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ZAgocs

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About ZAgocs

  • Rank
    Rivet Counter
  • Birthday 05/27/1972

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    Male
  • Location
    Sandorfalva, Hungary

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  1. Hello Slartibartfast, I guess by aero boy racer stuff you mean the LP5000 version. TBH I got a diecast model of an LP5000 as a child, and my love to Lambos is based on that one... Anyway, nothing is better/faster than than Starship Bistromath, isn't it? 😉 Cheers, Zoli
  2. Hello everyone, the images of the finished model. I hope you like the final result. Cheers, Zoli
  3. So I continue with the images here (comments are added to the images)... In the next post I will add the photos of the finished model. Cheers, Zoli
  4. Hello everyone, in the past years I slowly built my Lamborghini collection. A Murcielago was done first (I was not really satisfied with the painting on it TBH) and this Tamiya Countach (LP400) was my second attempt in car modeling. So this is not really an in-progress topic, the car was finished years ago, but I try to post the photos I shot during the build - and of course the photos of the finished model. This was the first model I tried the usual polishing techniques, 3000 grit sandpaper followed by the Tamiya polishing compound set. The result was quite satisfying compared to the Murcielago model, polishing makes miracles even to a not-so-well-done finish... I took photos during the body paint only, no photos of the interior/engine/chassis build unfortunately. First I had to paint the dark blue plastic to gloss white, as I wanted my Countach to be a nice yellow one... IIRC (it was about four years ago I posted anything here) there shouldn't be too many images in one post, so I will continue in the next post...
  5. Hi Jan! Thank you! TBH viewing similar builds ten years ago here on ARC I thought the same - I won't be able to do it ever. Practicing helps - and finally you find out that it is simpler than it looks. Try it! :) The references: photos from the net, primeportal and of course ARC's walkaround gallery. One more source: youtube. e.g. I have just found a nice walkaround of the Hornet on youtube where all the wheel wells were filmed in great details. One note about accuracy: if I had only a blurry photo of the given part of the Super Hornet, I used photos of the same detail of the B or D variant. I hope not too many people will notice the differences in 1/48... :) Unfortunately I did not take photos during the cockpit build except the ones already posted here. The method to create the details on the instrument panels was the one J. M. Villalba described in his books: drill a hole into thin (0.1 mm) sheet styrene and cut it around as tightly as you can - and you have an instrument. Same goes for displays: create four corner of the inside using a pin, cut the inside and then cut it around. Use a sharp X-Acto blade. About every second attempt is successful, no worries if you do not succeed at first. Switches: create a small hole using a pin, cut stretched sprue and put the switch into place with a small amount of glue. I hope this helps. Cheers, Zoli
  6. Hi everyone! Sorry for the late reaction, I built papercraft models with my sons all weekend. My eight years old son has designed and built a papercraft truck with full interior all himself without any help from his proud daddy... Thanks Janne! Thank you, christosxt! Thank you, Pappy! Yes, I know this flaw of the Italeri Super Hornet - the nonexisting airbrake is not yet glued and filled. Currently I am working on the details in the nose (cockpit, avionics, front wheel well, gun bay). I already built the 1/72 version (see it here). To me the 1/48 version seems to be just a magnified 1/72 with some extra details - and unfortunately the same problems. I try not to think about the intakes, btw... Thank you for the helpful comment and if you see anything else that is problematic do not hesitate to tell! Cheers, Zoli
  7. Thank you, dryguy! To me this is the fun part in modeling. I enjoy scratchbuilding as much details with my own hands as I can - create something using only those simple materials (even if the quality is far from the pro resin parts). Once someone has successfully finished the first scratchbuilt part there's no turning back... ;) I guess there are a lot of modelers on this forum who agree with me... And a sidenote: TBH, much more can be achieved this way, I am not a skilled one, just an amateur. I do it (somehow) in 1/48 - talented people do it far better even in 1/72 scale... Thank you, Fly-n-hi! Cheers, Zoli
  8. When scratchbuilding was done I finished the work with a protective layer of paint. Next victim(s): the avionics bays on both sides of the Super Hornet. If you go back to the first page you can see that the boxes were done years ago... Now I am going to build all the small details inside. Cheers, Zoli
  9. Hi everyone! In the months since the last update I successfully built the cockpit for my Super Hornet. I might not be as nice as a resin one would be but building it was modeling fun from the first moment to the last. I enjoyed it, the cockpit now looks busy, resembles to the real one (well, more or less) and that is enough for me. I hope you will enjoy the pictures. Continued...
  10. Thanks man. I try to reformulate my question giving a bit more background on it then. I was googling for the magical yellow acetate sheet for half a day using different search keywords, following the links and image hits - it was the first thing I tried. Almost all (or all) of the Google hits are transparent projector film or something similar like yellow acetate overlay sheet. The latter looks to be the closest match, like this one here. But this one - being a reading aid - is also transparent. Checking Villalba's pictures on Facebook (here and here) it seems to me (I could be wrong) that the material he uses is not transparent. So finally I ran out of ideas what this material could be. My question is: does anyone know what this material is on the above pictures? Either the name of it (or the manufacturer) or the web shop link where it can be ordered? I would like to try it out scratchbuilding some details. Thanks in advance, Zoli
  11. Hi guys, I still have the same problem - and just seen the same question asked directly from Mr. Villalba on Facebook, left unanswered unfortunately. So my question is the same - anyone in the last nine years (since the last comment added to this topic) found out what this material is, what is the exact name or where can us mortal modelers buy it? Cheers, Zoli
  12. Hi guys! Shaka, I think the model would not look better with any kind of camera - a better one would show more flaws on the other hand. TBH I did not stay interested most of the time - if you check my signature, ALL of the finished models were built parallel to this one in this four years. So if the project is getting boring, switch to another one and build that. Thank you Clif for these kind words! Cheers, Zoli
  13. Hi Kike! Nice to see that you took a deep breath and started it! I absolutely agree with Joel. After you started scratchbuilding, you cant stop it. One advice: dryfit your work as often as you can to avoid problems later. Good luck with your build! Cheers, Zoli
  14. Hi ChippyWho! Thanks for your kind words! Well, this build thread is about four years old - that was a long sleep for you... The markings are the inbox ones - or I misunderstood your question. Cheers, Zoli
  15. Hi Alex! Thank you for your kind, positive and constructive comment! I totally agree with you - weathering is quite a weak point on my models. Not a surprise as this step needs artistic talent - which I totally lack. As I said in the previous post I plan to practice/experiment with it on a cheap OOB 1/72 model. I will leave the Phantom as it is because I find it a bit too risky to try new techniques on this model. Cheers , Zoli
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