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11bee

Forgotten War Mustang - F-51D in Korea

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Very nice work. The IP looks good. I do agree with you that a bit of weathering on the IP would help blend it in. 

 

Side note, Barracuda decals showed up today. Even in 1/32, I need better eyes for these!

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15 hours ago, Brett M said:

Very nice work. The IP looks good. I do agree with you that a bit of weathering on the IP would help blend it in. 

 

Side note, Barracuda decals showed up today. Even in 1/32, I need better eyes for these!

Thanks Brett!   Good luck on those decals, if a klutz like me can apply them, anyone can.  The key is a set of locking needlenose tweezers and Micro Sol/Set.   That's it.

 

They really add a great deal to a kit.  Here's the cockpit of my recent F4U-1D Corsair:

44694793751_0eb9ff9d59_b.jpg

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On to other areas.  Still have a few minor bits to add to the cockpit but I'll get to them later.  Next up are the radios behind the cockpit.   First off - a really fun tutorial on Mustang radios!

 

As with the cockpit itself, the area aft of the cockpit evolved quite a bit over time.   Originally, the first D-model Mustangs had nothing more than a big, bulky SCR-522 radio.  Aft of this radio was the aircraft's battery.    Here's a good illustration of the early layout:

FSX P-51D SCR-522 Radio and Rear Battery Installation (WWII Standard)

 

Late in WW2, the USAAF added the SCR-695 IFF set.  This was the first IFF equipment installed in a fighter-sized aircraft.  This configuration carried over into Korea.  

FSX P-51D SCR-522 and SCR-695 Radio Installation (Very Late WWII and Post-WWII)

To make way for the IFF set, the battery was relocated into the engine compartment.   Sharp-eyed observers will note this configuration by the presence of a small battery cooling scoop on the port fuselage, slightly above and ahead of the wing root leading edge.    Tamiya provides parts for both of these configurations (and yes, they have the cooling scoop included).  The aircraft I'm modeling (Little Beast) appears to be in this configuration.  However, since many WW2-stock Mustangs had their radios upgraded in-theater, I'm going with the addition of a BC-453 receiver unit which was mounted above the original SCR-522.  I'm going to have to scratchbuild this radio and it's mount.  We'll see how it goes.  If it turns out poorly, I'll keep Little Beast in her earlier configuration.   

 

Here's what the BC-453 installation looked like:

FSX P-51D/F-51D BC-453-B, SCR-522, and SCR-695 Radio Installation (Post-WWII)

 

Finally, late in the Korean War, the Mustang's last radio upgrade, using the ARC-3 system was introduced.  This replaced the SCR-522 completely.  

FSX P-51D/F-51D ARC-3 and SCR-695 Radio Installation (Post-WWII)

Sure would be nice if someone would offer all these radio sets in resin but I'm not going to hold my breath.   Maybe if Tamiya ever releases an F-51D (and the way the kit is laid out, it appears that at one point, they intended to), Big T will take care of this issue.    As my luck goes, they will announce their brand new F-51D on the same day I complete my build. 

 

Anyway, that's it for my tutorial.  Pretty exciting stuff, right?  Hope you guys all enjoyed it!   i'll be back with a quick modeling update a bit later.

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