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Joel_W

GWH 1/48 scale F-15C

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Two things Joel: Good idea gluing on the windscreen early, so that you can fix any seam flaws now and the gap to the fuselage is minimized. Too often I see great models but the windscreen looks like it was glued on last and there's a big gap at the base, because it was!

Second, welcome to MM enamels, which I use exclusively. Your spray mixture sounds about perfect and you'll find that the flatter colors dry fairly quickly. Remember to sand each coat with 1500-2000 grit sandpaper between coats and at the very end, just prior to a clear coat. Your modeling and painting is absolutely excellent! :thumbsup:/>/>

Chuck,

Thank you for taking the time to stop by and check out my build blog.

Funny thing about paint mixtures, but Peter, my brother when he shoots MM enamels uses ratios of more paint to thinner! go figure. I just started to really rub out paints between colors and clear coats, but I'm much more conservative with the grits: I use 8,000 followed by 12,000. I'm actually concerned about polishing through the paint with 4,000 & 6,000. These are the grits I have in my Micro Mesh pad kit. I do use a few liquid scratch removers by Mequiar's: Scratch X 2.0 for fine polishing, and for the other end of the spectrum for really rough paint I do have Polishing compound, which is more of a cream then a liquid.

As for the windscreen issue, I've been attaching windscreens since one day of my modeling journey. To me I treat them as just another kit part. And as you said, I've seen way too many outstanding models fall short as a finished display piece from a really poorly fitted windscreen, cockpit glass, or window, etc. Many times there is a disclaimer and or an apology, which never made much sense to me.

Joel

Edited by Joel_W

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Great work as usual Joel. A silent compressor is a very nice way to go. I have a Sprint-jet I bought from eBay years ago but it's not silent. I used it for a short bit but then lost trust in it after it shot water out during a painting session.....and yes......I did have a moisture trap. I then went back to my trusty CO2 tank but eventually got tired of replacing tanks at 30 bucks a pop so I'm back to the compressor. Tanks are great if you can get a good deal on one that includes a regulator and a gage as opposed to dropping a few hundred on a silent compressor. In the long run though. .....a compressor will be cheaper. Tanks can also require some form of heating to the regulator as it will get extremely cold during long painting sessions. I used a flood lamp connected to the neck of the tank prior to painting to mitigate the effects of the cold.

Good luck

Wardog,

Thanks for stopping by and appreciating my efforts to date.

Those are some excellent points about a CO2 tank. The refill cost I figured wouldn't be much of a problem as a tank should last me a year, at least that was my thinking. I had no idea of the heating issue for the regulator as my paint sessions can last a few hours. Not something I really want to have to deal with. On the other hand, a silent compressor will likely set me back around $200 with shipping, but it's a one time deal for the life of the compressor. The issue is what will that life span be? I have two compressors now. One in the Garage for tires and dirty work which is more then 30 years old and is on it's last legs. I have a much more efficient household compressor that I keep inside for mostly modeling, but blowing out the sprinkler system is one of it's functions. It has two gauges, and a regulator, and while it's psi range is much more then a modeler would ever need, it does regulate down to 5 psi or so. The 1 1/2 gallon tank once full doesn't require many refills during a painting session, and it only takes a min or two to refill the tank to it's max level. The issue is the noise according to my wife, which negates night time sessions. That compressor will replace the outside compressor, so it's a win win situation. At least that's how I'll sell the idea to my wife, who will just tell me to do what I want, and be done with it.

Joel

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Wardog,

Thanks for stopping by and appreciating my efforts to date.

