, A-10 LOADER said:

 I'll throw this out there to the Naval Aviation weathering experts

 

Steve, not replying as someone in that category. Perhaps Brian of FT Decals or there was another Brian (M?).  I previously asked what paint system you’re using. I always use enamels and Future as a barrier. Then using enamels on the gloss Future for weathering, stains etc. I can then completely remove if unhappy, tone down or randomise with paint thinners. But not on a matt surface. Looking at the two photos you posted it looks too uniform. But as I said I am no expert.

 

Regards

John

 

 

Something I just found copied and pasted into a Word doc. The link is no longer, but the name is.

 

"A small possible "correction" to your technique. - Darren Roberts on Aug 29, 20052:26 PM

 

 

Your work is truly outstanding and I always enjoy seeing what project you've finished up. If I could humbly make a suggestion on your technique, it may make your finished product even more incredible looking. The one mistake people make in weathering Navy aircraft is making the areas around the panel lines darker. In fact, the rattle cans that are used for corrosion control are all Light Ghost Gray. From a discussion I just had with Brian Marbrey, who had just discussed the subject with a corrosion control crew painting the Tomcat at his museum, airplanes have a 28 day painting cycle, in which maintenance is done and corrosion control painting follows. This painting is done with spray cans of Light Ghost Gray. So, instead of spraying a darker color on the panel lines, one should actually spray Light Ghost Gray. Looking at many a weathered Navy plane, the panel line areas are decidedly lighter. A great technique is to finish off your base colors. Spray a dark gray over the panel line areas, almost like you're preshading. Then, with a fine tip on the airbrush, spray over the dark gray with the Light Ghost Gray, just leaving a hint of dark gray peaking through on the edges. This is the most realistic finish I've seen. Then, you can run a thin wash through the panel lines just to give them some oomph. "

Edited by John Wolstenholme

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Now you're at tbe fun part! 😄

Ok this just subjective to me jow I would proceed..

after you've done the corrosive control around hatches and some panels you start using a darker paint for bettering and repair in spots. These repair marks hand be in all kindsperjantain shapes and sizes. 

next you would want to set a rugged tone by salt chipping or using a template and use a slightly darker base colour.

after that it is time to add some filters in brow is tones where the air craft is handled and walked on..so on top of the back, the wings and around crew steps and boarding ladder. Use a sponge to create texture.

when this is done you can add the usual oil and fuel spills, streaks and worn spots.

try to follow a photo of your object to get the weathering plausible and enhancing the feel of the kit.

 

cheers

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17 hours ago, John Wolstenholme said:

 

Steve, not replying as someone in that category. Perhaps Brian of FT Decals or there was another Brian (M?).  I previously asked what paint system you’re using. I always use enamels and Future as a barrier. Then using enamels on the gloss Future for weathering, stains etc. I can then completely remove if unhappy, tone down or randomise with paint thinners. But not on a matt surface. Looking at the two photos you posted it looks too uniform. But as I said I am no expert.

 

Regards

John

 

 

Something I just found copied and pasted into a Word doc. The link is no longer, but the name is.

 

"A small possible "correction" to your technique. - Darren Roberts on Aug 29, 20052:26 PM

 

 

Your work is truly outstanding and I always enjoy seeing what project you've finished up. If I could humbly make a suggestion on your technique, it may make your finished product even more incredible looking. The one mistake people make in weathering Navy aircraft is making the areas around the panel lines darker. In fact, the rattle cans that are used for corrosion control are all Light Ghost Gray. From a discussion I just had with Brian Marbrey, who had just discussed the subject with a corrosion control crew painting the Tomcat at his museum, airplanes have a 28 day painting cycle, in which maintenance is done and corrosion control painting follows. This painting is done with spray cans of Light Ghost Gray. So, instead of spraying a darker color on the panel lines, one should actually spray Light Ghost Gray. Looking at many a weathered Navy plane, the panel line areas are decidedly lighter. A great technique is to finish off your base colors. Spray a dark gray over the panel line areas, almost like you're preshading. Then, with a fine tip on the airbrush, spray over the dark gray with the Light Ghost Gray, just leaving a hint of dark gray peaking through on the edges. This is the most realistic finish I've seen. Then, you can run a thin wash through the panel lines just to give them some oomph. "

 

Thanks very much for your honesty John, I appreciate that. Brian Marbrey (VFA-103 Guy) and I have been talking regularly, over the phone,  throughout this project and he has given me many good suggestions. In fact, we spoke the day before I posted this question. I don't think it hurts to get other opinions but, I highly regard his.

Thanks also for posting Darre's quote, very good information to have and know.

 

Steve

"TOMCATS FOREVER, BABY...!"

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16 hours ago, Aigore said:

Now you're at tbe fun part! 😄

Ok this just subjective to me jow I would proceed..

after you've done the corrosive control around hatches and some panels you start using a darker paint for bettering and repair in spots. These repair marks hand be in all kindsperjantain shapes and sizes. 

next you would want to set a rugged tone by salt chipping or using a template and use a slightly darker base colour.

after that it is time to add some filters in brow is tones where the air craft is handled and walked on..so on top of the back, the wings and around crew steps and boarding ladder. Use a sponge to create texture.

when this is done you can add the usual oil and fuel spills, streaks and worn spots.

try to follow a photo of your object to get the weathering plausible and enhancing the feel of the kit.

 

cheers

 

Thanks for the input Aigore, I appreciate your thoughts.

 

Steve

"TOMCATS FOREVER, BABY...!"

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Greetings all,
Tonight's update, "Weathering on the Tomcat, take 2."
I decided to "sun bleach" the top color of the Cat which, I think, turned out much better than my first attempt, which was horrible.
Still much more to do but, at least I'm on the right path.
I sincerely appreciate those of you who are still staying interested in my work.

Steve
"TOMCATS FOREVER, BABY...!"

 

IMG_6125_zps8hcjjrhg.jpg

 

IMG_6126_zpsvqhbp98y.jpg

 

IMG_6127_zpswpixthoq.jpg

 

IMG_6128_zpsmvrl383y.jpg

 

IMG_6129_zpsbqahjr4t.jpg

 

IMG_6130_zpsasva9brk.jpg

 

IMG_6131_zpswjapraif.jpg

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Looks really good! :thumbsup:

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9 hours ago, Aigore said:

Looks really good! :thumbsup:

 

Thanks Aigore, I appreciate that. It should look a lot better with a semi-gloss coat over it before the wash.

 

Steve

"TOMCATS FOREVER, BABY...!"

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looks great Steve. are you using Mr.paint paints?

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6 hours ago, John Wolstenholme said:

I don’t know what B.M. thinks, but 10 days later that’s a BIG transformation. It sure looks good to me.  :thumbsup:

 

John.

 

Thanks John, much appreciated. He approves BTW.

1 hour ago, dylan said:

looks great Steve. are you using Mr.paint paints?

 

Thanks Dylan. The only MRP Paint used was for the carbon fiber heat shields by the exhaust nozzles. Everything else is either Tamiya "rattle cans" or Model Master enamels.

 

Steve

"TOMCATS FOREVER, BABY...!"

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