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balls47

NASCAR

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Shhhhhh, I almost feel like I'm steppin' out on the better half. I'm gonna do a (GULP!!!) model car. :scared0016:/>

Actually, I'm gonna be doing two kits. Both are Monogram kits of Bill Elliot's #94 McDonald's car. I'm not a big NASCAR fan, but my neighbor is, and his favorite driver is (you guessed it) Bill Elliot. He lived a good part of his life in Hickory, NC.This is THE heart of NASCAR country. We've gone to quite a few NASCAR races together, but not for several years. I just realized what I am doing. Due to the guilt that I have from thinking about building a car model, I'm making excuses to quell the guilt. Oh, what the hell, here goes. What's the best way to put the markings on the rubber tires

that come with the kit? Paint the markings that are on the tire, or put the waterslide decals on the tires? Now my big question. HOW??? (on both decals and/or painting) I appreciate any advice that may be coming my way, and thanks in advance. AND THEN, IT'S BACK TO AIRCRAFT!!!

Edited by balls47

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Decals are the easiest way. You will need to either sand off the raised letters, or turn the tire around. In order to do that, you will need to cut out the ring in the middle of the tire since it is not in the middle of the tire.

Some people feel the decals look too nice and too clean. The alternative is to use a stencil and airbrush the tire.

The kit may have the tire decals, if not you can get them here:

http://www.mikesdecals.com/index.php?cPath=6&osCsid=f406c19ebc244e43b69983b8c59c5423

I think Replicas & miniatures company of Maryland still makes the airbrush stencil

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Decals are the easiest way. You will need to either sand off the raised letters, or turn the tire around. In order to do that, you will need to cut out the ring in the middle of the tire since it is not in the middle of the tire.

Some people feel the decals look too nice and too clean. The alternative is to use a stencil and airbrush the tire.

The kit may have the tire decals, if not you can get them here:

http://www.mikesdecals.com/index.php?cPath=6&osCsid=f406c19ebc244e43b69983b8c59c5423

I think Replicas & miniatures company of Maryland still makes the airbrush stencil

Thanks for the reply Kurt. I may try the kit decals. I read a couple of different guys that liked the Revell/Monogram kit decals.

Several years ago, Lindburg put our a 1/24 scale "snap kit" of an Ohio State Highway Patrol car. It was the charcoal gray Ford Crown

Vic that the OSHP had for several years. The kit didn't need painted, because the color was pretty much a dead-on match. I did a little detail painting and scratchbuilding. The kit decals were very nice, but I bought a few copies of a Chimneyville decal sheet that

had OSHP decals on it. Anyway, this kit could be completed in an evening. These were the extent of my car building experience. So,

I thank you for the advice. If you have anymore NASCAR advice, I'm game.

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I have built a few of them over the years. It is a fun niche in the hobby. I Started in high school in the early 90s when NASCAR modeling was all the rage. I still build one occasionally.

There is still a lot of good info out there. The one thing that you may find you want to to do increase the realism of the model is to lower the suspension.

Here is the last one I built

IMGP1754-vi.jpg

The things to really watch out for are to make sure you are careful with the alignment of the roll cage parts, and ensure you solidly cement the suspension parts together. The attachment point are small and this is the area that the model might start falling apart even with careful handling.

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I built a couple of them in high school as well, and I remember seeing an article in one of the car modeling magazines on how to do them which is how I did mine. I started by making a mandrel to mount the tire on that would fit in my Dremel tool. I used a bolt that would fit the mandrel and then found a couple washers that fit into the ridge in the tire and used a couple nuts on the other side to pinch the whole assemble together kind of like a bead lock. You chuck the whole thing up in your Dremel and run it at a low speed. You can then start with 320 grit and smooth the whole thing out both side walls and "tread", then go over the whole thing again with 400, you might have to wet sand it, I can't quite remember. Finish up with 600 on the side walls only. After you do all four, you mist glosscoat onto the sidewalls, decal them up and the hit the whole thing with dull coat. From what I remember it was pretty easy and looked really good when it was done.

-Dave

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If you do paint the tires make sure n use acrylic water based paint only. Enamels and lacquers do not dry on the rubber compound kit tires are made of.

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