Those are some excellent points about a CO2 tank. The refill cost I figured wouldn't be much of a problem as a tank should last me a year, at least that was my thinking. I had no idea of the heating issue for the regulator as my paint sessions can last a few hours. Not something I really want to have to deal with. On the other hand, a silent compressor will likely set me back around $200 with shipping, but it's a one time deal for the life of the compressor. The issue is what will that life span be? I have two compressors now. One in the Garage for tires and dirty work which is more then 30 years old and is on it's last legs. I have a much more efficient household compressor that I keep inside for mostly modeling, but blowing out the sprinkler system is one of it's functions. It has two gauges, and a regulator, and while it's psi range is much more then a modeler would ever need, it does regulate down to 5 psi or so. The 1 1/2 gallon tank once full doesn't require many refills during a painting session, and it only takes a min or two to refill the tank to it's max level. The issue is the noise according to my wife, which negates night time sessions. That compressor will replace the outside compressor, so it's a win win situation. At least that's how I'll sell the idea to my wife, who will just tell me to do what I want, and be done with it.

Joel

Sounds like you're on the right track. I've never owned a silent compressor but it really is a great way to go if you can afford it.I paint in my garage and even though my compressor is a bit noisy, the sound seems to intensify inside the house........sound like jack-hammers being used outside on the street. A few other things to keep in mind about CO2 tanks which i forgot to mention. If you develop a leak which you are unaware of and forget to close the valve after a painting session, you will most likely be greeted by an empty tank next time you try to paint, this is assuming there is a lengthy period in between painting sessions (don't ask how i know). You might ask....how do you not hear a leak and I'll respond with...jet engine noise does nothing good for your hearing. With my tank I also developed an issue where i was experiencing a decrement in air pressure at the airbrush during long painting sessions.........the culprit, an internal filter within the regulator that was experiencing blockage due to ice build-up. I removed the filter and the issue was solved.

Good luck

E.

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I have just bought one myself.

Your building inspires.

I ll keep watching this excellent thread.

Polar Bear,

Thank you for your most positive comment. Please feel free to stick around for the whole build.

Did you just buy a tank or a compressor?

Joel

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Sounds like you're on the right track. I've never owned a silent compressor but it really is a great way to go if you can afford it.I paint in my garage and even though my compressor is a bit noisy, the sound seems to intensify inside the house........sound like jack-hammers being used outside on the street. A few other things to keep in mind about CO2 tanks which i forgot to mention. If you develop a leak which you are unaware of and forget to close the valve after a painting session, you will most likely be greeted by an empty tank next time you try to paint, this is assuming there is a lengthy period in between painting sessions (don't ask how i know). You might ask....how do you not hear a leak and I'll respond with...jet engine noise does nothing good for your hearing. With my tank I also developed an issue where i was experiencing a decrement in air pressure at the airbrush during long painting sessions.........the culprit, an internal filter within the regulator that was experiencing blockage due to ice build-up. I removed the filter and the issue was solved.

Good luck

E.

Just checked with my brother who corrected my poor memory.

As I mentioned earlier, back in the 70s my brother used a dive tank with a duel regulator. He had the tank filled at a fire extinguisher company with CO2, not compressed air.

Joel

Joel

Edited by Joel_W

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Hello Joel,

It's a really beautiful work so far. Well done! :thumbsup:/>

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Joel Nice build!!

About the MM enamel paints, I agree with Chuck about sanding between coats as this knocks down any fuzzing that comes with the matte paints. I use 3M 3000 grit that is on a sponge backing and find it perfect for this task(found it in the automotive section). Also a good indicator of paint dryness is the old nose sniff test, I have recently painted an F-4S Phantom about 10 days ago and I can still detect a hint of odor. Patients is the name of the game. So far you have done a stellar job, and have really enjoyed watching. Thanks, and hope this is useful to you.

Anthony

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What beautiful kit and what a beautiful build here Joel!

If only we poor 1/72 stepson received some attention from producer,look like,with few ecception,the best producer project are 1/48-1/32 oriented...

Anyway,I planned for the future a DS 36th TFW f-15C so great thread like your are a welcomed reference!

Keep up the good work Joel! :thumbsup:

Gianni

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Sacred grass muncher! That kit's pure plastic porn, I got to get one!
This is without a doubt the best engineered kit I've ever built. Every fit issue that's associated with the Hasegawa kit, they've seemed to address, and come up with a better way.
I've already closed up the electrical panels on both sides of the nose, and am really inclined to do the same with the nose cone.

