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Faust

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About Faust

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  1. Thanks to the rather mild winter weather here, I haven’t had to shovel much this year, so that has give me some time to make some more progress on my California Sunshine “Valkyrie Truck”. I’ve managed to get the guts all assembled, now all that’s left is the bodywork and exhaust! Check out my progress here – maybe I’ll actually get this thing finished this calendar year! Will wonders never cease, eh? https://adamrehorn.wordpress.com/2024/02/12/california-sunshine-update-2-youth-takes-guts/
  2. With a lot going on, some projects get pushed to the back burner. When the kit in question is an old MPC, that may be surprising, but it can happen. Case in point: the MPC California Sunshine kit. A lot happening at home, combined with straightout lying on MPC’s part have combined to make this one a bit of a non-starter. However, things are rolling again, and it’s my pledge to get this thing done before the end of the year! It’s time to clear the backlog and get the Sunshine back in my life! Check out my progress so far at the link below, and if you have one of these, get read
  3. It’s close to Christmas, and while I don’t have a holiday-themed Gundam kit this year, I do have something that’s a bit out-of-this-world: the ancient Academy Apollo Command/Service Module! I’m not really a “real space” builder, and have an interest in space travel, but never really to the level of wanting to model subjects from it. However, I needed something small and fast, something simple I could finish and get on display since I was in a bit of a rut. Of course, this little guy turned out to be a bit more complicated than it should have been, most of that being my own fault, m
  4. As I go through my modelling journey, I find that I get onto “themes”; I’ll go hog-wild over various familes of planes, and scoop up all of what I can locate like a Roomba eats dirt. Sometimes it’s a specific type of plane, like a float plane, or one-seaters that were made from two-seaters. Other times, I get fixated on a service, like the WWII IJN or Royal Navy jets. One such tear saw me dive into the world of US Navy and Marines jets. My Twogar is a result of that particular episode. However, it’s likely no surprise that even when “under the influence” of a particular fetish, I s
  5. Happy Canadian Thanksgiving, everyone! Normally, I’m a 1/72 plane person, although I do have a few kits in 1/48 due to the subject’s availability in 1/72. However, it’s very, very rare for me to bother with ktis any larger than that. Well… it used to be. My old-kit lust got the better of me at a recent model show and I fell in love with some old, early 1970s-era, 1/32 Japanese fighters! They come from a number of companies, and make a very interesting counterpoint to what we expect out of a kit in that scale today! I thought I’d fight my Turkey Hangover by putting these out ther
  6. When I was little, my uncle used to sit me on his lap and we’d look at car books. He had a lot of them, and he’d use them and models to teach me about cars, their parts and how they work. It’s not a surprise then, that I have more than a passing interest in cars, let alone model cars, eh? We also used to go to car shows and museums a lot, and I used to get to see a lot of Brass Era cars. I always thought they were neat, but that they all looked kinda the same. Well, except for one kind: the Stanley Steamer! Even I could recognize a Stanley in a field of other Brass Era cars, thank
  7. Even though there’s been a tonne of stuff that has been going on in the background, I still manage to get things done once in a while! This time, I’m pleased to be able to put my Vietnam-era FAC TF-9J Cougar on my shelf. While I am not a fan of the fighter version, I have always thought the TF-9J was a gorgeous airplane, fixing all the Cougar’s awkward nasal bumps and stumpiness, and being a snappy dresser to boot! What’s even cooler is that it was only the Trainer that ever got to go to war, something rather unusual, I think. Check out my Sword Twogar at the link below
  8. One of my favourite things as a modeller is seeing kits in person you never thought you’d see; Either built, at a show, or better yet, for sale somewhere so you can add it to your stash! For me, that’s tied with the thrill of finding out there IS a kit of THAT, whatever weird and wonderful “that” that maybe. No wonder, then, I love going to antiques stores and swap meets – it’s like a giant garage sale of potential sprue awesomeness! It’s rare to find a lot of variety, but this spring proved to have a bumper crop of old and varied models out there waiting for me! About the only thi
  9. There’s a certain kind of good feeling that comes from knowing that people enjoy what you do. For me, I get that when people comment on my builds or articles and appreciate the work I put into them. However, once in a while, some people go the extra mile. They recognize the weird and wonderful that make me and the Sprue Lagoon tick, and out of the kindness of their hearts send me kits that they think will make for good review material and additions to my eclectic stash. One such event happened very recently, when I received some emails from a fan in Texas who clearly understood my
  10. With trees and flowers busting out into bloom as we enter the middle of spring, I thought it would be appropriate to go back in time a bit and check out something else that was a breakout – the classic Nadia: The Secret of Blue Water anime! This was a huge success that put Gainax (later known for Evangelion) on the map, and proved to be a show with a large, devoted fanbase. Oddly, though, despite its success, Nadia did not generate a lot of love in styrene. So far as I know, only the main ship, the Nautilus, saw mainstream release as a kit back in the day. This was a time when Ban
  11. No arguments. I was pretty tired when I was posting this. If someone knows how to move it, you'll find no opposition from me! Sorry for the inconvenience.
  12. A great spring tradition here in Ontario is the HeritageCon model show in Hamilton’s Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum. This year’s show was the biggest ever, with more than 1000 kits on display! Of course, a model show wouldn’t be complete without a vendor’s room, and it’s not a surprise that I tucked into multiple helpings of old and interesting kits, as well as managing to find some newer and nicer ones as well! Part of my yearly pilgrimage to Hamilton includes doing a hobby shop run in the area, so that helped with the count of kits procured, even if it wasn’t exactly what my w
  13. Holy mackerel! That is an amazing job! I love that variant, it's so oddly Soviet with its tacked-on extra cockpit. You've done a marvelous piece of work crafting that bird!
  14. When the French say “Vive la Difference!”, I doubt they were talking about the difference between aeronautically sound and advanced airplanes and whatever kind of flying aquaria/blimp gondolas the various French designers of the ‘20s and ‘30s were thinking about. However, one can’t deny that there is a difference there… and it is a big one! Since I already have the Amiot 143 from Heller, it should come as no surprise that I also have the nearly-equally-hideous Potez 540 in my collection! So, with spring about to sprung (or something) I thought it would be good to have a look at wha
  15. When it comes to cars, you guys know I love something a bit different. I mean sure, I love losers, and Euro-weirdness (usually ugly Renaults), but there’s something about cars with the wrong number of wheels that really get me. I love six-wheeled cars, but hey, something with three wheels is also something to get excited about! A couple of years ago, I got a bunch of 1/32 Arii three-wheeled trucks from my Uncle for Christmas. I thought it was time to see how they built up, and I have to say, it was pretty fun! If you want to see something you’re not likely to come across too often,
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