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niart17

Representing Condensation On Clear Parts

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Posted (edited)

Hey all, I've been working on the Polar Lights First Officer Kane model and have come across a bit of a stumper. It goes against most modeling practices so I've never considered the best way to do this. I want to represent the condensation build up on the inside of Kane's clear face plate. It's a very distinct look in that you can actually see the individual droplets, some even running down at times. I think just scuffing it lightly will look wrong and any kind of clear coat I've tried on a test piece just looked like I got careless with paint or glue. it's mostly around the edges but a little in the center as well close to his breathing. Anyone ever successfully pull of this? Any and all ideas are welcome.

 

Here is a link to an image that gives a good idea of what I'm shooting for.

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Thanks,

Bill

Edited by niart17

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Might be risky, but I would try crazing the clear part by holding it over a puddle of CA glue where the CA can fume into the face plate (on the inside surface). I was thinking a puddle of CA on an old CD and two-three little supports around the puddle to keep the plate hovering above the puddle. If you have the sprue tree for that part, you can experiment with some test pieces first. I wouldn't completely enclose the puddle so that you have some control.

 

If things go wrong, you can sand, polish, restart. 

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Yikes! that does sound risky. I may give it a try on a scrap part but I don't know how you'd control which areas get crazed and which don't. Perhaps coat the middle section with some masking first? hmm......

 

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Maybe a very light sanding with fine grit paper...1000-1500? You could control the areas with that approach.

 

Bob

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How about Future, mixed with a bit of acrylic White paint. You have the control over the amount of opacity you want, plus, if it doesn't work, just dissolve it all in Windex.

Plus you may be able to depict the little drips with full strength Future applied with a fine point brush or toothpick or something.

 

But try it on some scrap first ...

 

 

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I like the idea of milky future. What would be ideal is if there were a way of causing something that would dry, like future,  to actually condense like steam. I remember as a kid playing with those little plastic bubble planters where you'd grow a bean plant inside. The moisture inside of those would be perfect, but it was just water. I can't imagine anything that would do that and harden at the right time with slight running streaks. I'm going to try all the above to see. Thanks guys.

 

Bill

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Coat the acrylic with Rain-X first, then Future with an additive.  But again, experiment first!  Just adding the Rain-X and lightly airbrushing straight Future might give you the look you are after.

Edited by Scott Smith

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Doh! I wish I'd read your post first Scott, I ended up using future, but I didn't think about using rain-x first, I think that would have gotten the streaking like I wanted. Oh well, I think this come out OK, not perfect, but it gives the illusion somewhat.

IMAG1568small.jpg

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