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randypandy831

alclad black primer

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Going to spray an F-104 soon and would like on tips on using alclad's gloss black primer. I'm no expert when it comes down to spraying gloss based paints and primers. I've done one test run with the gloss black primer and got this sort of marble effect where it's more glossy in curtain areas then others. Is this because I'm not being consistent when spraying?

1. should I spray a thin layer then do another coat within 24 hours?

2. what should I use to buff the primer or is this possible with their primer?

3. whats the typical curing time?

thanks!

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It just so happens I just did the exact same thing........

CF-104 -12700

I sprayed two light equal coats of the Alcald black with about an hour drying time between coats. It then was a uniform depth.

I did not buff the black. Next day I sprayed Alcald aluminum. Let that dry a day and buffed with some really old SNJ polish powder I had lying around. Now that I am home early today a couple more metal coats of paint are going on. Figure once that is done I will give a coat of Future to seal everything in and keep off the finger prints.

Edited by phantom

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First step is to $h!t can the Alclad Black, then get a can of Tamiya TS-14 Black, spray the desired areas, then apply your alclad, you can do this with in the hour, if you do not need the High Shine polished or chrome Alclad, then you can spray with Tamiya Fine Primer.

Curt

Step16_zps98f30ef7.jpg

011_zps889cb6f7.jpg

Edited by Netz

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haha, knew someone was going to say and ditch the alclad primer. I plan on using polished aluminum

Edited by randypandy831

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I hear so many horror stories, and so many techniques to deal with that stuff, I don't know why anyone would use it.

The Tamiya products I mentioned went on with on problems, no waiting time, no added prep, just spray it on and go...

Curt

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I've heard lots of good things about TS-14. according to alclad's site, they say to apply a gloss coat over the gloss black when dry. this seems to defeat the "gloss" in the black but so be it. i'll try this method and if it doesn't work, then TS-14 it is.

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I'm glad others are having problems with the Black Primer. I'm getting ready to do a T-6 Texan. I like others try to read everything there is about spraying Alclad metallic finishes. Thanks Curt for the advice and will go with Tamiya TS-14 Black. Just curious Curt if you don't need the High Shine or Chrome finish does it matter if you use Tamiya grey or white primer?

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As you see on the B-36 I used the black for the high shine areas, but the grey primer is fine for the other shades, the reason for the black is the high shine colors need it to reflect the color back out, if you apply it over the grey it wouldn't be as shiny.

Here is a fellow Club members Rod, the hubcaps,Radiator and valve covers, are Alclad Chrome over the Tamiya Black.

Curt

100_7965-1.jpg

100_7964.jpg

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i use Krylon gloss black for my alclad base

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I'm glad others are having problems with the Black Primer. I'm getting ready to do a T-6 Texan. I like others try to read everything there is about spraying Alclad metallic finishes. Thanks Curt for the advice and will go with Tamiya TS-14 Black. Just curious Curt if you don't need the High Shine or Chrome finish does it matter if you use Tamiya grey or white primer?

I would recommend gray primer under regular aluminum.

I've heard good things about Krylon to.

Edited by randypandy831

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I'd stick with the Tamiya products, they are made for models and not your Bar-B-Q.

If you've never used it you will be amazed, they are worth the money, and you wont risk ruining your model.

Curt

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Guess I was lucky. The Alclad seems to have worked fine on my kit.

DSC_0282-4.jpg

DSC_0283-4.jpg

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I'd stick with the Tamiya products, they are made for models and not your Bar-B-Q.

If you've never used it you will be amazed, they are worth the money, and you wont risk ruining your model.

Curt

Krylon Gloss black lacquer is actually made for plastic and not BBQ's. It also works great.

Krylon1.jpg

Example

Tail.jpg

Edited by chuck540z3

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You show-off chuck - but that natural metal finish is absolutely stunning.

Thanks. Yeah, sorry, I do love to show off sometimes, but I was also trying to point out that "BBQ Paint" can be a real good base coat for Alclad!

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I think my bottle may have just gone bad. I just ended up spraying tamiya primer,buffing it smooth,and spraying alclad clear over it. it gave the polished aluminum a dull high shine then I over lapped it with white aluminum. I'm happy with the results.

Edited by randypandy831

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I think my bottle may have just gone bad. I just ended up spraying tamiya primer,buffing it smooth,and spraying alclad clear over it. it gave the polished aluminum a dull high shine then I over lapped it with white aluminum. I'm happy with the results.

No, most people's are bad, Its pretty common problem. I had two that had the same issues, one which kinda ruined a High Planes Canberra. I've heard that they may have reformulated it but, well....

The best value for money by a long shot is the Gunze... Mr Finishing primer. Add a bit of glossing agent (or Mr Leveling Thinner) and its superior to anything else on the market today. Its cheap (usually less than 10 dollars a bottle), and lasts A LONG time. This was my first time using it... though without a gloss or levelling thinner.

8H13_zps6c735f6b.jpg

Edited by -Neu-

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A gloss sky blue base coat I have found puts out a very nice bright tone and by varying your base colors, you can get by with just the aluminum shade of alclad instead of having a range of them. It can get rather expensive to collect.

Alclad II printed instruction sheet suggested this method. Their website "how to" does not. Gloss white is also a stated suggestion for base color, but of course as you can imagine will leave a very pale look, although still very reflective.

Practice all you can to get the most gloss first and play around with the three base colors. I use white plastic spoons for this.

If you are fighting a pebble finish, add more thinners and dust it on until it glosses out. Your paint is drying before it hits the model. Change to a higher flow tip and needle if you can, and get that droplet size larger that's coming out of your brush.

Placing a small box over your model immediately after spraying will help take care of the pebbles if you fail. The solvents under the flash drying of the paint will help smooth it out as it sits. Slow the drying time with it, and give it a chance to melt back a bit.

Edited by gluefinger

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