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Faust

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About Faust

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  1. If there’s one thing that Build Fighters has taught us, it’s that it’s cool to customize Gundam kits. Of course, many of us knew that already. For a good number of us, the more generic types of MS kits (like Zakus, Doms and GMs) are sometimes even more attractive as canvases for our imaginations than the more famous mecha in the Gundam universe. A perfect example is the GM series from both the original Gundam, and it’s barely-upgraded Z Gundam follow on, the GM II. I was surprised when Bandai bothered to make a GM II, and I was even more surprised when I bought it. I don’t really like the GM II at all, but like all of its cannon-fodder ilk, it had potential to be so much more! Check out my GM Cannon modification to this otherwise hapless suit, giving it not only more punch and personality, but also making it harder to pin down in the UC timeline! https://adamrehorn.wordpress.com/bandai-1144-rms-179-gmii-cannon/
  2. If there’s one thing that Build Fighters has taught us, it’s that it’s cool to customize Gundam kits. Of course, many of us knew that already. For a good number of us, the more generic types of MS kits (like Zakus, Doms and GMs) are sometimes even more attractive as canvases for our imaginations than the more famous mecha in the Gundam universe. A perfect example is the GM series from both the original Gundam, and it’s barely-upgraded Z Gundam follow on, the GM II. I was surprised when Bandai bothered to make a GM II, and I was even more surprised when I bought it. I don’t really like the GM II at all, but like all of its cannon-fodder ilk, it had potential to be so much more! Check out my GM Cannon modification to this otherwise hapless suit, giving it not only more punch and personality, but also making it harder to pin down in the UC timeline! https://adamrehorn.wordpress.com/bandai-1144-rms-179-gmii-cannon/ https://adamrehorn.files.wordpress.com/2017/09/guncannon-gm-ii-017.jpg?w=400[/img]
  3. When I was learning about WWII planes, a long time ago, I was fascinated with several aircraft that just seemed strange compared to what I’d seen before. One, of course, was the Boulton Paul Defiant; it was a part-Hurricane/part-Spitfire concoction WITH A TURRET!! I grew up with the 80’s GI Joes, so I had a Rattler, which was a VTOL A-10 ripoff with a turret on it. So it didn’t look out of place because I wasn’t used to turrets, it looked out of place because I didn’t realize anyone had ever done that! I, of course, wanted a kit of it, but the only kit at the time was the old Airfix one, and even 25 years ago I knew that kit was a piece of, well, “history”, shall we say. I’ve had to wait a long time for a decent, affordable Defiant in 1/72, but now that Airfix’s new kit is here, I can say it was worth it! Check out my completed Defiant, and be amazed at how far Airfix actually has come from the old days! https://adamrehorn.wordpress.com/model-kits/planes/airfix-172-boulton-paul-defiant-mk-i/
  4. You know when you’re going through a hobby shop, and you find something so weird, you have to buy it? It’s a bit like wanting to rescue the runt of the litter, I guess, and it happens to me all the time. Well, this time I’ve come across something that seems to be fairly uncommon. In fact, I can find almost nothing about it on the internet! It’s a Palmer 1970 Corvette, and I think it’s 1/32. It doesn’t actually say. Anyway, I’d like to know anything you can tell me about this kit, as well as your opinions as to what I should do with it! Check it out at the link below, and let me know what you think, both about the kit and what it’s fate should be, with the poll at the end of the article! Thanks, all! https://adamrehorn.wordpress.com/2017/09/17/palm-er-or-pop-er-give-a-man-a-hand/
  5. Mongram's old1/20 Turbo T/A (OOB)

    It had a whole lot of stuff to keep things working well under all conditions! The 301T is one of the most mechanically advanced engines of its time, especially in North America. To put a turbo on a carburetor-equipped, heavily-vacuum-dependent engine was no mean feat! Here's more detail on the Turbo T/A's mill: Faust's 301T It may seem quaint or old fashioned now, but it's the automotive equivalent to the mighty Wasp Major: Technically complex (maybe a bit overly-so) but the best you could get of its type!
  6. Mongram's old1/20 Turbo T/A (OOB)

