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Faust

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  1. While many of my built WWII Luftwaffe planes are, in fact, “What-Ifs” or Luft ‘46ers, I do have a goodly number of actual Luftwaffe hardware in my stash as well. One type that I’d been eager to get a nice kit of was the Me-410, since it’s an unusual looking plane, as well as having something of a loser heritage that I just can’t resist. I had a 1/48 Monogram years ago, but it was so big that I sold it to make some room. Since then, I’ve not seen a small kit of the -410 that I’ve wanted to get. That was until I ran into the Fine Molds one at a local show. For the price, I figured I could treat myself and get a nice kit of a cool, and real(!) plane. Check out my out of box review below in case you’re thinking of snagging one yourself. However, just like the Luftwaffe, I wouldn’t get your expectations unjustifiably high… https://adamrehorn.wordpress.com/fine-molds-me-410-a-1-b-1-out-of-box/
  2. Faust

    Keepin' it small! 1/20 Rex Combi (OOB)

    Yeah, I agree. However, it also looks like a Fiesta, so I guess there are only so many ways to make a tiny econobox, at least in the early '80s! I'm pretty sure this car is smaller than a rabbit, though. In fact, I think the 1/20 Rex is about as big as a 1/25 or 1/24 Rabit!
  3. For those who grew up in the ‘60s or ‘70s, big cars were just the norm. For those, like me, who grew up in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s, large cars were still quite plentiful, but they weren’t being replaced as they died. No, instead, we got to see them replaced by much smaller, imported cars, with transverse engines and none-too-exciting two-box hatchback body styles. At the time, these newcomers looked positively ridiculous in comparison. However, most of us never knew that things got much, much smaller than that! Given that I love everyday cars, weird cars and loser cars (or at least those that suck due to inherent non-excitingness), it’s not a surprise that I have a goodly number of weird kits in my stash. I’m also a bit of a 1/20 lover, although I’ve never built one, I have a lot of them, and I’m always on the lookout for more. Thankfully, I managed to find one that isn’t going to suck up much shelf space! If you want small, quirky and outright laughably non-aggressive, check out my recently acquired 1/20 Subaru Rex Combi! Don’t tell me I don’t bring you the weirdness in spades! https://adamrehorn.wordpress.com/model-kits/out-of-box-reviews/1-20-aoshima-1981-subaru-rex-combi-out-of-box/ ]
  4. A lot of people feel like they should root for the underdog. Well, if that was the case, then the Japanese stable of WWII tanks would be getting love like no tomorrow! Of course, that’s not the case, and it fact I didn’t know much about Japanese tanks, other than that they were largely inadequate, until I picked up the old Fuijimi 1/76 Shinhoto Chi-Ha at a show. It was the same scale as my Matchboxes, and it looked weak and unloved, so I thought why not. Just like Charlie Brown’s Christmas Tree, I thought if I gave the little guy some love he might turn out okay. Given that this is only my third tank, I actually am rather pleased at how it ended up. If you’re a fan of obscure and ineffective military hardware, follow the link below. Given that I’m pretty new to armour, I’d be very appreciative of any comments you guys have! https://adamrehorn.wordpress.com/fujimi-1-76-type-97-kai-shinhoto-chi-ha/
  5. A lot of people feel like they should root for the underdog. Well, if that was the case, then the Japanese stable of WWII tanks would be getting love like no tomorrow! Of course, that’s not the case, and it fact I didn’t know much about Japanese tanks, other than that they were largely inadequate, until I picked up the old Fuijimi 1/76 Shinhoto Chi-Ha at a show. It was the same scale as my Matchboxes, and it looked weak and unloved, so I thought why not. Just like Charlie Brown’s Christmas Tree, I thought if I gave the little guy some love he might turn out okay. Given that this is only my third tank, I actually am rather pleased at how it ended up. If you’re a fan of obscure and ineffective military hardware, follow the link below. Given that I’m pretty new to armour, I’d be very appreciative of any comments you guys have! [/b] https://adamrehorn.files.wordpress.com/2018/04/chi-ha-038.jpg?w=380[/img]
  6. I have that Dinah Trainer, but as an Arii! I also have the Mania Babs. Both are really nice, even more impressive when you consider how long ago they were made, and what their competition looked like!
