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painting engine exhaust nozzles


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This will be the first time Im going all out detailing exhaust nozzles, and the lucky winner is the F101-GE-102   for the B-1B in 1:48. Im looking for the proper staining techniques and paints I will need to pull it off. Any decent tutes out there that detail exactly how one would paint these? Been looking for a few days and havent found much of anything.

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that doesnt really tell me anything. Ive looked on youtube for aircraft engine nozzle painting techniques, and Im more interested in seeing step by steps from people who have their own techniques: the kind of paint they use, the colors, shading techniques, whether or not they use airbrush or paint brushes. You know, individual tastes that I can experiment with and test out various methods, not a book I need to buy.

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Doesn't tell you anything?  I'll tell you something.  No one is going to hold your hand and walk you through painting nozzles.  It doesn't work that way.  Guys here, including myself,  have spent years or decades of trial and error, practice and mistake after mistake.  I had to research, buy supplies, read these forums over and over trying to learn.  Now, I take time and send you to 2 very good sources that can give you great techniques and you say that's not what you want.  Tell you what..go do it yourself. Your lazy and looking for a short cut.   You know why I'm the only one that responded?  You asked a stupid question and your wasting everyone's time.  

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The paints I used are the AK xtream for metal effects. They’re pre thinned ready for the airbrush, heaps of different shades, and you can mix the different paints to get a ‘custom’ shade if required. To dirty it up Tamiya pastels, very easy to apply, if it’s over done, wash it off with water and go again, but it’s easy built up slowly. I hope this helps!

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39 minutes ago, myuziweighsaton said:

Doesn't tell you anything?  I'll tell you something.  No one is going to hold your hand and walk you through painting nozzles.  It doesn't work that way.  Guys here, including myself,  have spent years or decades of trial and error, practice and mistake after mistake.  I had to research, buy supplies, read these forums over and over trying to learn.  Now, I take time and send you to 2 very good sources that can give you great techniques and you say that's not what you want.  Tell you what..go do it yourself. Your lazy and looking for a short cut.   You know why I'm the only one that responded?  You asked a stupid question and your wasting everyone's time.  

Nobody is asking for you to hold my hand, and the best advice you give is to do it yourself plus go buy some books. Go off on your own tirade somewhere else, and if you have advice for other people, keep it to yourself. Thats my advice to you.

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14 minutes ago, Squizzy Taylor said:

The paints I used are the AK xtream for metal effects. They’re pre thinned ready for the airbrush, heaps of different shades, and you can mix the different paints to get a ‘custom’ shade if required. To dirty it up Tamiya pastels, very easy to apply, if it’s over done, wash it off with water and go again, but it’s easy built up slowly. I hope this helps!

The exhaust sleeves Im looking to paint were once steel, but they've been scorched to a rusty color like this. Also the interior of the nozzles have these various colors on the petals; I work on 747 exhaust sleeves, I can scotch brite that to its original color...almost...but what would I do to weather them? Not looking to blue them as I dont see any evidence of that around here, and if I use a metallizer it will just come out shiny and these arent shiny at all. IRL they are about as coarse as 200 grit sandpaper. How would one get that kind of texture on paint?

8172.jpg

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Sorry, metal colours for the outside, and for me, I’d start with a white colour inside, very similar to a F-16 GE exhaust, and build the colours up slowly to what you see in the photo using pastels. The tamiya pastel sets come in colours to simulate grime, rust and colour distortion from heat, just use a short or stiff paint brush for the pastels, and finish with a clear coat. 
I’d probably also go with a wash, such as the tamiya black pin wash.

Good luck!

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I also want to say that the petals are made of differing materials and/or were heat treated differently; as you can see, the petals with actuator links are more of a titanium yellow color while the odd ones look like monel. Id really like to know why that is, and can proceed from here. Already I have an idea where to start, but why white? I get it with the F-16 nozzles as they have ceramic blocks on the petals.

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Looks a lot like an approach one would take when painting Flanker nozzles is needed.

