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mongo

White Paint That Doesn't Yellow

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I am planning a project that will require a large area to be painted white.  I have used several brands of oil-based enamel paint and all have yellowed over the years including Humbrol gloss white and Testors white (gloss and flat).  I have used the proprietary thinners for the paint when applying.  Can anyone suggest a paint brand that offers a white (gloss or flat) that doesn't yellow after a few years?  TIA.

 

Mongo

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You can use the Tamiya white primer or even decant from a spay can some white lacquer paint and use it through an air brush.  I haven't noticed either one of these getting yellow.

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Did you put a gloss clear coat over the white?

 

I have had Testors white go yellow, and I have had it stay white. I had a NASCAR model go yellow within months, but it was coated with testors gloss clear coat. I have a few other cars painted with testors "classic white" which are still nice and white years later.

 

I have another car model where I painted it a metallic blue, and also clear coated the chrome bumpers, the whole thing has a yellow tint So I am guessing the clear coat yellows over time.

 

Almost all my airplane models have white undercarriages and I use tamiya gloss white on detail parts like wheels and undercarriages, and they are still as white as ever. So maybe you can try Tamiya Acrylic?

 

good luck 

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I have used Humbrol flat white with Humbrol clear gloss and Testors dullcote over it. It's still white after 15+ years.

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I seem to  remember this topic being discussed and if the model was displayed where direct sunlight could reach it, it may also hasten the yellowing of the paint. 

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The Testors lacquer clear coats have a reputation for yellowing. I use Future for gloss coats and Acryl Flat. I haven't noticed any yellowing. YMMV...

 

Vern

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Exposure to UV light can effect white paint. gunze do a 'UV cut' clear lacquer that may help, I've not tried it though. another tip is to add a small amount of blue paint in with your white paint. Not sure of the science behind this but I believe it puts the white on the blue side of the spectrum as apposed to the yellow side which many white paints fall into, if that makes sense

Zak

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23 hours ago, zaktwist said:

Exposure to UV light can effect white paint. gunze do a 'UV cut' clear lacquer that may help, I've not tried it though. another tip is to add a small amount of blue paint in with your white paint. Not sure of the science behind this but I believe it puts the white on the blue side of the spectrum as apposed to the yellow side which many white paints fall into, if that makes sense

Zak

A friend of mine suggested using gray, but blue makes sense. It is the complimentary color of yellow and opposite it on the color wheel.

 

Vern

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I don't know if you only want to use lacquer or enamel paints, but AKAN's Radome/Radiotransparent White always stays bright white for me, even after several years pass. Priming it with Tamiya's white primer probably helps, too.

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Have you ever looked at the oil in a bottle of white enamel paint after it has separated after it sits for awhile.  The oil turns yellow.  Most white enamel paints will yellow over time.  I have had MM white enamel that yellows and then some that stays white.  It's a crap shoot.  I have switched to lacquer or acrylic for whites, and have had no issues.

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This question turns up many times. but the answer remains the same. Every modelling paint oil based will yellow some even after few days. Best to use is Tamiya white as that is Alcohol based and thinned with their own thinner. Prime the model with white primer or even white oil based paint. Working with tamiya isn't that easy but with patience you have the best possible white. Other thing is that Tamiya does react to masking tape and even after weeks of drying time it does leave marks in the paint.

 

 

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This is an interesting story, to me at least. I have an old Hasegawa F-4E I built in Israeli markings back in 1976 when I first got an airbrush. The underside is white, Testors I think. I guess I coated it with Testors Dull Coat after attaching the sparrow missiles. I didn't know back then to use a gloss coat. Anyway, the cat tried to eat it a few years ago and knocked off the landing gear and one of the sparrows.  I just noticed how yellow the white paint is, that is except for the area under the sparrow which is still as white as the driven snow. After 40 years! In my case it looks like it was the Dull Coat that yellowed. It has never been in sunlight.

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Don't use oil based paint (testors, revell, humbrol) . Acryilics are the way to go.  (Mr.Color, Gunze H, Tamiya). 

Also the clear coat should be acrylic. 

 

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All of the comments about the carriers in the paint are spot on. Take a look at a bottle of unshaken white acrylic paint and you'll see clear, un-yellow carrier.

 

For white, I initially coat with Tamiya Surface Primer, either from the square glass bottle or from the spray can. Both are excellent. They cover very well and are thin. If I am looking for a glossy finish, I spray Tamiya X-2 White over the base coat. Doesn't have to be thick; just enough to gloss the surface. In fact, I like to spray gloss colors a little on the thin side; the paint seems to level out nicely without filling in the details.

 

I always use Tamiya X-22 Clear Gloss for clear coats, but my initial try with Tamiya XF-86 Flat was not favorable. I will have to try again, but until then I will keep using Testors Acryl Flat, which resists my every attempt to screw it up..

Edited by andrew.deboer

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On 12/8/2016 at 1:03 PM, andrew.deboer said:

Tamiya XF-86 Flat was not favorable.

 

I think that's the one you add to a clear coat to flatten it. Is that what you did? If you use it straight it winds up looking like a salt spray. You wanna add about 10% to a clear coat for flattening.

hth

 

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No, I'm not talking about XF-21 Flat Base. XF-86 Flat Clear is a newish addition to the Tamiya line and is intended to be sprayed as is, as a flat coat. It is not the same as the much-maligned Flat Base.

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It is the gloss varnish which yellows in the absence of any paint pigment.  So here is your foolproof trick.  Flat white until you get good coverage (lacquer paint covers better..check Testors car range), then rub down the flat with 0000 steel wool to knock the roughness off (easy to get the hang of).  Gloss white (again, laquer is better...Tamiya TS spray cans are excellent, but you can use thinned out enamel), decals, thin coat of future to protect when weathering, then thin coat of lacquer gloss coat.  BTW, I have tried the flat white then clear gloss routine, and that does not seem to gloss up as easily as a thin coat of gloss paint.

 

You might also consider a drop of blue in your gloss paint.  I do that as well.

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I use all actual water based acrylics.

 

Primer with White Stynylrez water thinnable primer. I then cover with PollyScale RR Reefer White (I will until my supply runs out in a decade or so), then I use PolyScale water thinnable Clear coats. Alclad water based clear when that runs out.

 

Since I have had nothing but bad luck over the decades with any and all Enamel based whites and enamel or Lacquer paints and clearcoats yellowing,,,,,,I just plain eliminated them from the bench. I don't even trust Acrylic Lacquers or Acrylic Enamels. I will give Mr Paint a try, though, even though it is an Acrylic Lacquer. (I just don't use Mr Hobby or Tamiya,,,,,I am suspicious of their Lacquer carriers)

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7 hours ago, Rex said:

I use all actual water based acrylics.

 

 

 

Aaaack!    Enamel/Lacquer guy all the way here.  I know how they will behave better than my wife!

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Gil, I think we've had that discussion before. I also was once an "all Enamel guy"

 

But, I had to either switch to "non-fummy" Acrylics or quit. (Anne's allergies, not my own)

 

So, I had to find Acrylics that worked for me, and didn't have the Acrylic Enamel or Acrylic Lacquer "smell" to them. Just moving outside or into a shop  wouldn't work, since I have to stay within feet of Anne all of the time now.

 

(and for others, yes, yes, I know about the "particulates in the air with Acrylics" thing, I control that too,,,,,,so, that is not the part that makes Anne sicker)

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Got it...you do what you need to do.  Also, in all fairness, acrylics are getting very good, and excellent results are achievable if one takes the time to learn how to use them.

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