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Faust

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About Faust

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  1. I really think that Round 2 wasn't expecting people to care about the stock tires. I'm surprised myself that anyone but me cares, but that does seem to be the case. Maybe they can have a service where you can get another two tires for free? Like a mail in thing? I doubt it, but it would certainly make this a better kit! As for the headlights, paint them light grey. I mean really light grey, like Model Master Acrylic light grey, or even white. Over the chrome, it'll work surprisingly well. I've done it on some of my kits, and it's very effective. If a bit of the chrome shows through on the raised texture, it just looks like "glint" and still works!
  2. Some kits you just never expect to be rare. Some, especially those by MPC, got issued, reissued and re-reissued and reworked so many times that it makes sense to think they’d be around forever. However, history has shown that’s almost never the case for the more mundane vehicles, like Pacers, Fieros and Pintos. That same fate applies to the MPC 1975 Datsun 620 pickup model as well. Despite numerous warmovers, customs and reworkings, the 620 hasn’t been largely seen around for years and years. When the Monster Tow Truck version was repopped by Round 2, I don’t think too many of us expected to see the stock ’75 ever see the light of day. However, we were (gladly) wrong, and somehow the good folks at Round 2 have managed to bring back this classic in a much less radical form. You can also build it purely stock… almost. Clearly, since it is an “everyday” car and an MPC, I was all over this when I saw it at my local shop. Check out this newest in Round 2’s “Legion of the dead”; it proves that with hope, anything is possible! (Still need that ’75 Sprint and Monza notchback, if you’re listening there, Round 2…) https://adamrehorn.wordpress.com/model-kits/out-of-box-reviews/round-2-mpc-1-25-1975-datsun-620-pickup/
  3. Heller's ancient Oddity - Amiot 143 OOB

    Oh God... That in 1/48... it doesn't bear thinking about! Yeah, the Potez 540 is similar, as is the Bloch 200. At least the Bloch 210 has retractable gear! Actually, of those the MB 200 is the only one I DON'T have!
  4. Heller's ancient Oddity - Amiot 143 OOB

    Now THAT is a colourful way of describing it! I'm guessing they were out of slide rules and wind tunnels and common sense when they designed it. That has to be the case, right?
  5. Heller's ancient Oddity - Amiot 143 OOB

    Was it as bad as it looks? In a way, I'm pretty excited to have a kit of that thing!
  6. Just in time for American Thanksgiving, we have many things to be thankful for and they’re all related to a turkey! Of course, I’m talking not about that most sleep-inducing of oven-roasted fowl, but something large, semi-flight capable and definitely more than a little foul. I speak, perhaps unexpectedly, of the Heller 1/72 Amiot 143! I came across this kit a few years ago, and my excitement was only equalled by my revulsion. I knew of the plane, and to see its horrors manifested in such unforgivingly mediocre plastic was the culmination of a dream of sorts. Well, a fever dream, maybe, but still… So, what do you have to be thankful for? Well, you have a few things: 1.) They don’t make them like this anymore, either in plastic or real life. 2.) Only Heller would make a kit of this, and it’s largely forgotten. 3.) Everyone needs a laugh, and this plane and kit have to be worth that. You can also be thankful that you can now experience the beast vicariously, just by clicking the link below, and you don’t have to waste money or room buying one yourself. Unless, like me, you’re just a sucker for punishment. https://adamrehorn.wordpress.com/model-kits/out-of-box-reviews/heller-1-72-amiot-143-oob/
  7. Apparently, there are two versions, someone was telling me. One has the motor (like this one) and the other doesn't. I'd like to get a less pristine example so I could get the figures for my 1/35 ICM G4; I want to do a Hitler parade car, not just have some dumb officers hanging around it.
  8. I’m only relatively new to the world of armour modelling, and most of what I’ve got is old Matchbox and Fujimi 1/76 kits. These are fun little gems that largely build well, fast and simply. I am not into the armour for the superdetailing of it all; I just pick designs that are cool-looking, unusual or funky (or a Matchbox). I don’t really care if it’s a truck, tank, SP gun or command/recon car, if it arouses my interest, I’ll give it a shot. That’s why I surprised myself when I picked up my newest armour acquisition, the old Hasegawa 1/72 Isuzu TX-40 fuel truck. I mean, it’s not all that elegant or unusual; it’s just a gas truck. However, something about it called out to me and I’m glad it did. This kit is sometimes bundled with Hasegawa’s 1/72 Japanese aircraft, in order to create a diorama set. It’s certainly a good choice for it. However, I didn’t buy it for a diorama. I just bought it because it seems to me that everyone forgets the important role that simple little trucks have in wartime, whether it was in WWII or even now. I wanted to have a little display piece that would remind everyone, including me, that there was more to ground combat than tanks and mobile guns. I wanted to immortalize the oft-disregarded vehicles toiling behind the scenes. Check out this little old kit at the link below. Sure, it’s simple, but I think it’ll be fun! https://adamrehorn.wordpress.com/hasegawa-172-isuzu-tx-40-fuel-truck-out-of-box/
  9. If there’s one thing that Build Fighters has taught us, it’s that it’s cool to customize Gundam kits. Of course, many of us knew that already. For a good number of us, the more generic types of MS kits (like Zakus, Doms and GMs) are sometimes even more attractive as canvases for our imaginations than the more famous mecha in the Gundam universe. A perfect example is the GM series from both the original Gundam, and it’s barely-upgraded Z Gundam follow on, the GM II. I was surprised when Bandai bothered to make a GM II, and I was even more surprised when I bought it. I don’t really like the GM II at all, but like all of its cannon-fodder ilk, it had potential to be so much more! Check out my GM Cannon modification to this otherwise hapless suit, giving it not only more punch and personality, but also making it harder to pin down in the UC timeline! https://adamrehorn.wordpress.com/bandai-1144-rms-179-gmii-cannon/
  10. If there’s one thing that Build Fighters has taught us, it’s that it’s cool to customize Gundam kits. Of course, many of us knew that already. For a good number of us, the more generic types of MS kits (like Zakus, Doms and GMs) are sometimes even more attractive as canvases for our imaginations than the more famous mecha in the Gundam universe. A perfect example is the GM series from both the original Gundam, and it’s barely-upgraded Z Gundam follow on, the GM II. I was surprised when Bandai bothered to make a GM II, and I was even more surprised when I bought it. I don’t really like the GM II at all, but like all of its cannon-fodder ilk, it had potential to be so much more! Check out my GM Cannon modification to this otherwise hapless suit, giving it not only more punch and personality, but also making it harder to pin down in the UC timeline! https://adamrehorn.wordpress.com/bandai-1144-rms-179-gmii-cannon/ https://adamrehorn.files.wordpress.com/2017/09/guncannon-gm-ii-017.jpg?w=400[/img]
  11. When I was learning about WWII planes, a long time ago, I was fascinated with several aircraft that just seemed strange compared to what I’d seen before. One, of course, was the Boulton Paul Defiant; it was a part-Hurricane/part-Spitfire concoction WITH A TURRET!! I grew up with the 80’s GI Joes, so I had a Rattler, which was a VTOL A-10 ripoff with a turret on it. So it didn’t look out of place because I wasn’t used to turrets, it looked out of place because I didn’t realize anyone had ever done that! I, of course, wanted a kit of it, but the only kit at the time was the old Airfix one, and even 25 years ago I knew that kit was a piece of, well, “history”, shall we say. I’ve had to wait a long time for a decent, affordable Defiant in 1/72, but now that Airfix’s new kit is here, I can say it was worth it! Check out my completed Defiant, and be amazed at how far Airfix actually has come from the old days! https://adamrehorn.wordpress.com/model-kits/planes/airfix-172-boulton-paul-defiant-mk-i/
  12. You know when you’re going through a hobby shop, and you find something so weird, you have to buy it? It’s a bit like wanting to rescue the runt of the litter, I guess, and it happens to me all the time. Well, this time I’ve come across something that seems to be fairly uncommon. In fact, I can find almost nothing about it on the internet! It’s a Palmer 1970 Corvette, and I think it’s 1/32. It doesn’t actually say. Anyway, I’d like to know anything you can tell me about this kit, as well as your opinions as to what I should do with it! Check it out at the link below, and let me know what you think, both about the kit and what it’s fate should be, with the poll at the end of the article! Thanks, all! https://adamrehorn.wordpress.com/2017/09/17/palm-er-or-pop-er-give-a-man-a-hand/
  13. Mongram's old1/20 Turbo T/A (OOB)

