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F6F-5 Jasmine Models 1/48


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Don't think that this is a well known modelmaker, so this is what you get when you order this kit

a rather small box:
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which contains a bit of PE:
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a bit of resin:
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and I ordered some more goodies

a resin R-2800-W10 engine from Eduard
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and resin MG's from  Eduard:
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The F6F hellcat is a single engine fighterplane which served on aircraft carriers in the second world war and beyond. It was the successor of the F4F Wildcat (although the F6F was a complete new design, but it had a big resemblance with its predecessor, but was a lot bigger). In the beginning it was a competitor as a carrier based hunter with the F4U corsair, but the latter was mostly deployed from forward airbases due to some problems with carrier landings. From 1943 on it saw action in the Pacific, to counter the well known zero and other Japanese aircraft. Next to a heavier armament it had also self sealing fuel tanks and thanks to the radial engine it could also absorb a lot of damage. In total the type scored some 5223 kills, more than any other Marine aircraft during the war. After the war it stayed in service till 1954, mostly as a nightfighter.

 

The F6F-5 (or hellcat mkII) was an upgrade of the basic version with waterinjection in the engine for combat power, an geintegrated bulletproof windshield, reinforced tailplanes, new ailerons and a re-engineered cowling around the engine...

 

First blood will follow soon

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first progress...

 

I've started with the wings, just to get a feel how it assembles, and how it is to work with:

 

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As for now only a few pieces have been soldered, like the tip of the wing and the mountings for the MG's, which can still be removed. Now all the stringers on top of the wing need to be assembled.

I think I will need to make a combination of soldering and glueing, because soldering this material is not that easy...

 

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first progress...

 

I've started with the wings, just to get a feel how it assembles, and how it is to work with:

 

323794-11032-68.jpg

 

324050-11032-45.jpg

 

324051-11032-84.jpg

 

As for now only a few pieces have been soldered, like the tip of the wing and the mountings for the MG's, which can still be removed. Now all the stringers on top of the wing need to be assembled.

I think I will need to make a combination of soldering and glueing, because soldering this material is not that easy...

 

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Silenoz,

   I've seen a few PE skeleton builds in l believe 1/32 scale, and not only marveled at the complexity and detail, but how one can do this kind of construction with PE. Now your build in 1/48 scale which must be some what harder as soldering from what you've said doesn't always work well with those small parts. I'll be following along till completion.

 

Joel

 

 

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  • 2 years later...

First, I apologize for jumping in to a discussion of a form of model construction with which I am totally ignorant.  My purpose here is to give anyone not familiar with the hobby a heads up on what to expect. 

Having just started this model I am astonished at how difficult it is. Coming from a lifetime hobby of stick and tissue models, I was not ready for this!  First, they are incredibly tiny.  I started with the cockpit area, one of the most difficult it seems.  One demerit for ignorance.  I read mention of using solder in construction.  I just can't visualize this!.  How is it done?  The adhesive Bondic looked promising.  It is similar to dental adhesive, using UV light to cure.  Way too thick and messy.  

I'm using CA (super glue).  I started with gel and found it's too thick, tending to leave big globs of glue.  Just too thick.  After some experimentation I ended up using ZAP thin CA, applied with a 0.5 ml syringe.  They are available in bags of 40 for $15.  Each one is useable for several hours before the CA kicks off.  The tiny size and long needle allows placement of minute drops of CA exactly where needed.  This works well anywhere there is more than point contact at the joint.

"Third hands" are useful.  A pair of them are handy to position the parts being joined.  $8.50 on eBay. 

I would appreciate any helpful hints from those in the know, and any work-in-progress shots.

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Amazing detail they are putting on the photoetch -- and your work on the wing looks inspiring.

 

Too bad they don't have something like this but just pressed into a sheet of styrene so that normal glues would work. Something similar to what they do with balsa wood, but have a bit of texture added by compressing certain areas as it gets die-cut.

 

Still, looks pretty impressive as it is.

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I have entirely switched to Gator's Grip glue for photo etch assembly.  Thin it down with water to the point where you can apply it with a small pointy brush and it flows into the join by capillary action.  Dries quick,  and is strong with a limited flexibility.  Clean the brush with water often, and keep right on going.  I have found that it responds favorably to pressure such as clamping an instrument panel to the plastic kit part for a backing.  Love this stuff.

 

Rick L.

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  • 1 year later...

After about 20 hours I realize I'm just not good enough to finish this very challenging model.  If it weren't for the photo on the box I'd swear it can't be done.  I can't imagine the tooling it would take to hold these extremely delicate components in place at each joint, and getting in to apply the CA.  The "third hands" mentioned above are way too big and clumsy to help with the busier assemblies.  I gave up just aft of the cockpit.  The Gator's Grip looks promising.  I'll try it. 

I have most of what I have completed on display at our local library.  What's there is still very impressive to the casual observer.  I highly recommend this kit for someone with experience with tiny and complex PE models before, and possesses incredible amounts of patience.  If you don't have both the patience and the experience, don't attempt it.

QUESTION: has anyone in the group actually finished this build?  Comments on how?

IMGP1820A.JPG

IMGP1895A.JPG

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On 1/2/2021 at 3:36 AM, Newby said:

After about 20 hours I realize I'm just not good enough to finish this very challenging model.  If it weren't for the photo on the box I'd swear it can't be done.  I can't imagine the tooling it would take to hold these extremely delicate components in place at each joint, and getting in to apply the CA.  The "third hands" mentioned above are way too big and clumsy to help with the busier assemblies.  I gave up just aft of the cockpit.  The Gator's Grip looks promising.  I'll try it. 

I have most of what I have completed on display at our local library.  What's there is still very impressive to the casual observer.  I highly recommend this kit for someone with experience with tiny and complex PE models before, and possesses incredible amounts of patience.  If you don't have both the patience and the experience, don't attempt it.

QUESTION: has anyone in the group actually finished this build?  Comments on how?

IMGP1820A.JPG

IMGP1895A.JPG

 

Don’t quit!

 

Chris 

Edited by swimmer25k
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Did you build this? I'd love to see photos of the construction technique. How were the components held in place while attaching? What adhesive was used????

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9 minutes ago, Newby said:

Did you build this? I'd love to see photos of the construction technique. How were the components held in place while attaching? What adhesive was used????

I don’t have too many in progress pictures.  I soldered most of the parts together.  Much better and cleaner than using super glue. 

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