Paint outside and inside separately. After primer, use some mixture of jet exhaust or burnt iron with steel, highlight or darken some petals with variations of the shade above based on reference pictures, seal with clear varnish, add black pin wash, and finish with tamiya weathering master sets, snow from set B is particularly good for emulating the white ceramic effect leftovers, and weathering set D contains bluish and copper shades you might need as well. On the outside, same basic process, but I would use less blue, white and copper. The mechanism that opens the nozzle is visible on the outside, brush paint with steel and perhaps add lighter metallic color highlights to it.

Generally, you can do all this with an airbrush, but you spend 2 hrs masking for a 2 minute paint job.

I found it is generally not rocket science, you just need some experience and trial and error until you are satisfied. Practice on some junk nozzles first if you are a beginner.

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15 hours ago, Squizzy Taylor said:

The paints I used are the AK xtream for metal effects. They’re pre thinned ready for the airbrush, heaps of different shades, and you can mix the different paints to get a ‘custom’ shade if required. To dirty it up Tamiya pastels, very easy to apply, if it’s over done, wash it off with water and go again, but it’s easy built up slowly. I hope this helps!

Dumb question again - what kind of paint is AK Xtreme? Looking to get some, but need thinner for it, and I cant find any info on what kind of paint it is.

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9 hours ago, drake122 said:

Looks a lot like an approach one would take when painting Flanker nozzles is needed.

Paint outside and inside separately. After primer, use some mixture of jet exhaust or burnt iron with steel, highlight or darken some petals with variations of the shade above based on reference pictures, seal with clear varnish, add black pin wash, and finish with tamiya weathering master sets, snow from set B is particularly good for emulating the white ceramic effect leftovers, and weathering set D contains bluish and copper shades you might need as well. On the outside, same basic process, but I would use less blue, white and copper. The mechanism that opens the nozzle is visible on the outside, brush paint with steel and perhaps add lighter metallic color highlights to it.

Generally, you can do all this with an airbrush, but you spend 2 hrs masking for a 2 minute paint job.

I found it is generally not rocket science, you just need some experience and trial and error until you are satisfied. Practice on some junk nozzles first if you are a beginner.

Ive never used dry brush on weathering before. I see the kits and Im going to order some, but when it comes to finishing...does one use it last after everything is already painted with no clear coat to go over it?

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On 10/16/2021 at 4:55 AM, utley said:

This will be the first time Im going all out detailing exhaust nozzles, and the lucky winner is the F101-GE-102   for the B-1B in 1:48. Im looking for the proper staining techniques and paints I will need to pull it off. Any decent tutes out there that detail exactly how one would paint these? Been looking for a few days and havent found much of anything.

Please, have a look here :

https://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234944761-132-sukhoi-su-27-flanker-b-blue-38-kilp-yavr-new-pics/

 

(Top of p.2 : painting tips)

 

Building :

https://forum.largescaleplanes.com/index.php?/topic/44533-su-27-flanker-b-renovate-into-blue-38-finished/&tab=comments#comment-464100

 

Edited by AV O
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16 hours ago, utley said:

Nobody is asking for you to hold my hand, and the best advice you give is to do it yourself plus go buy some books. Go off on your own tirade somewhere else, and if you have advice for other people, keep it to yourself. Thats my advice to you.

Out of curiosity; would either of you responded/communicated in this way had this conversation been in-person?

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54 minutes ago, goondman said:

Out of curiosity; would either of you responded/communicated in this way had this conversation been in-person?

Oh yeah. Actually no. Had this been in person and he replied with that condescending tone with me, Id have to call an ambulance for him. Sorry dude, I wont tolerate that attitude.

Edited by utley
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1 hour ago, AV O said:

I like how he did the exhaust on his flanker. I believe Ive seen this somewhere before, but the weathering on the Flanker/Mig series is a lot different than what I normally see on aircraft as I believe they use different alloys for their nozzles. IIRC, you dont see a whole lot of bluing on featherless exhaust sleeves, and I cant recall ever seeing much bluing on any turbofans Ive ever worked on. Im always ok to be corrected though, if thats not the case. Thats why I ask these questions.

