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Great Navy Hornet (and others) Weathering Ref Shot

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It's always Peanut Butter Jelly time!!!

 

Well in the "old" days it used to be if the Wardroom O was so nice to be keeping PB&J out in the Dirty Shirt for aircrew to grab a bite to eat on they way to man-up (well crap, should I be saying "crew-up" these days??).

 

Collin

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And just because it's a free country...and I love the S-3, I was cruising around my old squadron and found this photo.  Great upper shot of our well worn 706 (think my name was on the right side of that aircraft).

 

Really shows a late cruise aircraft with fluid staining around the wing and tail fin fold lines...plus all the touch up painting (the corrosion control officer was my stateroom buddy...he was always on his folks to touch up the paint). 

 

Cheers

 

http://www.navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv62-96/354.htm

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There are two officer wardrooms on a carrier.  One typically aft/mid ship which is known as the "clean shirt" where the CO of the Boat and ships crew eat.  Rules vary from boat to boat (and even CO to CO) but typical rules are that you have to be wearing your khaki uniform to eat there (no flight suits or working uniforms).   There is also another wardroom forward that is called the "dirty shirt".  That is where uniforms like flight suits and dirty working uniforms can be worn (our Shooters were filthy most of the time...they only shot from the roof and not from a bubble). 

 

The dirty shirt is typically where the air crew hung out....it was away from higher management and you could let your hair down a little more.  On CV-62 and 63, we tried to honor the khaki rule most of the time....but during heavy flight ops while underway...the CO of the boat and CAG had an agreement that crews in a rush to make flights could eat wherever then needed.  Food was about the same in both wardrooms...not that great.  Typically the coffee and "dog" machines were in better working order in the dirty shirt (because we "took care" of the enlisted that maintained those items). 

 

Cheers

Collin

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Wooow Collin, excellent pictures!! Those are the real 50 shades of grey! Iwish I'd replicate those effects on my kits. Talking about the picture with the two Prowlers on the elevator, does the one on the left lack the golden tint on the front canopy?

Thanks again for those nice pics!

I.Martin

Edited by I.Martin
Typo

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Wow great images. Thanks for posting Collin. It is interesting to see how the crew cleans the aircraft. You would think it would be some sort of pressure washer but thinking about it I guess fresh water on a carrier would be in limited supply unless there are desalination plants on board. Would you not need some sort of pressure wash to get the slat and grime out of the cracks and crevices of your typical military aircraft at sea?

 

Just wondering aloud here :dontknow:

 

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1 hour ago, skyhawk174 said:

Wow great images. Thanks for posting Collin. It is interesting to see how the crew cleans the aircraft. You would think it would be some sort of pressure washer but thinking about it I guess fresh water on a carrier would be in limited supply unless there are desalination plants on board. Would you not need some sort of pressure wash to get the slat and grime out of the cracks and crevices of your typical military aircraft at sea?

 

Just wondering aloud here :dontknow:

 

 

Chris,

 

We do use pressure and carriers do have water desalination. We always pre-wash the heavy grime areas with an approved cleaner and scrub with a brush. Everything is sealed first to prevent water ingression and everything is greased afterwords. We also don't fly for 12 hours after a wash job, in case water has accumulated anywhere.

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1 hour ago, skyhawk174 said:

... You would think it would be some sort of pressure washer but thinking about it I guess fresh water on a carrier would be in limited supply unless there are desalination plants on board. ...

All ships need potable water; steam ships also need boiler water.. Evaporators or distillers provide fresh water, which is critical for ships.

 

However, fresh water is still a precious shipboard resource, so there's no wasting it...

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2 hours ago, dnl42 said:

All ships need potable water; steam ships also need boiler water.. Evaporators or distillers provide fresh water, which is critical for ships.

 

However, fresh water is still a precious shipboard resource, so there's no wasting it...

 

A typical Supercarrier in the US military uses nuclear power to desalinate 400,000 US gallons (1,500,000 l; 330,000 imp gal) of water per day.

 

I was on TD in San Diego and toured the USS Ronald Reagan, one of the engineering officers was explaining how they have provided water for many natural disasters around the world.

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Very interesting stuff. Beautiful photos, I was especially glad about the Prowler shots. But the shirt thing was interesting as well! Thanks for posting!

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On 2/15/2017 at 1:42 PM, Slartibartfast said:

From where does all that dirt on the tail come???  Are crewmen walking up the vertical stab of Vikings?  

I imagine they could and did, although what we see in these photos could be normal leaking lubricants and flight deck grime. The Viking tail was tall enough that it had to be built with a fold to fit in the hangar bay. As to whether you were supposed to walk on it, I'll defer to those who worked with them to say.

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On 2/15/2017 at 11:14 AM, Collin said:

050121-N-5345W-306.jpg

Remember kids, you must have a black preshading around all the edges of your panels. It's gotta be black, too. You need that contrast around the panels! The paint crew on this Viking obviously did it wrong with their light panel shading.

Edited by RedHeadKevin

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