    It had a whole lot of stuff to keep things working well under all conditions! The 301T is one of the most mechanically advanced engines of its time, especially in North America. To put a turbo on a carburetor-equipped, heavily-vacuum-dependent engine was no mean feat! Here's more detail on the Turbo T/A's mill: Faust's 301T It may seem quaint or old fashioned now, but it's the automotive equivalent to the mighty Wasp Major: Technically complex (maybe a bit overly-so) but the best you could get of its type!
  14. Mongram's old1/20 Turbo T/A (OOB)

    Normally, I can be found gushing over the latest loser car or automotive oddball that comes into my collection. However, even I have an appreciation for cool cars; it’s just that there aren’t that many I’d like to model. That, mind you, does NOT apply to Trans Ams. Being a fiercely proud T/A owner, I love Poncho’s fire-breathing ‘Bird in most of its guises. Of course, it’s no surprise that my favourite is the black sheep of the family; the 1980-81 Turbo Trans Am! Now, it’s not because that’s the kind of car I own (well, okay, it IS, at least partially) but also because the Turbo T/A was supposed to herald a new era of performance, but instead was a short-lived, now-largely-forgotten experiment. It was Poncho’s last strike at the demons of efficiency that soon engulfed the enthusiast motoring scene. It failed, but it had potentinal. While most people don’t even remember it today, the Turbo T/A was a huge deal, and there were a tonne of kits, toys, etc. of the car. It was futuristic and classic all at once, and it was cool enough to be a pace car twice – once in each year it was alive! Thus, it seems fitting to remind people of this forgotten road warrior with a look at a somewhat forgotten kit: the Monogram 1/20 Turbo Trans Am! Check it out at the link below, and get ready to relive the end of an era! https://adamrehorn.wordpress.com/monogram-120-1981-turbo-trans-am-pace-car-oob/
  15. Arii's old J2M3 - Out of Box Reviews

    Well, there might be a few shape issues, but I agree, Don. That VIII looks plenty like a Spitfire to me! Nice work, too. See, that's the thing with me. I don't care if there are a few inaccuracies... so long as the finished product looks pretty close to what it's supposed to be, then I'm good. I mean, I build Frogs and Hellers from the '60s and '70s (don't forget the Farpros, either), so "rough" has a different meaning for me. I don't like to obsess on perfection of kit; I'd rather focus on making it as good as possible with what they've given me!
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