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Just finished Macross Frontier

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The original 4 part OVA series is available on 2 DVDs in english. the OVAs were reedited into a movie form later and so far only comes in japanese.

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The original 4 part OVA series is available on 2 DVDs in english. the OVAs were reedited into a movie form later and so far only comes in japanese.

I've sene both the english and Japanese versions. Like I say about most anime: WATCH IN JAPANESE!

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I've sene both the english and Japanese versions. Like I say about most anime: WATCH IN JAPANESE!

Except I don't understand Japanese. Hence, the reason I want to hear it in English.

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Except I don't understand Japanese. Hence, the reason I want to hear it in English.

Most Japanese DVDs have an english subtitles option. (I have an *ahem* acquired [how the hell else could I get it MoFo!!?!!??!] copy of Macross Zero and it come with english subs.)

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Most Japanese DVDs have an english subtitles option. (I have an *ahem* acquired [how the hell else could I get it MoFo!!?!!??!] copy of Macross Zero and it come with english subs.)

LOL

Only thing that´s annoying is that I have to watch matroska files on my putor instead of on my 50" plasmascreen ;) Lots of them, quote "acuired" series and movies, are in either matroska or ogg ;)

Great with all the language options and sub options.....but I hate watching on my putor :huh:

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LOL

Only thing that´s annoying is that I have to watch matroska files on my putor instead of on my 50" plasmascreen ;) Lots of them, quote "acuired" series and movies, are in either matroska or ogg ;)

Great with all the language options and sub options.....but I hate watching on my putor :huh:

No, its a DVD I bought that I'm almost positive is a bootleg copy.

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No, its a DVD I bought that I'm almost positive is a bootleg copy.

Currently any Macross series you can pick up with english subtitles beyond the Original SDF:Macross, Macross II, or Macross Plus is bootleg. No official US release of "Macross: Do You Remember Love?", "Flashback: 2012" (not that it needs one, really.. no real dialogue to concern onesself with). "Macross 7" (and all it's side videos/movies), "Macross: 25th anniversary", "Macross Zero" or "Macross Frontier". There WAS an official US release of the DUBBED version of DYRL (depending on which version you get either "Macross" or "Clash of the Bionoids"), but the translation is laughable at best and the acting will make you cry.

That said, there are bootlegs that are near-perfect english-translations of each (haven't seen frontier for sale on bootleg DVD yet, but then I haven't looked either)

Wanna go for the HARD stuff? Try to find the two Macross radio drama CDs! Took me forever to find them!

-Jeremy

(who owns no less than 4 different "bootleg" copies of DYRL on VHS... including one that is a copy-of-a-copy evidently and 2 on DVD)

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Currently any Macross series you can pick up with english subtitles beyond the Original SDF:Macross, Macross II, or Macross Plus is bootleg. No official US release of "Macross: Do You Remember Love?", "Flashback: 2012" (not that it needs one, really.. no real dialogue to concern onesself with). "Macross 7" (and all it's side videos/movies), "Macross: 25th anniversary", "Macross Zero" or "Macross Frontier". There WAS an official US release of the DUBBED version of DYRL (depending on which version you get either "Macross" or "Clash of the Bionoids"), but the translation is laughable at best and the acting will make you cry.

That said, there are bootlegs that are near-perfect english-translations of each (haven't seen frontier for sale on bootleg DVD yet, but then I haven't looked either)

Wanna go for the HARD stuff? Try to find the two Macross radio drama CDs! Took me forever to find them!

-Jeremy

(who owns no less than 4 different "bootleg" copies of DYRL on VHS... including one that is a copy-of-a-copy evidently and 2 on DVD)

The first copy of Macross Zero was of the AnimeOne fandub on three disks. It jerked in a couple places, the sound was slightly off and sometimes the subs were too fuzzy to read. (compared to the youtube vids) Eventually the disk got scratched really deep and i jsut pitched it, that nad it had printed lables and as such wouldn't spin right in my laptop's drive. i bought another one, my current one and its all on one disk and the sound and picture are near perfect but the subs are about a half-second late

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It's funny - Zero and Plus were both "made for Nerds" releases, direct to home video originally, with very little "mainstream" popularity and merchandising mostly in the form of model kits. To date, they're the shows that screw most with the three main pillars Kawamori always bases the Macross franchise on - Variable fighters, romantic triangles, and culture shock (with Jpop as the medium) as a weapon to end wars.