    Normally, I can be found gushing over the latest loser car or automotive oddball that comes into my collection. However, even I have an appreciation for cool cars; it’s just that there aren’t that many I’d like to model. That, mind you, does NOT apply to Trans Ams. Being a fiercely proud T/A owner, I love Poncho’s fire-breathing ‘Bird in most of its guises. Of course, it’s no surprise that my favourite is the black sheep of the family; the 1980-81 Turbo Trans Am! Now, it’s not because that’s the kind of car I own (well, okay, it IS, at least partially) but also because the Turbo T/A was supposed to herald a new era of performance, but instead was a short-lived, now-largely-forgotten experiment. It was Poncho’s last strike at the demons of efficiency that soon engulfed the enthusiast motoring scene. It failed, but it had potentinal. While most people don’t even remember it today, the Turbo T/A was a huge deal, and there were a tonne of kits, toys, etc. of the car. It was futuristic and classic all at once, and it was cool enough to be a pace car twice – once in each year it was alive! Thus, it seems fitting to remind people of this forgotten road warrior with a look at a somewhat forgotten kit: the Monogram 1/20 Turbo Trans Am! Check it out at the link below, and get ready to relive the end of an era! https://adamrehorn.wordpress.com/monogram-120-1981-turbo-trans-am-pace-car-oob/
  7. Arii's old J2M3 - Out of Box Reviews

    Well, there might be a few shape issues, but I agree, Don. That VIII looks plenty like a Spitfire to me! Nice work, too. See, that's the thing with me. I don't care if there are a few inaccuracies... so long as the finished product looks pretty close to what it's supposed to be, then I'm good. I mean, I build Frogs and Hellers from the '60s and '70s (don't forget the Farpros, either), so "rough" has a different meaning for me. I don't like to obsess on perfection of kit; I'd rather focus on making it as good as possible with what they've given me!
  8. Arii's old J2M3 - Out of Box Reviews

