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Just wondering if the Harrier GR5's and the Jaguar GR3's use the BL755 cluster bomb or was it all "iron" bombs?

 

Thanks!

 

MattP

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They used the RBL-755 which had sensors between the body and fins (the tan items in the pic) so they could be dropped from higher altitudes since the regular BL-755 was a low altitude weapon:

 

rbl-755_138.jpg

 

Jari

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Thanks for the quick replys!!!

 

ALWAYS Appreciated!

 

MattP

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Finn-

 

Nice photo - thank you for sharing it!

 

Off-topic notes on the AIM-9 for those with serious ordnance AMS: The body is still white at this late date (think US stocks of white Sidewinders would have been gone by then), and the guidance section has the red-brown band on it. 

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US stocks of White sidewinders might have really been gone by then.

 

That is a British Harrier. (see fin flash)

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The brown band on the seeker head indicates low order explosive, inside is a small squib, of course not all Sidewinders have the brown band as some countries choose not to add it as it is a small charge. Low order explosives are things that burn rapidly, like rocket motors, rather than explode. You can see those same brown bands on the seeker heads of LGBs as well for the most part:

 

mfc-dual-mode-plus-photo-03-h-1024x542.j

 

Jari

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Yellow is normally the indicator of live rounds whether missiles or bombs, while blue are inert. 

The brown stripe indicates where the rocket engine and/or seaker/guidance kit is.  

http://www.twobobs.net/contents/en-us/p354.html 

 

In today's environment with JDAMs, the yellow stripe is often hidden under the JDAM kit installed on the bombs. 

 

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Yellow is for high explosives, things that go boom. You'll note in the pic of the RBL-755 it has a black band around the nose, just in front of the yellow one, the black indicates anti-armour.

 

Jari

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Posted (edited)

Isn't the brown band on the guidance section only found on European made sidewinders?  I believe it's there to mark the presence of the cooling gass for the seeker head. 

Edited by achterkirch

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The Winder in the photo has both Red-Brown bands, one at the front on the seeker head, and one just barely visible under the RBF, to mark the Low Explosive rocket motor.

 

 

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1 hour ago, achterkirch said:

Isn't the brown band on the guidance section only found on European made sidewinders?  I believe it's there to mark the presence of the cooling gass for the seeker head. 

 

The forward fins are driven by a gas generator, which is why the band is there on European manufactured missiles.  U.S. manufactured missiles don't have the brown band even though they use a gas generator too.

 

Regards,

Murph

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The squib fires up the gas generator, it's a small explosive charge thus the brown band. Some countries rules are more strict for markings.

 

Jari

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