By contrast, all three of the Macross TV shows have been massively popular; have huge followings; sell music CD's, Drama CD's and other media-type merchandise by the truckload in addition to the model kits; and are accounted some of the best shows of their respective years critically. Certainly the best of their genre, at least...

Personally, I loved Frontier - it made good on quite a few of the things Seven got wrong (such as the terrible quality of animation and blatant reuse of action shots, often several times in one episode; and the "repeat until dead" method of using the songs); kept the bits that made both Seven and the original such good shows despite their faults; and it terminated at a logical stopping point without dragging things out needlessly OR feeling rushed at the end. And, it poked so much fun at various genre clichés that I was in stitches at least once each ep...

Seriously, if you understand Macross at all, you'll love Frontier. Zero and Plus aren't representative of the "real" Macross the way Frontier is...

SP

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It's funny - Zero and Plus were both "made for Nerds" releases, direct to home video originally, with very little "mainstream" popularity and merchandising mostly in the form of model kits. To date, they're the shows that screw most with the three main pillars Kawamori always bases the Macross franchise on - Variable fighters, romantic triangles, and culture shock (with Jpop as the medium) as a weapon to end wars.

By contrast, all three of the Macross TV shows have been massively popular; have huge followings; sell music CD's, Drama CD's and other media-type merchandise by the truckload in addition to the model kits; and are accounted some of the best shows of their respective years critically. Certainly the best of their genre, at least...

Personally, I loved Frontier - it made good on quite a few of the things Seven got wrong (such as the terrible quality of animation and blatant reuse of action shots, often several times in one episode; and the "repeat until dead" method of using the songs); kept the bits that made both Seven and the original such good shows despite their faults; and it terminated at a logical stopping point without dragging things out needlessly OR feeling rushed at the end. And, it poked so much fun at various genre clichés that I was in stitches at least once each ep...

Seriously, if you understand Macross at all, you'll love Frontier. Zero and Plus aren't representative of the "real" Macross the way Frontier is...

SP

Glad I'm not the only one that didn't think Macross Plus was the "end all-be all" of the Macross universe. In fact I liked it less because it focused on the fate of three people without much concern with what was going on in the outside world (sure the elements were there, but they were so incredibly muted that they seemed more like an afterthought than part of what they needed). That said, the music rocked, the animation rocked, and the YF-19 Excalibur and VF-11 Thunderbolt designs were cool (I didn't dig the Sturmvogel so much... might as well have been flying a Quaedelunn-Rau!).

I don't know too many people who liked Macross zero for anything more than the animation... at the time, many people did not think it tied in at all with any other Macross series (except for the opening of the first episode, where Shin reccolects the crash landing of the A.S.S-1 (pre SDF designation) and the presence of one (1) Roy Focker. Instead of using the last episode to firmly cement Zero's place in the series (the appearance of the VF-1, potential backdrop of the UNS Macross nearing completion), they leaned more towards a mystical "ok, so what really happened there" kind of ending, leaving the fan to draw their own conclusions (this almost ignited a civil war on Macrossworld.com between the M7 fans who looked for a higher meaning in the ending and everyone else who were left saying "***, over?"... as I wasn't a fan of M0, I didn't get involved)

In a time where "Re-inventing the wheel" has become popular (see: Batman, James Bond, etc), Macross Frontier struck me as the perfect mix between bringing everything about the original series forward that made it worth watching, whilst putting a modern, no... some would say advanced, spin on things. The Valkyries have a classic touch to their designs, while still very advanced looking. The characters I found very frustrating at first, but by episode 5 or so, everyone started to hit their stride and come into their own... THIS is how a love triangle should be portrayed! The music is very well composed, but whereas repetitive music in M7 was only a very minor frustration for me, I found myself screaming "g-damit, how many variations of "aimo" can you possibly sing!?" That said, I've gone through the trouble of hunting down all the soundtracks... lots of good tunes to be heard (both the orchestral score and the vocal pop tunes). The animation and fight-choreography are completely top shelf... Ichiro Itano (noted for the famous "Itano Circus" which is very prevalent in Macross animation)probably wet his pants putting some of these sequences together. What we wouldn't have given to have this on hand when he did DYRL!!!

