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southwestforests

submarines lurking near underwater internet cables

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So, how do we know that; is it because our subs are going ye forth and doing likewise?

But my main question here is " lurking thousands of meters deep"
Thousands of meters?
Times 3.3 for how many thousands of feet?

 

{and are they colluding with Facebook?}

Quote

"Russian submarines are lurking near the underwater cables that power the internet
    April 2, 2018 
by Stephen Johnson

Russian submarines have been lurking thousands of meters deep in the North Atlantic near the communications cables that connect phone calls, texts, and internet service from North America to overseas nations.

 

The motive for the increased submarine activity is unclear, though it’s possible Russia is researching ways it could disrupt, destroy, or tap into the data lines in the future.

“We are now seeing Russian underwater activity in the vicinity of undersea cables that I don’t believe we have ever seen,” said U.S. Navy Rear Adm. Andrew Lennon, the commander of NATO’s submarine forces. “Russia is clearly taking an interest in NATO and NATO nations’ undersea infrastructure.”

"

http://bigthink.com/news/russian-submarines-are-lurking-near-the-underwater-cables-that-power-the-internet

Edited by southwestforests

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Sounds like kids hanging around outside a library trying to mooch free WiFi.  Sub full of Russians going ‘do think we can get signal on our phones if we hang around by these cables?’

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So like in aviation ,when a jet/aircraft flies over another country etc it has NO fly zone or had a restricted flight path ..

 

SO isn't that same  thing when vessels  used the high seas and oceans and even if they are underwater.

 

Thousands of meters.:hmmm:

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Ah, I'd forgotten about posting this topic.

 

Some more material,

 

https://www.popularmechanics.com/military/navy-ships/a22148/americas-underwater-hackers/

Quote

 

This sort of data collection, simply scooping up wireless networks or Internet traffic as it passes by, is a less intrusive form of spying. Instead of stealing a secret and making off with it, this is more akin to standing at the end of a river filled with information and taking notes as the information drifts downstream. It also makes noticing—and proving—data theft much more difficult.

Navy submarines have been doing something like this for decades. During World War II in the Pacific, submarines would act as listening posts at far-off islands, waiting for Japanese ships and planes to enter the area and begin broadcasting. During the 1960s and 70s, the United States Navy tapped undersea communications cables in the Sea of Okhotsk in the northwest Pacific. The nuclear submarine USS Halibut placed devices on cables that recorded Soviet military communications traffic, providing vital information to American intelligence analysts.

The Navy plans to extend the reach of its manned subs with the use of UUVs—so-called unmanned undersea vehicles. Smaller than manned navy submarines, UUVs will be able to get close to hostile shorelines, dive deeper, and act farther away than their manned mothership subs.

 

The UUV might explain the thousands of meters thing?

 

https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2013/07/the-creepy-long-standing-practice-of-undersea-cable-tapping/277855/

Quote

 

More than 550,000 miles of flexible undersea cables about the size of garden watering hoses carry all the world's emails, searches, and tweets. Together, they shoot the equivalent of several hundred Libraries of Congress worth of information back and forth every day.

In 2005, the Associated Press reported that a submarine called the USS Jimmy Carter had been repurposed to carry crews of technicians to the bottom of the sea so they could tap fiber optic lines. The easiest place to get into the cables is at the regeneration points -- spots where their signals are amplified and pushed forward on their long, circuitous journeys. "At these spots, the fiber optics can be more easily tapped, because they are no longer bundled together, rather laid out individually," Deutsche Welle reported.

 

 

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Wonder of someone has tried a diorama based on this concept? My health is a mess and I'm well beyond behind on things as is, therefore I will not.

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Maybe they're checking out the porn sites.

 

Regards,

Murph

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8 hours ago, Fubuki4 said:

Dealing with the russians is probably easier than dealing with comcast.

 

This has got to be the BEST comment made on this forum today!

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16 hours ago, Mr Matt Foley said:

 

This has got to be the BEST comment made on this forum today!

😀😀😀😀😀😀😀😀😀😀---John

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