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F-15C Stabilator Question

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So I'm working on a highly modified/detailed Tamiya F-15C and I added rivets to the whole fuselage, wings, etc.  I have some photos of the Great Wall Hobby F-15C both the actual sprues and CAD images that show some images on the inboard section of the "saw tooth" section of the horizontal stabilators with rivet/screw detail (the part closest to the fuselage).  I have the Jake Melampy Eagle book that confirms this on the bottom of the stabilizer but no photos close up enough to tell from the upper surface.  I was hoping some former F-15C Eagle mechanics, crew chiefs, or pilots might be able to confirm or deny the presence of rivets or screws on this part?

 

Thanks

 

Dan

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IIRC the Horz Stabs on the Eagle were interchangeable, therefore the bottom could very well be the top you were looking at. I don't think there were any major differences from top to bottom, if there were it was very subtle. Hopefully someone will be able to confirm or educate us on the differences.

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Now that I can finally respond...that rivet pattern goes from the top of the leading edge and wraps to the bottom.  Fun fact...it’s the only part of the stab that’s made from aluminum & is hollow inside w/just the ribs.

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On 11/11/2017 at 7:41 AM, AlienFrogModeller said:

IIRC the Horz Stabs on the Eagle were interchangeable, therefore the bottom could very well be the top you were looking at. I don't think there were any major differences from top to bottom, if there were it was very subtle. Hopefully someone will be able to confirm or educate us on the differences.

 

True statement.

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Stabs are interchangeable from left to right, so top , bottom could be either. As to the rivets, you would have them on a repair stab not factory fresh. You will find 1” hi-torque screws in the torque box at the pivot point. Rivets , cherry max can be found on depot repairs of the stab especilly when the honey comb areas are found to be delaminating. Factory fresh jets are flush riveted covered with enough paint to make them unnoticeable, only repair areas of the aircraft depending on the TO would be cherry riveted but flush riveting is the norm.

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On 11/11/2017 at 7:41 AM, AlienFrogModeller said:

IIRC the Horz Stabs on the Eagle were interchangeable, 

 

Same for Hornets & Super Hornets? (that's a question)

 

I know they are also interchangeable on the Viper...

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3 hours ago, Ol Crew Dog said:
 
Stabs are interchangeable from left to right, so top , bottom could be either. As to the rivets, you would have them on a repair stab not factory fresh. You will find 1” hi-torque screws in the torque box at the pivot point. Rivets , cherry max can be found on depot repairs of the stab especilly when the honey comb areas are found to be delaminating. Factory fresh jets are flush riveted covered with enough paint to make them unnoticeable, only repair areas of the aircraft depending on the TO would be cherry riveted but flush riveting is the norm.

 

No more flush rivets.  Grid-Lock stabs now.  The honeycomb is no longer in use either.

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6 hours ago, habu2 said:

 

Same for Hornets & Super Hornets? (that's a question)

 

I know they are also interchangeable on the Viper...

Legacy Hornets, yes.I can't speak on behalf of SH. But it would be inline if they were interchangeable. 

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In the late 1980s the PACAF Public Affairs Office released a photo of an Okinawa based F-15 that showed the bottom of the aircraft. One of the stabilizers actually had the wing-walk markings on the bottom which was interesting to see once you figured out what was actually going on.  They are interchangeable as previously stated and not necessarily repainted immediately.

 Michael A.

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35 minutes ago, Michael A. said:

In the late 1980s the PACAF Public Affairs Office released a photo of an Okinawa based F-15 that showed the bottom of the aircraft. One of the stabilizers actually had the wing-walk markings on the bottom which was interesting to see once you figured out what was actually going on. 

 

Probably a 44 TFS jet.

 

Regards,

Murph

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13 hours ago, BoeingDriver said:

 

No more flush rivets.  Grid-Lock stabs now.  The honeycomb is no longer in use either.

 

I know before I retired the new Es came in with new composite speedbrake and gear doors. After being On the F-35 R&D and production program the tech is a bit archaic but still my 1st love! Gridlock that explains the sealant. 

Thanx

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For those of us that are among the uninitiated, could you please explain what "Gridlock" is? :dontknow:

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7 hours ago, Mstor said:

For those of us that are among the uninitiated, could you please explain what "Gridlock" is? :dontknow:

 

Lol.

 

  https://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/grid-lock-offers-safety-gain-on-ageing-f-15s-184857/

 

F-15's were notorious for having flight control surfaces start to come apart in flight because of the water entrapment within the honeycomb material.  Water would seep in from rain and condensation to become trapped in those surfaces (ailerons, flaps, rudders, speed brakes, and wingtips) freeze, melt, freeze and the cycle would repeat until structural failure.  The horizontal  stabs are divided into three sections; the forward and aft sections (honeycomb) and the center made from composites that would kill you if inhaled.  

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