It doesn't replace "Macross: Do You Remember Love?" as my favorite Macross animation, but it comes awfully close. They pay homage to pretty much every Macross animation in some way or another (even "Macross II: Lovers again", which produced by Big West WITHOUT the involvement of Studio Nue, is held by Shoji Kawamori to be a non-cannon project)

Edited by Skull Leader

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(I didn't dig the Sturmvogel so much... might as well have been flying a Quaedelunn-Rau!).

Eurk. Just like re-making the Italian Job, certain things should be forbidden. Calling this thing after one of the world's most pretty and evocative aircraft is one of them, IMHO.

Patrick

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Fun Fact: Macross DYRL was the very-first anime fansub ever. This came out of the legal issues surrounding it. The English-language rights to the Macross TV series and DYRL were sold separately by the Japanese producers. The TV series went to Carl Macek in the US, who used it as the first part of his Robotech franchise. DYRL ended up in the hands of some Australian company which created an awful, hacked-up dub of it called "Clash of the Bionoids". After Robotech turned into a hit, Macek tried to get the rights to DYRL from the Aussie anime-manglers, but their company had gone bust and the rights to DYRL had become lost in the outback of Australian bankruptcy law.

Thus, a group of college students, many of whom went on later to have a hand in founding Anime Expo, took advantage of the gray area of international copyright laws to produce an entirely non-profit fan-subtitled version of the movie. It was probably more or less legal, the way they did it - but of course, they didn't put their real names on it anyway, just in case.

So far as I know, DYRL and Flashback 2012 still are not available on DVD in the United States. Well, not legally available, that is. Well... not completely legally available, that is. The level of respect for international copyright law to be found in the Chinese-speaking areas of Planet Earth is roughly equivalent to the level of respect for feminist literature to be found in Afghanistan - and that's with people they like. It really doesn't help matters that the people whose copyrights are being infringed in anime-related cases are Japanese. So the Sinosphere is chock full of anime DVDs that originated mostly in Taiwan, where they're kinda legal because Taiwan simply does not recognize international copyright claims at all. They look like they were produced on somebody's PC, are region-free, feature aggressively mediocre picture quality, and usually have subtitles in Chinese and English. The English translations vary from more or less decent to unintelligible - with the better ones usually happening when the DVD producers find a fansub script to rip off - thus stealing both the producers' money and the fansubbers' labor of love.

So the long story short is - yes, you can find a DVD of DYRL, and Flashback 2012, (and even Mac 7 if, for some strange reason, you wanted to) - especially if you live within easy distance of Chinatown (any Chinatown will do). As to whether those are illegal or not if no one's bought the rights to that anime where you are, well.... maybe better not to ask. But seeing as how the commercial potential of Flashback 2012 is probably pretty limited and DYRL might not escape from the Australian copyright goblins anytime soon, if you want a copy on disc, that's the way to go.

The problem with all the Macross sequels is that I don't think any of them really had the courage to be as downbeat as the original. What I liked about it in the first pace - watching Robotech when I was 11 - was that it didn't talk down to me, and wasn't afraid to be dark and dramatic deal with serious subject matter. None of the sequels ever really came close - instead focusing on music, big transforming robots, cute girls, and exploding aliens. Or from my point of view, replicating everything that had made the original worthy of being a commercial success, but not what had made it a classic of the art form. My view of Frontier is more or less the same as my view of Macross II was - it's alright enough I guess, but there's nothing about it that really makes it stand out to me artistically.

Macross 7 was just horrendous - a failure on every level which is still the single anime I dislike the most - more even than Tenshi ni Narumon (I'm Gonna Be An Angel), which I am not exaggerating when I say literally made me physically ill when I watched it.

