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Historybuff

Best non toxic dull coats

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Has anyone come across a great non toxic dull coat? If you haven’t come across my previous post, I have some birds that can’t be around any toxic fumes. I’m wanting to protect my model when complete but also hide some of the gloss coat I had to spot coat on my flat acrylic paints to allow the decal a smooth surface to stick on. I would prefer a dull coat that I could either thin with water or not at all. Also would prefer it to be able to be brushed on. Although I probably could run down and get a cheap so called air brush that uses a disposable canister as the propellant. Although I’m not too confident in airbrushing. Plus, it would need to be done outside. Any help anyone can provide me would be great.

 

btw, I have some parts that will need to remain glossy. So I would have to mask some of that acrylic paint with model masking tape. Note that I didn’t prime the surface of my model. Will the masking tape for models peel my paint off even if that part I mask has some sort of gloss coat over it to protect it? 
 

sorry for all the questions. I’m learning as I go on this. First model of mine that requires painting and water slide decals. 

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I like Microscale Industries Micro Flat and Micro Satin products. Brush on directly or thin with water to airbrush (this is what I do). My current sig has models using this stuff.

 

HTH

-- 

dnl

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@dnl42, Have you applied this with a brush before? As I googled the product, it said to “apply like you would lacquer and feather lightly.” Any idea as to what it means? If not, I may just have to experiment with it. 
 

also, just to double check, this is non toxic?

 

Appreciate the information so far. 

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I haven't brushed it. I believe feather means to apply lightly and build the coat out from the starting point, applying to a still wet edge. 

 

I use it a lot and it has a very very low odor. If you want an authoritative statement on the product, you'll have to contact Microscale Industries.

 

I see you asked about masking. Paint's robustness depends on many factors. While I always prime, I also make sure the model surface is clean. I always wash my hands thoroughly before working on the model, and wash bare ready-to-paint surfaces with IPA before applying the first coat, which for me is a primer. I only use Tamiya paper masking tape (yellow) and vinyl tape (white), so they're low-tack right out of the bag. I then de-tack the tape by first laying it on my cutting map before I cut it, and then applying the pre-cut tape to the clean palm of my hand before I finally apply the tape to the model. Finally I use primarily use Gunze Mr Color paint, a lacquer, which is completely out of the non-toxic wheelhouse, but it's very robust!

 

Finally, NEVER, EVER, apply any tape atop decals. Period. Ever. Even if there's a clear coat atop the decal. When I need to mask around decals, I use Parafilm "M", plain paper, or Post-It Notes (still avoiding putting the adhesive atop a decal).

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Yeah, I don’t plan on putting any masking tape near decals. Just to try and cover the painted spots that are supposed to be glossy. Worried about accidentally raising the paint with my masking tape. I may just try to be extra careful if I apply it by brush. 
 

I do use Microscale Set/Sol. Never thought about their coats. 
 

one last question, if you don’t mind. Did it dry flat or no? I heard some reviews saying it was great, some saying too glossy. If it’s actually flat from your experience, I’ll probably buy it. I just want to make sure it does its job as my primary reason for getting it is to make it flat, then protect. 

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My experience is it's the flattest clear coat. Click on the LCM3 in my current sig to check  the final photos and judge for yourself.

 

I also like the satin, which are the C-47, XF5F, and AT-6.

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Oh, nice! I love the LCM3, btw. Awesome models you built there. I’m going to go with your advice and try the Microscale Flat. Thank you for the time and advice! 

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Posted (edited)

Non-toxic is a bit vague in the world unfortunately.  Ultimately, the real question is at what exposure/dose it's toxic and what the effects are.  I'm fortunate to have a built in spray booth with outside vent combined with a chemical respirator.  So while most of my painting is with acrylic, I'm a bit more lenient on fumes. 

 

The draw back I normally see with bad flat coats are a "frosty" appearance.  This is usually most noticeable with dark grays and blacks, making everything look a bit milky.  Model Master Acryl in my experience is an example.  It does depend on how thick you put it on, but I found a fairly narrow margin of error..

 

Additionally, yellowing or very thick paints can be a problem. 

 

So with that said, the two flat coats I'm sold on are Tamiya XF-86 and Alclad Klear Flat. 

