Jump to content
ARC Discussion Forums

Sign in to follow this  
TomcatFanatic123

Resin parts...

Recommended Posts

I ordered a BB cockpit for my Tamiya 1/32nd scale F-14, and it arrived today. When I opened the box, I was a little intimidated... :cheers: :D. So I figured I'd come here to ask a few questions...

What exactly do I use to cut the large parts (seats, instrument hoods, etc.) It looks and feels like it's too tough for an X-acto knife. On the other hand, the smaller parts (control stick, etc) look like they probably could be sliced off with the X-acto knife, but I'm afraid to even try, because I can just see them snapping.

Secondly, what grit sandpaper should I use, or would a file be better?

Thirdly, I'm assuming I just use superglue for assembly. Do I assume correctly?

Thanks in advance for all the help...I know I can always come here for answers to my silly questions ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Tomcat,

Take your time with the resin and use some protection against the resin dust. That's the first rule! :cheers:

I use a small saw type Exacto blade to seperate the "plug" from the cockpit tub. Sometimes I take the tub to work and use our vertical belt sander to grind off unwanted material. (don't tell the shop boss!) ;)

The other items, I use a regular Exacto knife and score the line of seperation repeatedly. Don't try to cut too much at once, just keep at it, carefully.

The use of Zap-a-gap or other cynoacrylic glue is recommened for attaching it.

This info certainly isn't the last word on working with resin, I'm sure the other guys can add to it. :D

Happy modeling,

Jim ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tomcatfanatic,

For the smaller parts ,yes you may use an x-acto knife to cut away the smaller parts,just be careful not to break bits off.If you do ,you can always CA them back on.Now for the larger parts.To cut them off thier " pouring" blocks ,you should get a small razor saw,sold by x-acto.They either look like miniature back saws with very fine teeth,or they sell small blades ,that have teeth instead of a sharp edge.They come in packs of 5,like the blades.

Small files and fine sandpaper 220 ,400 grit is fine. And yes ,good old CA is the best adhesive for the purpose,although at times ,epoxy may be needed.

Try to avoid breathing the resin dust,not good :cheers:

HTH

Paul T

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some resins are more brittle than others, but treat them all as being very, very fragile until you have worked with the parts a little. I only have experience with two resin sets (Koster and Cutting Edge). The Koster parts were super brittle while the Cutting Edge parts were more pliable.

For removing large resin blocks you will need a razor saw. Parts that have a very thin attachment point can be separated using a hobby knife. You may break a part or two but don't freak out! The brittle nature of resin means that the break lines will be very clean and thus easy to glue back together with some super glue.

Have fun and wear a dust mask!

Shawn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys for all the pointers. I can't wait to get started on this project!

Oh, and thanks a lot for the heads up about not breathing the resin dust - I have a heart/lung condition that makes it EXTREMELY important for me to take extra precautions when I'm around anything having to do with inhaling any type of fumes/dusts.

Well, if I have any more questions after I get started, I know that all I have to do is come here and all you smart people will help me out ;) . THANKS AGAIN! :wave::cheers: :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

WHATTA YA MEAN THE DUST IS HARMFULL??? SMELLS BETTER THAN TENAX OR THINNER!!!!

hahahahah

:thumbsup::wave: ;)

:D hahahah

Na make sure you cover yorself from it.... Nasty Stuff

Take Care

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I must stress that you must ALWAYS sand tubs and seats bottoms wet because of the dust.

I disagree. For the bulk of resin parts preparation (removing pour stubs, etc.), I either use a motor tool, or dry sand on a sheet of very coarse (~80 grit) dry paper, with a shop vac clamped to the bench. It's actually much cleaner than wet sanding (faster and easier too :thumbsup:), and the vac sucks away all traces of dust, making it quite healthy too.

The principle is the same - minimize resin dust, and avoid inhaling it, but it doesn't HAVE to be wet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Lummy

Ok it's my turn to give my 2 cents worth.

As a dentist, I operate a motor tool and trim resin all the time. What do you think dentures are made of??? <_<

What MickeyFickey said was quite practical and is what a lot of dental lab technicians do. This with the addition of a wire mesh placed over the opening of the vac. This prevents parts that you want being sucked into the vacuum.

With smaller parts you can use a scriber and scribe the junction between the part and the casting block till it is thin enough to break GENTLY! This reduces the amount of grinding by motor tool or sanding and thus fine resin dust.

As always wear eye protection and masks.

Cheers

Lummy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...