Macross Zero, I would give a 3 out of 5. Not because it was consistently so-so, but because the first three episodes were really promising, and then the whole story just kinda drove over a cliff with these weird bird-god things. If you watch the first three episodes of Mac 0 and then stop, you won't have missed anything. In fact, it's probably better that way.

Macross Plus... a lot of people are big fans of this one, and I have to admit that I am, too. But I can also see that it runs on pure "cool" factor - the music, the mech designs, the extremely high production values and great-looking animation, and so on. The storyline is pretty thin, and the characters are pretty shallowly-constructed too. So essentially, it has just enough juice to get through a four-episode OAV series leaving a good impression, but if it had tried any more than that it would have gone flat really fast.

That all said, the original Macross was my favorite anime series for years and even now is my second, just behind Legend of Galactic Heroes (and ahead of Cowboy Bebop and Ghost in the Shell). No sequel ever had any effect on how I saw it.

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Fun Fact: Macross DYRL was the very-first anime fansub ever. This came out of the legal issues surrounding it. The English-language rights to the Macross TV series and DYRL were sold separately by the Japanese producers. The TV series went to Carl Macek in the US, who used it as the first part of his Robotech franchise. DYRL ended up in the hands of some Australian company which created an awful, hacked-up dub of it called "Clash of the Bionoids". After Robotech turned into a hit, Macek tried to get the rights to DYRL from the Aussie anime-manglers, but their company had gone bust and the rights to DYRL had become lost in the outback of Australian bankruptcy law.

Thus, a group of college students, many of whom went on later to have a hand in founding Anime Expo, took advantage of the gray area of international copyright laws to produce an entirely non-profit fan-subtitled version of the movie. It was probably more or less legal, the way they did it - but of course, they didn't put their real names on it anyway, just in case.

So far as I know, DYRL and Flashback 2012 still are not available on DVD in the United States. Well, not legally available, that is. Well... not completely legally available, that is. The level of respect for international copyright law to be found in the Chinese-speaking areas of Planet Earth is roughly equivalent to the level of respect for feminist literature to be found in Afghanistan - and that's with people they like. It really doesn't help matters that the people whose copyrights are being infringed in anime-related cases are Japanese. So the Sinosphere is chock full of anime DVDs that originated mostly in Taiwan, where they're kinda legal because Taiwan simply does not recognize international copyright claims at all. They look like they were produced on somebody's PC, are region-free, feature aggressively mediocre picture quality, and usually have subtitles in Chinese and English. The English translations vary from more or less decent to unintelligible - with the better ones usually happening when the DVD producers find a fansub script to rip off - thus stealing both the producers' money and the fansubbers' labor of love.

So the long story short is - yes, you can find a DVD of DYRL, and Flashback 2012, (and even Mac 7 if, for some strange reason, you wanted to) - especially if you live within easy distance of Chinatown (any Chinatown will do). As to whether those are illegal or not if no one's bought the rights to that anime where you are, well.... maybe better not to ask. But seeing as how the commercial potential of Flashback 2012 is probably pretty limited and DYRL might not escape from the Australian copyright goblins anytime soon, if you want a copy on disc, that's the way to go.

The problem with all the Macross sequels is that I don't think any of them really had the courage to be as downbeat as the original. What I liked about it in the first pace - watching Robotech when I was 11 - was that it didn't talk down to me, and wasn't afraid to be dark and dramatic deal with serious subject matter. None of the sequels ever really came close - instead focusing on music, big transforming robots, cute girls, and exploding aliens. Or from my point of view, replicating everything that had made the original worthy of being a commercial success, but not what had made it a classic of the art form. My view of Frontier is more or less the same as my view of Macross II was - it's alright enough I guess, but there's nothing about it that really makes it stand out to me artistically.

Macross 7 was just horrendous - a failure on every level which is still the single anime I dislike the most - more even than Tenshi ni Narumon (I'm Gonna Be An Angel), which I am not exaggerating when I say literally made me physically ill when I watched it.

Macross Zero, I would give a 3 out of 5. Not because it was consistently so-so, but because the first three episodes were really promising, and then the whole story just kinda drove over a cliff with these weird bird-god things. If you watch the first three episodes of Mac 0 and then stop, you won't have missed anything. In fact, it's probably better that way.

