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donc375

What airbrush compressor should I buy

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I am looking to buy a airbrush compressor and would like some input as to which one I should purchase. I am currently using a Paasche H with a regulated air tank that I fill with a Campbell Hausfeld 2 gallon air compressor. I mainly use MM enamels and spray around 20 PSI.

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Type "airbrush compressor" into the search box on ARC and you will have all the info you will ever need.

Bob

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My advice would be to avoid cheap or "budget" ones. I've had three compressors over the past five years that have blown out. You really do get what you pay for and in my experience if you skimp here you just end up replacing them more frequently.

Don't buy one that doesn't have a tank. They pulsate, but they also run constantly which means they build up heat and moisture much faster. You also want one with a regulator and moisture trap, but most all have those anyway.

Also, be sure to check the minimum working pressure. 20 psi is way too high for me. I'm around 8-10 almost always...and you may find yourself progressing to lower pressures as you advance with airbrushing...though again, most any you look at will be adequate.

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Have to agree with Triarius, California Air Tools make a real nice, quiet compressor. I opted for the 6310 model.

Steve

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Another vote for California Air Tools. I have the exact same one Triarious linked to.

Rob

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I'm yet another California Air Tools customer. I have the same one Triarius and Galileo have. The one thing I wish it had is a larger tank, but it is otherwise great.

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I looked at the California Air Tools compressor and tank combo a few months ago when I was looking for a compressor/tank combo. On my budget though I went with the Master Airbrush Model TC-40T. It's even quieter than my first compressor and what I really like about it is that it has a fan. There is not much air flow where I have to keep the compressor so I always worry about the unit overheating. So far so good!

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Get a Paasche air compressor with a reserve tank and you'll love it. I also use a Paasche H with MM enamels.

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I have an CALIFORNIA AIR TOOLS 1650A and I love this thing. It is very quite and has been reliable so far.

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Don't limit yourself to hobby products....Try thinking outside the box a bit... 2 years ago I went with a Senco 1010. It has a 1gal tank High quality regulator and is built for construction type trim work. Now while not ultra quiet it is way quieter than you would expect. Rated at around 78db. I can hold a normal level conversation if it kicks on. I paid a mere 110.00 shipped to me through amazon. Currently I run it with 3 air hose manifold set up. I have as a test used 2 at a time and it handles the load with NO PROBLEM. next I am going to hook up a 5 outlet manifold with 2 addition quick disconnects.... I expect it will last 15 to 20 years with a heavy workload. Since I bought mine they have come out with a quiet model reated at 68db it is the 1010N Here is a link to the one I bought... http://www.senco.com/tools/details-page/pc1010 and for the 1010N http://www.senco.com/tools/details-page/pc1010n and the amazon page.... http://www.amazon.com/Senco-PC1010-1-Horsepower-1-Gallon-Compressor/dp/B0000AQK78/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1439757460&sr=8-1&keywords=senco+1010

HTH and good luck with your search...

Edited by viper730

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I always put in my 2 cents for CO2. It's **totally** silent, and the only moving parts are in the valve and the regulator. You never (ever) get any moisture, and it's a real pleasure to spray with. I'd never go back to a compressor in a million years.

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Jennings,

How often are you recharging the tank? When you do. Do you swap the whole tank for a new one at the distributor, like a propane tank, or something different?

I love the idea of CO2. I need to explore that because I would have other applications for CO2 use also.

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Compressors are fun for running air tools and inflating tires but you can't go wrong with CO2. Your initial investment is the 'bottle' which they usually swap every time you refill. If you can find a semi rusted one for cheap then that's the way to go, otherwise you're probably looking at an initial investment of around $125 for a ten pound tank rig. The real advantage is the regulator; I've got a medical grade CO2 unit and use it at 3 psi for luftwaffe camouflage but you can get a less expensive unit and spray around 5 psi or higher depending on your application.

hth

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Jennings,

How often are you recharging the tank? When you do. Do you swap the whole tank for a new one at the distributor, like a propane tank, or something different?

I love the idea of CO2. I need to explore that because I would have other applications for CO2 use also.

It depends on how many and what size models you're building. At the rate I build - years :)/> Seriously, a 20 lb tank will do a LOT of airbrushing (a *LOT*). I purchased the tank, and when it's empty, I take it back and get a fresh one (with a more recent inspection date, as required by law) from the distributor.

I paid around $120 (including the fill) for a 20# tank last year. Another $30 for a regulator, and you're off to the races.

As far as I'm concerned, CO2 is the only way to power an airbrush.

Edited by Jennings

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Whats wrong with the compressor your using now??I'd buy a regulator that has a water trap and just run hose from the compressors current location to your work bench, unless your compressor is out of town....

Curt

100_6830filter_zpsca0b71bd.jpg

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I always put in my 2 cents for CO2. It's **totally** silent, and the only moving parts are in the valve and the regulator. You never (ever) get any moisture, and it's a real pleasure to spray with. I'd never go back to a compressor in a million years.

Any recommendations on a valve and regulator? Just bought a new airbrush and if I can get away from using a compressor then I'll drop the dime for a co2 tank.

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Compressors are fun for running air tools and inflating tires but you can't go wrong with CO2. Your initial investment is the 'bottle' which they usually swap every time you refill. If you can find a semi rusted one for cheap then that's the way to go, otherwise you're probably looking at an initial investment of around $125 for a ten pound tank rig. The real advantage is the regulator; I've got a medical grade CO2 unit and use it at 3 psi for luftwaffe camouflage but you can get a less expensive unit and spray around 5 psi or higher depending on your application.

hth

The Keeper, Sir, I have three questions for you about the CO2 unit:

1. Approximately how many hours of spraying do you get out of a 10# set-up?

2. How big is the 10# set-up? I've seen people mention a 20# set-up.

3. How much $$$ does it cost to fill the 10# tank?

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I always put in my 2 cents for CO2. It's **totally** silent, and the only moving parts are in the valve and the regulator. You never (ever) get any moisture, and it's a real pleasure to spray with. I'd never go back to a compressor in a million years.

Why use CO2 instead of a tank of compressed air?

Edited by Rocky

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