  7. Wow... now that is some sketchy glue (?) if ever I've seen it! None of my FROGS have come with anything like that, at least not to my knowledge! I don't remember seeing anything like it, so I'll have to keep my eyes open. Of course, all mine are second-hand, and I wouldn't be surprised if someone threw out that little tube. What good is that little glue supposed to do you anyway? Sheesh. Thanks for the fun pic!
  8. It’s not just unusual subject matter that always attracts me to a kit. Even I tend to like some of the more famous subjects in aviation history. However, it’s always nice if it can be a bit of both; fairly well-known, but still a bit outside of the ordinary. This is not easy to do for WWII aircraft, which tend to either be famous or forgotten. One plane, though, that does manage to straddle the line is the Yokosuka D4Y, known as the “Judy” in Allied code. I’ve always liked the Judy, both in its inline- and radial-engined forms, and like the Seiran, it always looks to me like a heavy fighter rather than a bomber. Of course, it wouldn’t be me if I was reviewing just another Judy. Nope. I managed to come across something of an old and unusual kit this time; one of the old (1960’s, I believe) LS models in the conveniently not-in-scale-to-anything size of 1/75! Just the box art on this thing is worth the price I paid! Check it out, and prepare to be amazed at what LS could do a half century ago, and be saddened by how far other kit makers still have to go to catch up. https://adamrehorn.wordpress.com/model-kits/out-of-box-reviews/ls-models-1-75-yokosuka-d4y2-suisei-judy-oob/
  9. One of the most difficult things to do when building car kits is getting the finish right. I’ve had a lot of tough times trying to get things sanded and polished to make my cars look right. I’ve tried a bunch of stuff and some of it worked, and some of it didn’t. I thought it was just me that was having a hard time, but apparently that’s not the case. At our local modelling club, we do presentations once a month on different skill sets. I was asked by the club members if I could do a demonstration on how I do car finishes. I was more than glad to share what I’ve found out with my fellow club members. The presentation was even recorded for posting online afterwards! If you would like to check it out and see how I get my Chevettes and Volares looking like I do, please feel free. Any comments, as always, are welcome! https://adamrehorn.wordpress.com/2018/04/15/the-medium-and-fine-and-ultra-fine-is-the-message/
  10. When they said “Everything old is new again”, they weren’t kidding! I just recently went to my local Hobby Toy Central and was shocked to find old Silhouette Formula F-91 kits on the shelves! The last time I saw that was literally 18 year ago! In fact, I figured that these kits had all disappeared and would never be seen or heard from again. To that end, 15 years ago, I took the opportunity to grab one that a student of mine found in Asia when he was home for the summer. I would have placed bets that it was the last of its kind that would be found on this continent when he brought it to me. Well, I guess that was wrong… Still, the timing couldn’t be better, since I can show off my old-new-oldly new new kit (you followed that, right?) and be right on the bandwagon! So, check out my RXF-91 Kai Silhouette Gundam at the link below, and let the retro robot assault begin! https://adamrehorn.wordpress.com/bandai-1-100-rxf-91-kai/
  11. While it’s true that I do have a certain affection for “loser cars”, I do have SOME automotive taste. I can appreciate a good piece of automotive technology; a car that encompases style, performance and advanced engineering. Of course, it helps if that car is also something I see, or at least saw, every day; I do still have a thing for the “common” car, even if it’s uncommonly cool. A perfect example of this is the Dodge Stealth. I remember when they first came out, it was like pretty much nothing I’d seen before, and I really did find them attractive, even with that weird spoiler of theirs, tucked so close to the back window in defiance of convention. That’s why I was very happy to get my hands on not only a kit of the Stealth, but a BIG kit! I didn’t even know there was a 1/20 scale version of Dodge’s “everyday supercar”, but it turns out Lindberg had me fooled. Good old Lindberg, once again to the fore with the Mopar weirdness! Check out my out of box review of this kit below, and make some room; it’s not a small beastie! https://adamrehorn.wordpress.com/model-kits/out-of-box-reviews/lindberg-1-20-dodge-stealth-r-t-turbo-oob/
