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F4DPhantomII

Best way to paint a glossy sea blue aircraft

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Tried using Airbrush to paint glossy sea blue finish using Model Master paint.Had all kinds of finish problems.Not smooth and glassy at all.How do you guys do it.I am using my trusty Paasche H airbrush.Am about to start a Hobby Boss F-8F Bearcat and a Acc.Miniatures TBM Avenger.Thanks for any tips.

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Model Master enamel Dark Sea Blue (FS15042; NOT Non-specular Sea Blue FS 35042, which is 1. flat, and 2, a different color), thinned with lacquer thinner, shot through a Paasche "H". Thin the paint so that you get a drop barely hanging on a toothpick when you pull it out of the paint, use about 18 PSI give or take a pound or two, and use thin coats to start. Once you have a base layer down, open the spray nozzle a bit and put on a wet coat, heavy just to the point where if you put more on it'll run. Then just set it aside and put a tupperware bowl or something over it to keep dust off, and leave it alone for 3-4 days.

Edited by Joe Hegedus

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Was it a flat of Gloss?

Did you try using a Clear Gloss?

Curt

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Model Master enamel Dark Sea Blue (FS15042; NOT Non-specular Sea Blue FS 35042, which is 1. flat, and 2, a different color), thinned with lacquer thinner, shot through a Paasche "H". Thin the paint so that you get a drop barely hanging on a toothpick when you pull it out of the paint, use about 18 PSI give or take a pound or two, and use thin coats to start. Once you have a base layer down, open the spray nozzle a bit and put on a wet coat, heavy just to the point where if you put more on it'll run. Then just set it aside and put a tupperware bowl or something over it to keep dust off, and leave it alone for 3-4 days.

Thanks Joe will try your recommendation.

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Are you using enamel or acrylic MM? If using the acrylic I use Tamiya thinner just as I would with the Tamiya acrylics and get a nice tough smooth finish.

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Gloss is difficult by it's nature. Any drying of the paint before it hits the surface or too high of pressure can cause a pebbly finish.

Doing a good gloss can take years of refining your airbrush and handling skills. If you want to make it KISS, try using Tamiya's spray bombs in your color. They make it pretty easy.

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As much as it takes - I've noticed that some bottles of paint are thicker when new than others, so the ratio varies. 50-50 is probably a good starting point though.

Edited to correct my poor typing skills...

Edited by Joe Hegedus

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In addition to the other good advice here I'd recommend polishing your GSB paint job with MicroMesh. I usually start with 6000 grit and work my way up to 12000. This'll take care of any imperfections/bits of dust stuck in the finish.

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Are you using enamel or acrylic MM? If using the acrylic I use Tamiya thinner just as I would with the Tamiya acrylics and get a nice tough smooth finish.

Enamel

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Also keep in mind that USN Gloss Sea Blue wasn't (even when new) a *blindingly* glossy paint. On a scale model, even using the same level of gloss as found on the real thing will make it look like a toy. Glossiness decreases dramatically with (scale) distance from a subject due to the scattering effect of atmospheric particulates, so toning down the gloss level achieves a more realistic looking finish. Flat paint with some clear gloss added (I use Tamiya with Future) gives a really easily applied, realistically glossy finish.

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For gloss finishes, I've found over the years that lacquer based paints are the easiest to work with, followed by Enamel, then finally Acrylics. The main differences is in the size of the paint particles. Using Tamiya's yellow cap lacquer thinner will help to break down the paint particles. Priming is also important. I still prime with Tamiya's gray primer, when fully dry I polish with Micromesh pads to 12,000. If the surface isn't smooth, no matter how good a Glosscoat you apply, it will be rough. Prep work is most important. Gloss paints need to flow, so you don't want your paint drying before or as it hits the plastic. 1st coats are misted and cut 50/50. Then the heavier final coats are thinned 40/60 or even 30/70 for darker colors. For flow psi pressure I try to be around 10-12 psi. For my compressor/airbrush setup that is a static 20 psi pressure.

Joel

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what about using a retarder or mixing acrylic with future?

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what about using a retarder or mixing acrylic with future?

I've used a retarder when I experimented with the Italeri acrylics. Didn't seem to make that much of a difference. Thin your paints enough, especially if you use Tamiya Lacquer Thinner, and you really won't need any.

Joel

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Thin the paint so that you get a drop barely hanging on a toothpick when you pull it out of the paint, use about 18 PSI give or take a pound or two, and use thin coats to start. Once you have a base layer down, open the spray nozzle a bit and put on a wet coat, heavy just to the point where if you put more on it'll run. Then just set it aside and put a tupperware bowl or something over it to keep dust off, and leave it alone for 3-4 days.

Do this and then if it still isn't nice and shiny as shiny as you want it then shoot it with a nice coat of clear gloss after a few days.

Edited by Spectre711

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I would respectfully point out that under the FS 595 system that none of the colors are named individually. The FS x5042 is basically a family of a blue color that the end user (not the FS595 system) gives a name too. The first number is what determines if the final product is gloss (1), semi-gloss (2) or flat (3). So FS15042 is Gloss Sea Blue, FS25042 is Semi Gloss Sea Blue and FS35042 is Flat Sea Blue. And as far as I can tell, Non-Specular is late 1930's Navy speak for a Flat color.

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All of the FS colors were actually given to the GSA to publish and distribute by the users of the colors.

The three ANA Sea Blue colors that were originally given to the GSA to publish as FS numbers had names, and were different at the time they were submitted. The GSA messed up in 1984 and tried to be the agency dictating the colors to choose from, instead of just continuing to collect the colors and distribute. Also, "Glossy", "Semi-Gloss" and "Non-Specular" terms for FS colors were used at least into the late 70's and early 80's.

But, for all Aircraft before 1984, the colors varied on the same line,,,,,and had names assigned to them by the end-user agencies. This is based on John Elliot's published works, with color matches done by the Munsell company,,,,,,and supported by Dana Bell in many public posts.

I know there are many sites based on the IPMS booklet, and IPMS Stockholm,,,,,,but, mixing pre-1984 and post-1984 FS is the same as saying that RLM and RAL colors are exactly the same. (and the IPMS booklet was based on an error made at about the same time that the Elliot chips were being "Munselled" by the Munsell company,,,,,,and the IPMS booklet would have been correct if Dave had just used an old FS set instead of the "550 color" brand new set that came out when he was writing,,,,,the very set that started the GSA error)

And this is a good place to add that colors weren't/aren't mixed by paint suppliers/contracters using the 3 X 5 cards as so many think, either,,,,,,,they are mixed with the CIE-Lab data, and checked with the 3 X 5 cards.

the fact that Glossy Sea Blue is different from Semi-Gloss Sea Blue and Non-Specular Sea Blue is the reason that some of us call what used to be known as the Tri-Color USN scheme by terms meaning "Four Color scheme",,,,,,,,,and is born out by the three blues having different Munsell numbers (and in the Munsell system changing the sheen doesn't change the number)

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