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9 hours ago, utley said:

Dumb question again - what kind of paint is AK Xtreme? Looking to get some, but need thinner for it, and I cant find any info on what kind of paint it is.

Am xtreme is an enamel based paint, it’s pre-thinned ready for airbrushing, but you’ll need something to clean your airbrush. I don’t like mixing paints and thinners, AK make an xtream thinner/ cleaner, that’s what I use to clean up 

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Just now, Squizzy Taylor said:

Am xtreme is an enamel based paint, it’s pre-thinned ready for airbrushing, but you’ll need something to clean your airbrush. I don’t like mixing paints and thinners, AK make an xtream thinner/ cleaner, that’s what I use to clean up 

Gotcha, thats exactly why I needed to know!

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21 hours ago, utley said:

Ive never used dry brush on weathering before. I see the kits and Im going to order some, but when it comes to finishing...does one use it last after everything is already painted with no clear coat to go over it?

That is not drybrushing.

You use a moist brush (I usually just lick it, haha, but you can use tap water), load it with color from the selected paint and place a dab onto the model, then use another bigger brush or a make up sponge to spread it, blend it in, etc.. If you mess up, just use a wet cotton swab to clear it all up and start over again. You can esentially do the same thing with oil paints to create fuel leaks, etc., but you have to use enamel thinner instead of water with those. 

 

I think you can spray a clear coat over the Tamiya weather master products if the paint is proper dry, but personally I never felt the need to do so, as this is usually the final step in weathering that I do. I usually also drybrush a dark metallic color (aluminium, etc.) over the prominent features of the nozzle areas, the edges, etc., but this is done before I use weathering master sets.

 

Refer to Mr.Haneto's Su-35S build thread in 48th scale here on ARC, that one has detailed pictures with notes on how he weathered the nozzles using Tamiya Weather master sets B and D.

Edited by drake122
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The guy gave you a couple of places to look where you could find some detailed processes for painting exhausts. Your response and attitude honestly sucked. I’m pasting in a link. Good luck with your model.

 

 

 

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45 minutes ago, andrew.deboer said:

The guy gave you a couple of places to look where you could find some detailed processes for painting exhausts. Your response and attitude honestly sucked. I’m pasting in a link. Good luck with your model.

 

 

 

He gave me a 3 word sentence, 2 of which I've never heard of before that had nothing to do with what I asked for, not products I need to buy. If you want to blow up on me for saying that's not what I asked for, well you are entitled to. I politely stated that's not what I was looking for, and if you believe that throwing a temper tantrum was a great response to MY statement, then maybe it's not my head that need to be examined. I apologize if it came out like that, but that attack was unwarranted. Prove me wrong.

Edited by utley
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7 hours ago, drake122 said:

That is not drybrushing.

You use a moist brush (I usually just lick it, haha, but you can use tap water), load it with color from the selected paint and place a dab onto the model, then use another bigger brush or a make up sponge to spread it, blend it in, etc.. If you mess up, just use a wet cotton swab to clear it all up and start over again. You can esentially do the same thing with oil paints to create fuel leaks, etc., but you have to use enamel thinner instead of water with those. 

 

I think you can spray a clear coat over the Tamiya weather master products if the paint is proper dry, but personally I never felt the need to do so, as this is usually the final step in weathering that I do. I usually also drybrush a dark metallic color (aluminium, etc.) over the prominent features of the nozzle areas, the edges, etc., but this is done before I use weathering master sets.

 

Refer to Mr.Haneto's Su-35S build thread in 48th scale here on ARC, that one has detailed pictures with notes on how he weathered the nozzles using Tamiya Weather master sets B and D.

This is exactly what I was looking for when I asked this question originally. Thanks for helping me out with this, I apologize for the other garbage in this thread.

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