First off, thanks for the build. I have got myself one of these kits and will enjoy it now that I know the closed up fit is that good.

Since I prefer Sharkmouth schemes, buttoned up is the only way to appreciate it as well as the aerodynamic beauty of the aircraft. I may get the Pit Road F-15J if I can see any reason to buy it (additional parts?) or will get another GWH.

Regards,

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Hello Joel,

It's a really beautiful work so far. Well done! :thumbsup:/>/>

Motta,

Thanks so much for stopping by,. Glad you like what I've accomplished so far.

Joel

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Joel Nice build!!

About the MM enamel paints, I agree with Chuck about sanding between coats as this knocks down any fuzzing that comes with the matte paints. I use 3M 3000 grit that is on a sponge backing and find it perfect for this task(found it in the automotive section). Also a good indicator of paint dryness is the old nose sniff test, I have recently painted an F-4S Phantom about 10 days ago and I can still detect a hint of odor. Patients is the name of the game. So far you have done a stellar job, and have really enjoyed watching. Thanks, and hope this is useful to you.

Anthony

NavyF4s,

I usually leave the rubbing out after I finish all the color coats. I'm real leery about polishing too much or too hard, so I just use 8,000 and 12,000 Micro Mesh pads wet, but very lightly.

10 days and you still can detect an odor. I was hoping to be able to clear coat with Pledge after 5 days.

And thank you for stopping by and having a look at my progress to date.

Joel

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What beautiful kit and what a beautiful build here Joel!

If only we poor 1/72 stepson received some attention from producer,look like,with few ecception,the best producer project are 1/48-1/32 oriented...

Anyway,I planned for the future a DS 36th TFW f-15C so great thread like your are a welcomed reference!

Keep up the good work Joel! :thumbsup:/>

Gianni

Gianni

yeah, times has sure changed. Back in the 1970's it was all about 1/72 scale. Still, there is a lot of new 1/72 kits coming out all the time.

And thanks for taking the time to stop by and having a look.

Joel

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Since I prefer Sharkmouth schemes, buttoned up is the only way to appreciate it as well as the aerodynamic beauty of the aircraft. I may get the Pit Road F-15J if I can see any reason to buy it (additional parts?) or will get another GWH.

I have both the Pit Road offerings (J & DJ), but can't say for certain that theres any difference from the standard C and B/D kits. I have a GWH B/D on order, but it hasnt arrived yet, but when it does, I can check for differences or additional parts.

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First off, thanks for the build. I have got myself one of these kits and will enjoy it now that I know the closed up fit is that good.

Since I prefer Sharkmouth schemes, buttoned up is the only way to appreciate it as well as the aerodynamic beauty of the aircraft. I may get the Pit Road F-15J if I can see any reason to buy it (additional parts?) or will get another GWH.

Regards,

Sharkmouth,

I've built more then my fair share of kits over the years. I've seen up close and personal the good, the bad, and the ugly, so I thought I've seen just about the full spectrum. But the GWH kit is just that much better then just good. I've built their TBD-1 Devastator which had some scale issues long with not so great folding wings, and their 2nd boxing of the P-61A Black Widow which has some fit issues, especially the windscreen and a lot of the glass, so I was expecting a good kit, but was prepared to do my fair share of work improving it. I just wasn't prepared for how high they raised their standards and the execution of those standards.

Joel

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Got a question that I'm hoping a few of you will know the answer to. As I said before, this is the 1st time that I've used Model Master enamels rather then Tamiya Acrylics. And while I know that enamels take a much longer time to dry, I'm not sure if 5 days is long enough this time of year with the very low humidity (been in the mid 40%) before I mask the top and bottom exhaust areas to start the Alcad 11 process. My other concern is that the Tamiya tape (detacked) might pull up some of the paint. What's the shortest time most of you would wait?

Joel

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If you thin them with Lacquer thinners they dry pretty quickly. I've usually been able to handle them in 20-30 mins after painting.

