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Jennings

Curtiss P-6E at NMUSAF

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The P-6E in Dayton was restored in the 1963 by the Purdue University Aviation Department, and has been on display at the museum since. Not a lot of P-6Es were built, and period photos of them in service are pretty rare. The airplane on display at the museum is marked as #40 of the 17th PS, 1st PG at Selfridge. The problem is, I can't seem to find references for this specific aircraft. And what you do find rarely agree.

To wit: Does the airplane have two red command stripes on the upper wing, or three? Or none? Is the "U.S. ARMY" under the wings in standard 1:4:6 45 degree corner lettering, or is it a taller, skinnier stroke width? Are the diving snow owls (which were undoubtedly hand painted) the same on both sides (highly doubtful)??

Anybody got any solid info on this airplane?

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The P-6E in Dayton was restored in the 1963 by the Purdue University Aviation Department, and has been on display at the museum since. Not a lot of P-6Es were built, and period photos of them in service are pretty rare. The airplane on display at the museum is marked as #40 of the 17th PS, 1st PG at Selfridge. The problem is, I can't seem to find references for this specific aircraft. And what you do find rarely agree.

To wit: Does the airplane have two red command stripes on the upper wing, or three? Or none? Is the "U.S. ARMY" under the wings in standard 1:4:6 45 degree corner lettering, or is it a taller, skinnier stroke width? Are the diving snow owls (which were undoubtedly hand painted) the same on both sides (highly doubtful)??

Anybody got any solid info on this airplane?

A photo in the book 'The Curtiss Hawks' by Shamburger and Christy shows an in flight photo (USAF photo page 56)of the 17th from above, the lead flight of 3 aircraft has whats looks to be (under a magnifying loop) #40 with the 3 red Command stripes on its top wing.

I would normally scan such a photo but in this case the spine of the book is my concern.

Flypaper

Just took a look in Archers book Vol I and another pic of the 17th in flight different angle but #40 is in line with other a/c and the command stripes are clearly visible.

Edited by flypaper2222

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Thanks! I had that old Shamburger book pre-fire.

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Jennings,

I've been trying (with little success) to access my pictures from 2009. If you can see beyond my friend Bill, here is the P-6E at the NMUSAF. Looks like three stripes on the top wing. I know I have a picture that shows at least part of "ARMY" on the lower wing, if I can access it.

P5080255_zpsbre50t7w.jpg

C2j

Edited by Cubs2jets

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Great pic! Even more interesting than Bill (as interesting as he certainly is!) is the fact that both ailerons are drooping!

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Jennings,

The P6-E is actually in only mediocre shape. I broke the cardinal rule of museums and "stepped over the line" when no one was around and took some close-up pictures. The cockpit is unfinished and most of the instruments were missing from the instrument panel. I am having trouble accessing those pictures at this time, but will continue trying.

I would not lend much creedence to the fact that both ailerons are drooping. There is a good chance the linkage is not even hooked up!

John Scott

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I think the Air Force museum's P-6E was not a restoration, but rather a complete new-build back in the 1960's, IIRC.

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The P-6E in Dayton is very real. It's 32-261, but restored to represent 32-240.

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My guess on the position of the ailerons in the pic is that they were installed and connected, but they weren't adjusted to the proper neutral position and the cable tension was not adjusted. (A classic case of "Good enough for Government Use!")

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