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beingthehero

Weird/odd museum restorations?

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Sometimes, museums could benefit from the rivet counters of the scale modelling community, often due to the "creative liberties" they'll take with aircraft.

For example, China acquired a captured Soviet Mi-24 from Pakistan. It was repainted at Datangshan in what can be best described as camouflage suited to hide among butterflies or a kid's art project: http://i.imgur.com/F5HyAqX.jpg

(I believe it has since been repainted in a more realistic scheme.)

At Monino, there is a MiG-25RBT...with missile pylons than no recon Foxbat ever had: http://i.imgur.com/ZFymRzw.jpg

There's also a MiG-25PD...with no missile pylons: http://svsm.org/albums/mig25sz/MiG_25_Monino.jpg

Switcharoo, I guess? Anybody know of any other less than accurate restorations?

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Less accurate restorations...hmmm? CAF aircraft with their giant logo applied to them.

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When the Confederate Air Force first started acquiring WW-II fighters, they painted them overall white with red and blue trim.

Grumman F4F Wildcat

CAF-F4F%20Wildcat%2001_zpstdt7btgv.jpg

FG-1 Corsair

CAF-FG-1D-Corsair-300x176_zpsjmroqevz.jpg

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For example, China acquired a captured Soviet Mi-24 from Pakistan. It was repainted at Datangshan in what can be best described as camouflage suited to hide among butterflies or a kid's art project: http://i.imgur.com/F5HyAqX.jpg

Oh, I'd like a shirt with that print.

The Fiat C.R. 42 in London has a funny camouflage, although not as removed from reality as that Mi-24.

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A decal sheet with that on it could almost get me to build a Russian aircraft.

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A couple of very recent museum restorations that have me looking for a "Picard Facepalm" meme. First up is the sole-surviving PB2Y Coronado at the US Naval Aviation Museum. They spent several years doing a beautiful job on the aircraft, only to give it a totally bogus paint job: Dark Blue over White (a scheme never used by the USN during WWII) and "borderless" national isnignia. My hope is that at some point they might add the Intermediate Blue to the sides and tails.

IMG_8694.jpg

And then don't get me started on this abomination. An ultra-rare Ford/Willow Run built B-24J at Barksdale AFB, tarted up as a B-24D Ploesti Raider. This aircraft had been in bare metal, and was just painted LAST YEAR! I understand the need to paint an aircraft that's on outdoor display, but was it that hard to come up with some reasonably accurate markings? I guess they figured it's just an old junker..most people won't notice or care.

Barksdale%2004.jpg

SN

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That surprises me that Pensacola painted an inaccurate scheme on that. You would think they would strive for historical accuracy. Did you notice the props are also different? One is a three bladed prop while the other is a four bladed one.

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Did you notice the props are also different? One is a three bladed prop while the other is a four bladed one.

Pretty sure that is accurate. Can't remember why but I do recall seeing pictures of it like that from when it was in service. I am sure someone with more knowledge than me can be more informative.

Sean

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Pretty sure that is accurate. Can't remember why but I do recall seeing pictures of it like that from when it was in service. I am sure someone with more knowledge than me can be more informative.

For what it's worth:

http://worldwar2headquarters.com/HTML/aircraft/americanAircraft/coronado.html

Interestingly, the inboard engines had four-bladed propellers which were 2 inches shorter than the three-bladed propellers on the outboard motors. The shorter inboard blades were used to avoid the splash from the hull during take-off and landing.

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Did you notice the props are also different? One is a three bladed prop while the other is a four bladed one.

That's because they used two of the prop blades to make pylons on the floor.

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4 blades: assume you refer to PB2Y.

It is correct. Some had an engine series change giving more power but the required 3-blade props had too large a diameter to fit between the inboard engines and fuselage. Thus 4 blades to take advantage of added power while keeping the arc within limits.

BTW: DC-7 with 4 blade props and same engine type compared to Constellations---4 blade props smaller diameter allowing same ground clearance as DC-4 and 6 from which -7 was developed.

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Yardbird78 neat pictures. I have never seen those before. Thanks for posting them :thumbsup: .

:cheers:

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The Southern Museum of Flight in Birmingham has an F-4S painted in SEA camo with the 117th Recon squadron markings.

12707670.jpg

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The sharkmouth on USS TORSK in Baltimore. (Only USS BAYA has photographic proof of wearing a sharkmouth) Sorry, you didn't specify aircraft.

Cheers,

Dave

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Here's one I'm trying to understand...relatively minor, I admit, but it seems the F-89J displayed in Burlington Vermont as part of the Vermont ANG display DID actually fly with the Vermont ANG, but they changed the tail number from 53-2494 to 0-21883. Why bother?? :unsure:

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Here's one I'm trying to understand...relatively minor, I admit, but it seems the F-89J displayed in Burlington Vermont as part of the Vermont ANG display DID actually fly with the Vermont ANG, but they changed the tail number from 53-2494 to 0-21883. Why bother?? :unsure:/>

Former Commander's tail number???

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Here's one I'm trying to understand...relatively minor, I admit, but it seems the F-89J displayed in Burlington Vermont as part of the Vermont ANG display DID actually fly with the Vermont ANG, but they changed the tail number from 53-2494 to 0-21883. Why bother?? :unsure:/>/>

That kinda irks me too. I get that every base wants a "MiG Killer" or some other famous plane. But damn, stop changing serial numbers. Both Elmo and Eielson have F-4C's in Alaska markings which were never stationed at either base.

2014-12-03-15-58-42.png

Edited by adamitri

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The Southern Museum of Flight in Birmingham has an F-4S painted in SEA camo with the 117th Recon squadron markings.

12707670.jpg

That looks like a F-4N, not an S.

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Less accurate restorations...hmmm? CAF aircraft with their giant logo applied to them.

Now, really....Why would the "Canadian Armed Forces" not use their own markings?monketdance4.gif

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There is whatever squadron scheme the planes on "The Yard" at USNA get painted in.

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Or the Lackland Parade Ground, home of a (very rare) P-47N masquerading as Gabreki's D, and an even rarer P-51H painted as Preddy's D.

SN

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The Wings and Rotors Museum in California is nearing completion of the 11th pre production Phantom. F4H-1F 145310 did only test work including some of the Sageburner tests. Mostly in some snazzy, bright dayglo markings, then retired in 1964. But the museum has for some reason decided to paint the aircraft in the Bicentennial scheme of an F-4J of VF-101. 101 utilized some of the F4H-1s in training in the early 1960s, but not in markings that were 15 years away and for a later version. I don't get it.

http://wingsandrotors.org/phantom-f4/

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I'm no F-104 expert but this does not quite seem authentic to me. I took these photos at the Chanute Museum. I'd be interested if this resto is actually accurate.

DSC00785_zps1jkvnbep.jpg

DSC00782_zpsgqgufbgn.jpg

DSC00781_zps1mhyvoat.jpg

DSC00784_zpsqixuiyds.jpg

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