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If you thin them with Lacquer thinners they dry pretty quickly. I've usually been able to handle them in 20-30 mins after painting.

I thinned the Model Master enamels with their Universal thinner in the Red can.

Joel

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Joel

Paint lifting is a combination of plastic surface prep. and paint drying time. MM paint after 5 days is a good time for drying and should handle any taping especially if you have de-tacked the tape. Again the old nose test is the best indicator of dry paint, if you can smell it, it's still off gassing. Lacquer paint drys much faster. I've taped the alclad stuff after 8-10 hours with no problems. Hope this helps

Anthony

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Joel

Paint lifting is a combination of plastic surface prep. and paint drying time. MM paint after 5 days is a good time for drying and should handle any taping especially if you have de-tacked the tape. Again the old nose test is the best indicator of dry paint, if you can smell it, it's still off gassing. Lacquer paint drys much faster. I've taped the alclad stuff after 8-10 hours with no problems. Hope this helps

Anthony

Anthony,

Thanks for the reply. I was thinking about a min of 5 days too.

Joel

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After letting the base MM enamel FS 36375 Light Ghost Gray dry for a few days, it was time for the camo paint scheme. Originally I had intended to use MM FS36320 Dark Ghost Gray. But while doing more research I became more and more confused as to what was the proper pair of colors should be. I've found a multitude of combinations and tones. So I did more Google searches for ANG units, and of course I found variations in the tonality of the dark Ghost Gray. I found a few pictures where the paint was actually a Bluish Gray, and it just seemed different enough to interest me. So I decided to try and replicate it, but toned done a bit, since the odds are that the digital camera's sensor didn't exactly get it correct.

F-15_102ndFW_BBB_7788.jpg

My1st attempt was pretty poor. Ok, is was worse then poor. Just to much blue, and to stark compared to the Light Ghost Gray. So I remixed the MM enamel Ghost Gray with less Blue, a tinge of International Black, and repainted the Eagle. Better, but still a little too dark and still too contrasty. I decided that an overall filter of Light Ghost Gray would do the trick. I'm pretty satisfied with the results at this stage, realizing that the modest weathering that I will do after decaling will further darken and tone down the colors.

Joel

F-15C01_11_15_134.jpg

http://s68.photobuck...5_132.jpg.html]F-15C01_11_15_132.jpg[/url]

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Edited by Joel_W

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Looks good! I imagine the flash from the camera is washing it out just a little bit, though

Nicholassagan,

It's only part of the problem. I'm using a Nikon D90 and two separate light sources. The main one is off to the left. I used the small on camera flash as the sensor is really struggling with the color combination. The RAW images have consistently tinted the Light Ghost Gray slightly with a colder Bluish tint. I guess I should have spent a lot more time in Post Editing, but once the weathering starts, the tones will drastically change.

Looking at the model rather then the picture, the Light Ghost Gray dominates the color paint scheme, and the Bluish Light Ghost Gray has that separate tonality.

Believe me, I really struggled with this.

Joel

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Hi Joel - your works looks great. Glad to see the pic furnished to me by the 102nd FW is helpful ;-)

I am confused on the painting colors though - you mention MM Medium Gray FS3625; Medium Gray has a different FS number, but, 36251 is the proper one for the MOD Eagle base color.

But then you state this:

"After letting the base MM enamel FS 36375 Light Ghost Gray dry for a few days"

I looked through the thread but didn't see anything where you may have repainted it to the old ghost grey scheme?

If you want the colors for the MOD Eagle scheme, here's a profile.

http://www.cybermodeler.com/aircraft/f-15/images/f-15_profile02.png

Which markings and time frame are you going to go with? The kit decals and the Caracal Models one you posted are all MOD Eagle.

If you want to see more references of MOD Eagle schemes/markings, you can see here

hope that helps,

Ken

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If you want to see more references of MOD Eagle schemes/markings, you can see here

hope that helps,

Ken

AWESOME pics there Ken, WOW! :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

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