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Pappy121

Mustang propeller question

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G'day people,

 

I have a newbie question regarding the yellow painted portion of the propeller tips of P-51 Mustangs.

 

Was there a standard distance for this yellow portion, i.e. 2" for example?

 

cheers,

 

Pappy

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4 hours ago, seawinder said:

For USAAF and British planes, the standard tip stripe width was 4 inches.

Wow, really?  I have no data at all to dispute your 4 inch answer to the question, but I’ve been eyeballing the yellow ends on the Brit/US propellers on my 1/48 models and I been making them significantly larger than this, as making them to scale would be almost nothing there.  4 inches in 1/48 is about 11/128” , or just a bit over 1/16”.  Seems a very small amount of yellow.  Of course, that’s just me 😊

Edited by Curt B

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Thanks for the photo...will need to do my in-progress Mustang with these smaller than anticipated yellow tips.  Thanks. 

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Not on topic but, interesting picture, flaps up and gear doors up.  Not what you always heard about the hydraulics loosing pressure and then they droop.

 

Geoff M

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1 hour ago, Curt B said:

Wow, really?  I have no data at all to dispute your 4 inch answer to the question, but I’ve been eyeballing the yellow ends on the Brit/US propellers on my 1/48 models and I been making them significantly larger than this, as making them to scale would be almost nothing there.  4 inches in 1/48 is about 11/128” , or just a bit over 1/16”.  Seems a very small amount of yellow.  Of course, that’s just me 😊

4 inches in 1/48 is 1/12", which works out to about 1.33333/16" (1-and-1/3 sixteenths to put it accurately but awkwardly), which is actually a fairly healthy bit over 1/16".

 

Not to denigrate your modeling skills, but I'd venture to say that many folks tend to make the tip stripes wider than they should be. I know I always feel as though they're going to be too narrow, but once they're painted, they look right to me.

 

Cheers, Pip

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Well, glad I got the real scoop before I get to the Mustang.  And definitely something to keep in mind going forward with any/all US/Brit WWII era planes.

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Thanks very much Seawinder and everyone else who contributed, 4 scale inches it is.

 

I have been wading through several fora discussions on the subject of wheel well colours and door positions. It is a minefield with lots of contradictory opinions and evidence.

 

My take on it is that the inner oors would normally be closed immediately after engine shut down as they only opened as the gear was cycled. Once the engine was shut down (and the engine driven hydraulic pump was no longer supplying pressure to the system), these doors would sag open, however the rate was dependent uponthe serviceability of the hyd system, so this may have been rapid or slow, but eventually they would sag. Of course, maintenance crews could also manually unlock the doors and open them for inspections and maintenance as well, so the answer is anything between fully up and fully open would be correct, but it would be typical for them to be closed immediately after shut down.

 

Most people show them open as:

  • They wish to show off the kit details
  • They don't have to bother with getting the doors to fit
  •  The kit parts are engineered that way and perhaps the modeller doesn't know any different

Now each modeller is entitled to build their kit how they want. There is also the issue of the wing panel lines being evident on most kits instead of being filled and doped which iwas normal (there are obvoiusly exceptions but this is how they came from the factory) but also ignorred by many modellers, personally I think this is  greater innacuracy but again, each person has the right to build as they choose, but if they cite accuracy as a driver, then that is a criteria that should also be considered,

 

cheers,

 

Pappy

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Notice the inner gear doors in the above photos aren't in consistent positions?

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On 12/12/2019 at 9:53 PM, Curt B said:

Wow, really?  I have no data at all to dispute your 4 inch answer to the question,

 

According T.O. No 07-1-1 camouflage aircraft, markings & insignia, the camouflaged propeller is painted in black

except 4 inches of the tip of the blade will be yellow lacquer, shade No48....

From 1947, yellow tip will be 6 inches for propeller bigger than 15 feet diameter.

689611776_P51Yellowbladetip.jpg.6b108255a6ed8bc862477de71eb2017f.jpg

 

 

NAA Specifications P51, section Finish color scheme for fighter airplanes/exterior surfaces/propeller blade tip :

"identification yellow enamel from tip to 4 inches from the tip."

1715439330_P51Yellowpropbladetip.thumb.jpg.cd479e8f3bc19096058189f6ab862ebd.jpg

HTH

 

Waroff

Edited by Sowar

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Thanks for posting the requirements for the yellow tip details!

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On 12/12/2019 at 1:55 PM, Antonio Argudo said:

no problem mate, here some more, cheers

74178665-2091006091044886-88675782603141

FRE-005981.jpg

P-51-D-Mustang-Bush-OCW-2-Farb-2.jpg

1794633-10150403881559969-743161339-n.jp

14753757-1256146244458286-87441752604891

 

 Great photos of propellers!  Thanks for posting.  This confirms the concept that the front surfaces of props are generally in good shape, that is, not much wear/damage to the finish.  I've been making my props, since I learned (recognized) the obvious concept (once you think about it) that the rear surfaces of propellors are the driving part of the prop, with pretty much pristine front surfaces and the rear being more 'beaten', dirty/chipped.  

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The front part of the blade does the driving.  It is, after all, an air foil.  The rear gets beat up due to angle of attack; the leading edge and back side are exposed to any air-borne debris.

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On 12/16/2019 at 12:20 PM, Slartibartfast said:

The front part of the blade does the driving.  It is, after all, an air foil.  The rear gets beat up due to angle of attack; the leading edge and back side are exposed to any air-borne debris.

 

Well said...that’s what I meant, I just didn’t say it anywhere near as well as you!!

Edited by Curt B

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On 12/12/2019 at 10:51 PM, Geoff M said:

Not on topic but, interesting picture, flaps up and gear doors up.  Not what you always heard about the hydraulics loosing pressure and then they droop.

 

Geoff M

On the ground,

On B & C models, the doors are mechanically locked in up position when ldg is down. The weight on LDG strut lock the ldg handle in down position.


On D model, the door are maintained closed by the hydraulic pressure. After engine shut down, to lock the ldg handle in down position, the pilot pull the emergency ldg handle, this action release the pressure and the doors could opened by their own weight

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