Jump to content
ARC Discussion Forums

Sign in to follow this  
catfan

real auto paint on model cars how do u do it?

Recommended Posts

so i have a idea on useing arcyilc enamel real auto paint to do my model cars i have i have medium reducer to thin it. but has any body hear done this before??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've used DuPont chromabase on an aircraft before and cleared it with 1K clear. Worked ok for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The main issue would be getting a good barrier coat between the plastic and the automotive paint. Some types of automotive paint could damage, craze or melt the styrene. It depends on the paint's carrier medium, and how "hot" it is.

An application of a high-quality primer such as Tamiya Fine Gray or White Surface Primer should allow you to then paint the model with anything you like.

cheers

Old Blind Dog

Edited by Old Blind Dog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have applied auto paint to a 1969 Dodge 440 six pack kit. You defanately need a good primer down before using the paint. I used Duplicolor gray spray primer I picked up at Autozone. The steps I used were as follows

Medium coat of primer then wet sanded it smooth (not showing any bare plastic). Gave it another medium coat of primer along with wet sanding.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ok so what i found for a primer was rustolium light grey auto primer. and i also bought some medium reducer and the paint is a arcrylic enamel paint so with the reducer what kind of paint to reducer to paint mix should i use?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The mix ratio should be on the can.

But if not, I'd say mix it as you would any other paint.

Does your paint require a hardener?

Curt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i will find out tomorrow if i need to add hardener to it. if my plan works i will be so happy using real car paint on my models

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The main issue would be getting a good barrier coat between the plastic and the automotive paint. Some types of automotive paint could damage, craze or melt the styrene. It depends on the paint's carrier medium, and how "hot" it is.

An application of a high-quality primer such as Tamiya Fine Gray or White Surface Primer should allow you to then paint the model with anything you like.

cheers

Old Blind Dog

Ageed. I failed to mention the importance of primer. Auto reducers are usually too hot to go straight over plastic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ageed. I failed to mention the importance of primer. Auto reducers are usually too hot to go straight over plastic.

Following that advise, could I paint my airliner models with aviation grade polyurethane paint?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can't answer that one. I have not been exposed to aviation grade materials since back in the Imron days. I used DuPont Chromabase on my F-104. It's a urethane paint. I primed it with DuPont 1K etching primer, sealed it with 1K trim and jamb clear and final coated it with Testors dull coat. I also painted most of the graphics on it with MM Acryl. No problems. I have painted Imron before and don't recall it being any hotter than chromabase.

Here is the result. There's a thread where I talk about what was used and the process pretty much from start to finish. F-104

104g700002.jpg

Edited by sluggo2u

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's the technique I use;

1) Apply an appropriate automotive primer - two light, almost 'mist', layers followed by a third, heavier coat. Space each coat out by 10 mins.

2) Allow a few days to completely dry.

3) Buff the primer with 1200-grit wet'n'dry paper - don't buff too hard, you'll burn through the paint layers very quickly. The aim is to get the primer as smooth as possible for the subsequent layers of paint.

4) Apply the paint of choice. Again, three layers with the first two being light. On your final coat, try no to get any drips or runs of paint.

5) Leave to dry - at least a week.

6) Once again, buff with old wet'n'dry.

7) Apply one final 'mist' coat.

8) Leave it another week.

9) Apply whatever clearcoat or lacquer is recommended by the manufacturer - three layers once again.

10) Leave to dry for a week.

11) You can then use any modelling wax you like to improve the shine, or indeed T-cut.

12) After all that, give all your hard work a quick wash in warm, slightly soapy water to remove any residue.

13) Job done!

If you're spraying direct from the can, always place it in a container of warm water for a few minutes beforehand, and shake it for a good couple of minutes before applying.

Vince

Edited by vince14

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

vince thanks for the help and every body else on hear thank you for helping. so after i figure out how it works ill post my findings on hear so others can learn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a very simple suggestion.......if you're going to use an automotive paint use an automotive grade primer also......I would suggest an acrylic lacquer primer. The lacquer primer dries fast and provides a good barrier coat for your color coat. Sand before applying any paint for good adhesion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...