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Rotorman

H 43 Huskie/ H. 34 Choctaw Flight Line

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Kaman made the first composite rotor blade for Bell Cobras?  Yes it is a treasure trove of Kaman aviation

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Posted (edited)

105337593_10219564321591178_353271636581104848823_10219563923341222_106713258120

 

105561043_10219563923861235_464588834558

 

105950193_10219563923741232_246177730182

Edited by Bounce

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4 hours ago, Loach Driver said:

Amazing source of info. Feb 67 has a schematic of the auxiliary fuel tanks! Might be of interest?

 

LD.

A lot of great photos. I will be adding the fuel tanks in the cabin for sure. thanks

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I thought it might be something that would be of interest for your model!

 

LD.

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Loach Driver said:

I thought it might be something that would be of interest for your model!

 

LD.

working on the tanks as we speak and started painting the cabin, cockpit and the long exhaust pipe. Please keep the pictures coming.

Edited by Rotorman

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Posted (edited)

The Kaman Rotor Tips article above has a story on John Slattery, helicopter model collector extraordinaire.

In the mid- '60s, I was a kid and saw an article about an AF officer who collected helicopter models in a magazine (likely the USAF monthly, Airman).

Fast forward 30 years to 1996 and I'm a Air Force major in the D.C. Area.

 

Somehow (remember this is the pre-internet days) I become aware of the helicopter model collection held by the Helicopter Association International trade group in Washington.

I make an appt to see it and meet Slattery, the group's historian. I'm amazed by the collection of hundreds of built kits and factory models. I tell him I recall a magazine story I read when I was a kid about an AF officer who collected models... "That was me",  he said.

Small world.

 

In addition to his collection, the group had just bought a huge unbuilt kit collection amassed by Ned Gilliand, a long time Bell test pilot, historian and author of Dancing Rotors Rotors the story the U.S. Army's helicopter display teams.

 

Ned had collected hundreds of kits from around the world. There was an example of two of every helicopter kit ever made. It includes ancient kits I'd heard of but never seen, and some rare ones like the "G Mark" brass/ Plastic Bell 47 kit.

 

I believe you can see the built model collection on the HAI's website.

 

A couple of years later, I was transferred to Texas and got to meet Ned, a great guy. He took me to the factory to see some test flying. He sold me some neat Bell factory models and provided a lot of factory literature on Bell types. He even sold me, at a nominal price, an unused example of the Whirlybirds TV series coloring book from the '50s (which I had as a kid).

Edited by JohnEB

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6 hours ago, JohnEB said:

The Kaman Rotor Tips article above has a story on John Slattery, helicopter model collector extraordinaire.

In the mid- '60s, I was a kid and saw an article about an AF officer who collected helicopter models in a magazine (likely the USAF monthly, Airman).

Fast forward 30 years to 1996 and I'm a Air Force major in the D.C. Area.

 

Somehow (remember this is the pre-internet days) I become aware of the helicopter model collection held by the Helicopter Association International trade group in Washington.

I make an appt to see it and meet Slattery, the group's historian. I'm amazed by the collection of hundreds of built kits and factory models. I tell him I recall a magazine story I read when I was a kid about an AF officer who collected models... "That was me",  he said.

Small world.

 

In addition to his collection, the group had just bought a huge unbuilt kit collection amassed by Ned Gilliand, a long time Bell test pilot, historian and author of Dancing Rotors Rotors the story the U.S. Army's helicopter display teams.

 

Ned had collected hundreds of kits from around the world. There was an example of two of every helicopter kit ever made. It includes ancient kits I'd heard of but never seen, and some rare ones like the "G Mark" brass/ Plastic Bell 47 kit.

 

I believe you can see the built model collection on the HAI's website.

 

A couple of years later, I was transferred to Texas and got to meet Ned, a great guy. He took me to the factory to see some test flying. He sold me some neat Bell factory models and provided a lot of factory literature on Bell types. He even sold me, at a nominal price, an unused example of the Whirlybirds TV series coloring book from the '50s (which I had as a kid).

????

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Posted (edited)
14 hours ago, Rotorman said:

????

 Huh???

I thought I made myself pretty clear.

Can you see Bounce's post from yesterday?

If so, look at the top of the page from Rotor Tips, there is an interesting piece about a helicopter model collection.

 

Edited by JohnEB

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9 hours ago, Rotorman said:

????

John is simply saying he met the man mentioned in the above article.

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Posted (edited)

LECTRICLECTURE-KAC Instructor Robert Krans explains HU2K-1 electrical system to R. E. Mikesell, AEC; M. E. Richards, AE2;V. F. Knight, AEC;D. G. Beasley,AT2; R. R. Porter,ATN3; and H. E- Pasch,AEMAN.

Sept 1960 page6 Rotor Tips

 

This is my Dad. He was one of the first employees. Was a blade technician, advancing up through the company.

Edited by jager

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12 hours ago, Rotorman said:

really, thats sounds sarcastic. Sorry bro, i am not in the humor mode, too many people dying around me lately. 

No sarcasm intended. The link was to the history of Ovation Guitars. Ovation Guitars was a company that Charles Kaman started and was involved in the design and manufacture of a fine instrument. 

I had no knowledge of your personal losses but I extend my condolences to you for them.

Jager

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21 hours ago, Rotorman said:

really, thats sounds sarcastic. Sorry bro, i am not in the humor mode, too many people dying around me lately. 

Sorry about that,  but in all honesty I dont see any sarcasm there.

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