  12. When I started modelling, I was only into fast, modern jets. As I have gone on in the hobby, though, I’ve broadened my horizons considerably, expanding to WWII and Vietnam subjects as well. One era, though, that I’ve only recently found I enjoy is the early years of the jet age. Those awkward years in the ‘50s when things weren’t quite understood yet. There were some pretty weird designs then, and it seems that the British had a lot of them. One plane that I always wanted a nice kit of was the Supermarine Swift. How the company that gave us the Spitfire had such a hard time designing jets I’ll never understand, but the Swift was about the best they could come up with (save maybe the Scimitar). Thankfully, New Airfix saw fit to issue a new kit of this rather obscure plane, and I was quick to snatch it up. It is likely the nicest Airfix I’ve worked on to date! Check out my out of box review in case you’re thinking of getting one! https://adamrehorn.wordpress.com/model-kits/out-of-box-reviews/1-72-airfix-swift-fr-5-oob/
  13. Yeah, that's a fair assessment! As for "ripoffery", I'm sure it's a word. I mean Shakespeare made up words all the time, and we use all of his. No reason we modellers have to play second fiddle to some dead poet guy! :)
  14. One thing I’ve noticed as I continue in this great hobby, is that the longer I build, the more varied the subject matter I’m attracted to becomes. When I started, it was fast Vietnam-era or newer jets only. Then there was some WWII, then Gundams came along, then any weird plane, then cars, submarines and most recently tanks. However, one thing I’ve never been, and doubted I ever would be, interested in was surface ships. This is nothing against surface ship kits; I know there are many excellent ones. However, I just don’t like ships much, and I don’t find them too interesting on a personal level. I’d rather build a loser car or some obscure failure of a plane than a ship. Well, that was until now. Thanks to Meng, I have been sucked into the world of surface vessels. However, I’ve not gone easily into that dark night. Oh no. “What do you mean?” you ask. Well, the first surface ship I’m ever going to review, and in fact (likely) build is the Meng Warship Builder Lexington (CV-2). What makes it right up my alley, though, is that it’s an SD (Super Deformed) carrier, or “egg boat”. It was so off the wall that I had to pick it up. Check out this weirdo of a kit at the link below. I think it’ll be a scream! https://adamrehorn.wordpress.com/model-kits/out-of-box-reviews/meng-non-scale-warship-builder-cv-2-lexington-oob/
  15. Well it’s finally done! The Revell 1964 Chevy Fleetside is the first pickup truck kit that I’ve ever built, although I do have many others in the stash. It was similar to a car, which was nice, but it was also a nice break, with some distinct differences in build order and challenges. I was originally attracted to this kit because it was something different from what I normally build, and I figured it would give me a chance to paint something in nice, ‘60s colours and with some chrome on it. I’m not that used to chrome, since so much of my stuff is 80’s-era, wherein all trim was blacked out to be “Euro style”. I have to say I’m very pleased with the result, although it wasn’t as easy to achieve as I might have thought it would be, given how relatively simple the build looked. Still, it’s one of the most eye-catching pieces in my display, and I enjoyed having something with whitewalls and chrome. Check out the build, with more pictures, at the link below. Let me know what you think, as always! https://adamrehorn.wordpress.com/model-kits/cars/revell-1-25-1964-chevy-fleetside/
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