    That's good to know that some of their other stuff is good too. I found out that this was originally an Otaki, so it makes sense it's good. I've got an old 1/144 Thud by Otaki, and it's nice, too. That one looks good, Don!
  9. I love eclectic subject matter; whether it’s cars, planes tanks or robots, a model of something out of the ordinary usually gets my immediate attention, not to mention my money and time. However, there are some “famous” and “mainstream” subjects that are just too cool to turn away from. For me, one of those is the somewhat-famous J2M Raiden, known as “Jack” to the Allies in WWII. I usually prefer Japanese multi-seat or multi-engined planes; most of their single-seaters don’t do much for me. However, the Jack, whick looks almost as much like an air racer as an interceptor has always been a favourite of mine. The problem is, there are almost no good kits of it in 1/72, and I’m not willing to pay what they want for the few that do exist. However, since the Jack is so small, even in 1/48 it’s not a lot bigger than some 1/72 WWII twin-engined planes. Thus, I was able to finally add a Jack to my collection recently by picking up the old Arii second-hand. I have to say, give the age, it’s a good looking kit. Sure, it’s not as detailed as some more modern ones, perhaps, but for what I paid (and how horrified I was with the Arii Wirbelwind I got was) I was very pleasantly surprised. Check out my out of box review for this likely mostly-forgotten example of Japan’s pudgy interceptor at the link below! Anyone built this guy? https://adamrehorn.wordpress.com/model-kits/out-of-box-reviews/arii-148-mitsubishi-j2m3-model-21-raiden-jack-oob/
  10. As modellers, most of us are familiar with aftermarket stuff. I mean, there’s almost always some kind of extra detail sets, conversion kits, decals or weapons sets that you can buy for a kit, regardless of what kind of model it is, or how much it cost. We’re used to it and we accept it. However, it’s a bit different when you’re talking about toys. It seems to me to be asking a bit much of parents to create a toy specifically to go ONLY with another toy, especially when the one being accessorized is the biggest and most expensive toy in the whole line! Maybe that happens more than I think it does, but regardless, I know that practice has been going on for a long time. A perfect old example is the Dinky No. 667 Missile Servicing Platform Vehicle from the early 1960s! This good-sized vehicle existed only to go with the No. 666 Corporal Missile Launcher, the largest and most expensive Dinky of the time! So, while it might not be a model in the strictest sense, it’s a pretty cool replica of a very oddball vehicle, and worth checking out. Also, while it might not be an accessory in the purest meaning of the word, the fact it it’s really not that functionally valuable without the Corporal. So, take a peek at this old-school piece of British iron and remember that complimentary goods have been around a long time! https://adamrehorn.wordpress.com/cool-stuff/military-dinky-toys/dinky-no-667-missile-servicing-platform-vehicle/
  11. LOL! When it comes to something like this little zit, does anyone even want to own up to it? :) While I can still build them, I really enjoy the small tanks. They take up very little space, are fast to build, and look more than decent when done. I also get to improve my groundwork skills on the Matchbox diorama bases, so it's win all the way around!
  12. It’s not only in cars and planes that I have a love for the weird and wonderful; I also like to get kits of oddball armoured subjects! While there’s nothing wrong with Shermans and Panthers, it’s nice to have a few less common vehicles to compare them too. Thankfully, when it comes to 1/76 armour, both Matchbox and Fujimi seem to have covered a lot of the bases! A perfect example of this is the 1/76 Fujimi Type 97-Kai “Chi-Ha”. This was one of Japan’s “heavier” tanks of the war, and it makes an interesting, if not anemic, counterpoint to its much more powerful contemporaries. I managed to pick this little old gem up at a model show, so I didn’t even have to pay much for it! Check out the kit out of box at the link below. Even if it’s not your thing, you’ll have to admit it looks pretty good for its age and size! https://adamrehorn.wordpress.com/fujimi-176-type-97-kai-shinhoto-chi-ha-oob/
  13. See, I didn't like the Mystere (that's what we called the MX-6 up here in Canada; I don't know if you guys called it that in the States or not) that much. It always looked oddly-proportioned, and kind of like the Buick Wildcat concept of the late '80s combined with a bit of a squished frog. However, I WOULD love a kit of one! :)
  14. White with blue would actually look pretty nice, given how ugly the car actually was! Lolz! That's a good point! Sorry to hear that happened. My dad's '89 Escort's timing belt went, but it was the 1.9 and thankfully no damage was done!
  15. I grew up in the “Automotive Dark Ages”, among throngs of gutless econoboxes and the rusting hulks of the last survivors of the ‘70s. As far as being interesting for an automotive enthusiast goes, that era was pretty much a wash. However, I do remember as the ‘80s wore on that things started to change, and as I watched a new breed of “economical” performance cars came into being. These weren’t the rip-snorting muscle cars that my Uncle had raised me on and that I’d seen at car shows, but they weren’t the wheezing, soul-destroying, square-cornered beaters I’d seen for the last 10 years. Rather, they were some interesting mix of the two. They had modern aerodynamics and front-wheel drive (unlike a true performance car, I still feel), but tried to recapture some of the fun of driving. A perfect example of such a car was the Ford Probe GT. I remember when it came out that it made quite an impact on me. Clearly, it did on others, too, since I remember seeing lots of them around. A sporty car for the masses, then, and one that helped to pave the way for it to be okay to want more than just a beige hatchback. Because I remember the car so well, I was really happy to get my hands on one of the AMT Probe GT kits. It’s one of my earlier builds, but it still looks pretty good, so I thought I’d share. Check it out, and if you ever drove one of these, let me know what you think! https://adamrehorn.wordpress.com/model-kits/cars/125-amt-1989-ford-probe-gt/
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