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Great Navy Hornet (and others) Weathering Ref Shot


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6 hours ago, Mr Matt Foley said:

It is amazing just how close to the size of an Eagle the Super Bug is.

 

I think it is bigger, I’ve seen both together.

 

I remember the first ones I saw on the production line in St. Louis, I couldn’t believe how much bigger they were than our legacy Hornets.

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  • 1 month later...
1 hour ago, Collin said:

Are my eyes playing tricks on me.  Is that NMF (dulled) on the leading edge of the flaps on on the trailing edge of the wings?

 

180515-N-UV609-0316.JPG

They are painted grey, it's just the angle and lighting that makes them look NMF.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Great underside shot.  We don't often see the underside of aircraft, interesting the difference in weathering of engine and grime on the bottom but the relatively "clean" of the landing gear doors.

 

Cheers

Collin

 

180607-N-KL846-1154.JPG

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On 6/10/2018 at 6:39 AM, shion said:

DczCUSGVAAEhwln.jpg

 

May be interesting here, birth of weathering on an A-10C.

proof to your flight chief that you really did the post wash lube of the flight controls. !!! :-) 

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11 hours ago, shion said:

Could somebody explain the meaning of the chalk markings on the gun access door?

Weight and some other stuff so flight deck crew can make sure cat crew sets correct force to get the plane safely off the deck.

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27 minutes ago, Slartibartfast said:

Weight and some other stuff so flight deck crew can make sure cat crew sets correct force to get the plane safely off the deck.

 

12 hours ago, shion said:

150808-N-EH855-186.JPG

 

Could somebody explain the meaning of the chalk markings on the gun access door?

 

The writing on the gun access door is the chaff/flare load and the date it was certified/loaded. The G is the the initial for the armament specialist that loaded it.

 

This saves the aircrew from crawling under the jet on their pre-flight to confirm the load.

 

It isn't the catapult info.

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11 hours ago, Scooby said:

 

 

The writing on the gun access door is the chaff/flare load and the date it was certified/loaded. The G is the the initial for the armament specialist that loaded it.

 

This saves the aircrew from crawling under the jet on their pre-flight to confirm the load.

 

It isn't the catapult info.

Thank you.

 

I knew this, but I'd like to know the specific meaning of M/T S/B.

 

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Here is my take on the above pic Certified M/T as in Empty, S/B -Standard Ballast? - meaning someone verified the gun was not loaded with any ammo, don't know about the SH but on the CF-18 we used 20mm TP ammo as ballast. Here is another example:

 

171201-N-MJ135-2129.JPG

 

note the on door it indicates the number of rounds loaded and the type of rounds Semi-Armor Piercing High Explosive Incendiary  while to the right the chaff/flare load is indicated.

 

Jari

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