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CD72091 - 1/72 B-47 Stratojet


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Yes, I don't remember any RATO takeoffs from Pease when I was a kid. But then, Pease had a 11,000 ft runway and tankers handy for heavyweight lift offs.  I do remember a belly landing where they foamed the runway during our kindergarten Field Trip. 

In the late sixties I remember the long black smoke trails from the B-52Ds and KC-135As.

Edited by Dutch
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I may have to pick up a second kit to build as a vanilla B-47E.  I see markings are included for 53-2134 "City of Lincoln" with the 307th BW.   My only kit right now has been prepped for conversion to a RB-47H.  I'll definitely need at least two sets of these decals.

Edited by Drifterdon
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I got to ride in a KC-135A taking off from Pease for a trip up to Arctic Canada and back to observe and study Aurora Borealis. The test flight originated at Hanscom Field in Mass. where the runway wasn't long enough for the tanker to take off with a full load of fuel. So we stopped to top off at Pease. Back then, I had a custom of timing aircraft takeoff runs from brakes off to lift off. With a full load of fuel and using water injection, the KC's takeoff run at Pease took a full 60 seconds! I was beginning to think I was going to meet a fiery fate in the overrun!

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13 hours ago, Paul Boyer said:

I got to ride in a KC-135A taking off from Pease for a trip up to Arctic Canada and back to observe and study Aurora Borealis. The test flight originated at Hanscom Field in Mass. where the runway wasn't long enough for the tanker to take off with a full load of fuel. So we stopped to top off at Pease. Back then, I had a custom of timing aircraft takeoff runs from brakes off to lift off. With a full load of fuel and using water injection, the KC's takeoff run at Pease took a full 60 seconds! I was beginning to think I was going to meet a fiery fate in the overrun!

And loud too!

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52 minutes ago, Dutch said:

And loud too!

Very loud!   The main gate at Eielson when I was there in the mid 80's was straight off the end of the runway.   Anytime Cobra Ball would take off from Eielson, there were always 2 or 3 water wagon KC's that would launch with her.   They would go straight over the top of you with those engines screaming.   It was always unnerving to see smoke belching from 3 of the 4 engines.   Made you wonder if they were going to make it off the runway.  I know part of my hearing loss has got to be from those things.

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On 8/7/2021 at 12:42 PM, Paul Boyer said:

Why three engines?

My understanding was if the water injection J-57 engined KC-135A's was working correctly they'd belch smoke from the exhaust.   The gate at Eielson was named Hursey Gate in honor of Amn Hursey who lost his life in 1963 when a KC-135 lost an engine on takeoff and failed to get airborne.   It crashed off the end of the runway taking out the gate along with Amn Hursey in it.   I was always concerned that a tanker belching smoke out of only 3 engines had lost it's 4th and was about to take out the gate again.  Me with it.

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  • 1 month later...

Hi,

 

With the 1/144 sheet being on the horizon as well, I bought a new Academy B-47. This boxing carries serial 12618 and is titled "306th BW(M)".

To my surprise, there is an extra sprue in there with parts for an RB-47H.

Do any of our RB-47 specialists have an Academy kit with these parts? I'm curious about what they think about these parts.

In particular, I'm wondering about the nose. In my mind, the RB-47 had a longer and more bulbous nose. The Academy RB-47 part is more bulbous, but hardly any longer (I think, not having cut them from the sprue yet). 

 

Cheers, Stefan.

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The RB-47E had the longer nose. I’m not home right now to look at my H kit. But I think the Academy H nose could use a little more length if that’s what you are asking. 
 

Rick L. 

Edited by Spruemeister
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7 hours ago, Spruemeister said:

The RB-47E had the longer nose. I’m not home right now to look at my H kit. But I think the Academy H nose could use a little more length if that’s what you are asking. 
 

Rick L. 

 

Thanks, Rick.

 

Yes, that was what I was asking.

Having had another look at RB-47H pictures (but still not having cut the part from the sprue), I do think it could use a bit more length.

 

Cheers, Stefan.

 

 

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  • 1 month later...

All the components are ready and I am working on the last few profiles before wrapping up the instructions and enabling preorders. I am very happy with how this complex project turned out, and I am sure anyone interested in the B-47 will like it.  A reprint of this complicated, multi-sheet set is not likely, so if you are interested please don't miss it when it is released.

 

With this one out of the way, I am going to shift my attention to the equally ambitious P-3, F-22  and B-52 projects coming in the next few months - stay tuned.

 

b47d1.jpg

 

b47d2.jpg

 

b47d3.jpg

 

b47d4.jpg

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On 8/6/2021 at 10:21 PM, Paul Boyer said:

I got to ride in a KC-135A taking off from Pease for a trip up to Arctic Canada and back to observe and study Aurora Borealis. The test flight originated at Hanscom Field in Mass. where the runway wasn't long enough for the tanker to take off with a full load of fuel. So we stopped to top off at Pease. Back then, I had a custom of timing aircraft takeoff runs from brakes off to lift off. With a full load of fuel and using water injection, the KC's takeoff run at Pease took a full 60 seconds! I was beginning to think I was going to meet a fiery fate in the overrun!


My dad (E9, USAF) told a very similar story.

 

From ‘65 to ‘69 he was on the Strategic Air Command Maintenance Standardization Evaluation Team out of Offutt.  They were flying from Torrejon one August in a KC-135 back to Nebraska.  Dad had hundreds of hours in KC-135s as a passenger, not crew.  He knew how long a normal roll was until airborne.  The jet was loaded with fuel, very heavy and it was August in Spain. 
 

This time it was not getting off the ground.  There’s few windows in a KC-135 fuselage and the seats near the windows were occupied by brass.  Anyway, the jet was not getting into the air.  What really got my dad’s attention were the officers by the windows, there were pointing out the windows and looking at each other with great concern.  Since they were pilots, they knew better than my dad this roll was taking way, way, way too long.  
 

Finally, the nose lifted a bit and they were airborne.  But not by much.  To dad, again not a pilot but accustomed to the noises and routine of the KC-135, it seemed like they raised the gear about ten feet off the ground.  (Minimize drag?) Slowly, slowly they gained altitude.  At some point one of the brass had enough and headed to the cockpit to see what “help” he could provide the 26 year old Captain to gain altitude.  I am sure it was most appreciated.

 

After they burned off a lot of fuel and got over the cold Atlantic they started getting up to cruising altitude, but a heavy plane plus a hot day in Spain caused some excitement for sure.

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