 

Tamiya XF-86 could qualify as non-toxic.  It's technically is an "acrylic lacquer", meaning it's solvent is water soluble, but not water.  Typically a mix of alcohols.  Ideally, you'd breath in nothing.  But of all things out there, alcohols are usually pretty mild on the toxicity level (except at 21st birthday parties and weddings...).  With that said, I get best results thinning it with Mr. Color Leveling Thinner, which negates the safety, but regular isopropanol works rather well if desired.

 

Alclad Klear Flat is a full solvent based lacquer, so while it's my absolute favorite, won't count for non-toxic.  I would use this one all the time, except it is slight susceptible to wear from white spirits and turpentines for oil weathering.  So Tamiya XF-86 becomes my post-decal flat, with the Alclad the final flat. 

 

I find both of these to be very clear in the "haze" department, and have no problems with overly thick coats or yellowing.

Edited by ESzczesniak

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Ditto on Tamiya XF-86, Clear Flat. Do not get Tamiya Flat Base which is to be mixed with glossy paint to flatten them. Isopropyl will thin it if needed, or you could use Tamiya’s own thinner XF-20A. I apply with an airbrush but it could be brushed if desired

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awesome! Thank you guys for the advice on the Tamiya XF-86. I’ll give that a go if the Microscale Flat I ordered is not to my liking.

 

i also hear you on the vague term of “non-toxic”. I found that out after a lot of research before getting my bird. Basically, I just need something as least toxic as possible and will give off little to no fumes. Unfortunately, I know that can limit my options quite a bit. I appreciate the help on trying to come up with an answer with something with a very limited amount of solutions. 

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Posted (edited)

My recommendation for a non-toxic flat is the AK Interactive Ultra Matte Varnish.  Despite its tile of 'varnish', it is water based, can clean up and thin with water, and there is no (absolutely none!) smell/odor.  In my experience, it creates a dead flat surface, even over gloss paint.  It may take 2 coats to be fully effective.  I've both airbrushed and brush painted the stuff, and it is equally effective in both cases.  The only down side is that recently, I've found that almost all of our on-line hobby supply stores have this on backorder.  This was before the virus scare, so I'm not sure why supplies have not kept up with apparent demand.  But, regardless, this is the stuff I would absolutely recommend!  

Edited by Curt B

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My preferred clearcoat (really the only one I use) is Testors acryl,  which is thinned with water.  It does have a "paint" odor, but not more than Tamiya.

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Thank you all for the suggestions. I appreciate all the recommendations. I have more options to fall back on than I thought would. 

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Posted (edited)
On 4/10/2020 at 5:20 PM, dnl42 said:

Brush on directly or thin with water to airbrush (this is what I do).

@dnl42, I have a question about airbrushing the Microscale Industry’s Micro Flat with an air brush. In case I ever decided to airbrush outside the house in the case of me not liking how it looks brushed on, how much do you dilute it with water? Also, at what psi do you spray it with personally?

 

I’m asking about this because I have been looking into outdoor spray booths. I may eventually go that route. 

Edited by Historybuff

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On 4/15/2020 at 2:04 AM, Camus272 said:

My preferred clearcoat (really the only one I use) is Testors acryl,  which is thinned with water.

@Camus272, I happen to have Testors gloss clear coat. I’m wondering if you use that. If you, do, do you apply it with an airbrush or paintbrush? How much do you thin with water for either airbrush or paintbrush? PSI level if you do airbrush it?

 

Sorry for all the questions. I’ve just been liking some airbrushing I’ve been watching. So I may end up airbrushing outside my home for things like clear coats. I hear a lot of conflicting opinions on how to do what I asked you. So I would prefer to ask you on this forum if you have already done it successfully rather than wade through all these conflicting opinions on the internet. 

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Posted (edited)

I thin any airbrushing medium to the thickness of 1% milk. Look at the atomization to ensure it is fine and uniform. I also make sure the medium lays down on the surface smoothly. It's always important to watch the paint as it hits the surface to ensure it's slightly wet. It must not be dry. It must not be runny. 

 

My airbrushing station is in my garage, near the door, which I always open.

 

HTH

-- 

dnl

Edited by dnl42

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@dnl42, I got ya. I guess I’ll just have to get it as close to the consistency as possible, and then experiment with PSI and needle size to try to achieve the desired result you’re describing when spraying. I appreciate the info. This will serve me well when I do get what need to get into airbrushing clear coats. 

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