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RedHeadKevin

Joining bomb halves (front to back)

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I'm building some Eduard Brassin resin cluster bombs. They come with the bomb section as one part, and the tail fins as another. You have to cut them off a mounting block, and sand down the nub. If the ends are off-straight by a even a tiny amount, it never looks straight. I'm looking for any good tips for joining these halves, and keeping everything straight.

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How about some 5 minute epoxy? Its thickness could allow you sufficient ability to align the parts while drying quickly enough to manage.

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I believe Zactoman had a killer trick for this sort of problem. Something with drilling shallow holes into the parts. That way you end up with rings instead of solid circles for mating surfaces. Much easier to level out and glue.

 

EDIT: Here's where I saw it. LINK! Not quite as I remembered it, but maybe helpful nonetheless.

Edited by ChernayaAkula

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Zactoman's method is close to what I ended up doing. I drilled out both parts, so any sanding would have to be done to a thin ring, rather than trying to keep the whole end flat.

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16 hours ago, ChernayaAkula said:

I believe Zactoman had a killer trick for this sort of problem. Something with drilling shallow holes into the parts. That way you end up with rings instead of solid circles for mating surfaces. Much easier to level out and glue.

 

EDIT: Here's where I saw it. LINK! Not quite as I remembered it, but maybe helpful nonetheless.

Ooh, I like that! I hope I can remember it when needed!!!

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I take a sanding file (usually new as it will be less likely to have warps) and lay it flat on as straight a surface as possible.  Place the end to be sanded on the flat file and gently run it the length of the sanding surface.  If you use gentle, even pressure you can get it dialed in  pretty straight.  

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A sheet of glass usually provides a fine warp-free flat surface. A sheet of abrasive paper, grit-side up on said glass, is great for truing parts.

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8 minutes ago, dnl42 said:

A sheet of glass usually provides a fine warp-free flat surface. A sheet of abrasive paper, grit-side up on said glass, is great for truing parts.

👍

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