Macross Plus... a lot of people are big fans of this one, and I have to admit that I am, too. But I can also see that it runs on pure "cool" factor - the music, the mech designs, the extremely high production values and great-looking animation, and so on. The storyline is pretty thin, and the characters are pretty shallowly-constructed too. So essentially, it has just enough juice to get through a four-episode OAV series leaving a good impression, but if it had tried any more than that it would have gone flat really fast.

That all said, the original Macross was my favorite anime series for years and even now is my second, just behind Legend of Galactic Heroes (and ahead of Cowboy Bebop and Ghost in the Shell). No sequel ever had any effect on how I saw it.

I remember reading about the fun stuff behind the original dub of DYRL several years ago, and I used to think a lot of American dubs were bad, lol (but then, we never got much good animation on US TV if you ask me), but that was the first I'd heard about the subtitled version... one of which I think I own! I agree that when it comes to some of these DVDs, it's often times better to NOT ask where they came from and just be glad it's available where we can get at it. The legal issues between Big West and Harmony Gold (often referred to in much more vulgar terms by Macross purists) aren't going to be properly resolved any time soon, if ever. Last I had heard, Harmony Gold was trying to "what if" their online community about a dubbed version of DYRL, to which I was amazed to see most of the RT fans step over to the Macross side and say " not just no, but..." which made me breathe a sigh of relief. (they r aped the TV series for "Robotech", I shudder to think what they would do to DYRL....)

There is an excellent (probably sub-legal) bootleg of the DYRL "perfect edition" for sale if you know where to look... so near as I can tell (and you're talking to someone who once downloaded the original japanese script of DYRL and had it translated) the english subtitles are pretty spot-on. The video and audio quality are on par with the original "perfect edition" release, which is nice. Since I own FB2012 on VHS and have watched it all of TWICE since I found it 9 years ago, I don't strongly desire to own it on DVD. One need not worry about an english translation for FB2012, because there's only about half a dozen spoken words in the whole video (mostly a 30 minute music video, featuring footage from Minmay's farewell concert)

Like I said, I KNOW I'm one of the 10 people in the world that actually liked Macross 7... being a musician with so much of my life connected to music in one way or the other, it kinda hit a soft spot for me. I won't bother trying to convince anyone else, lol.

DYRL was my favorite simply because it took all of the best plot elements out of the TV series, compiled them into a 2 hour movie, and gave it consistently excellent animation (nearly 2/3 of the original series were farmed out to a company called "Animefriend" to animate... and they did a godawful job. Studio Nue animated most of the "important" episodes, and their quality was noticably better), and a much better orchestral score (thanks again to the Maestro Kentaro Haneda). Although some people considered it just a two-hour re-write of the original plot with updated visuals (the Valkyries gained some noticable upgrades, and the UNS Macross was shown with the ARMD platforms docked, as they intended to do in episode 3 of the original series) most people consider DYRL a "movie within the timeline" which is to say DYRL was a movie shown to people around the 2030s of the Macross universe about the events that occurred during Space War I. That is an discussion for another time though ;)

Rei mentioned the trend to go less towards storyline and more towards fan-service, jpop, and fancy mechs... the sad fact is this trend is industry-wide ("Ghost in the Shell" for example... the original movie was so incredibly well put together, the TV show that came later was a cop-out by comparison, and not nearly as "dark". "Gundam SEED" and it's off-shoots followed the same pedigree.)

The sad fact is, anime isn't what it once was. You just don't get storytellers with the skill and talent of guys like Hayao Miyazaki ("Spirited Away", 2002 academy award for best animated feature. A distinction that I do not believe has been repeated since). Masamune Shirow (BEFORE GitS-SAC, which is a considerable nose-dive from his earlier stuff ) Or Yoshiyuki Tomino (most everything early gundam) Nowadays it's all about pre-pubescent girls, big boobs, and flashy technology... A solid storyline has taken a back seat. I consider the videogame world as falling victim to the same trends (back in the 1980s and early 1990s, you didn't have the kind of graphics capabilities we have today, so videogame companies relied on solid gameplay and a good story to sell a game)

Having said that, not ALL anime of today is crap, as I've mentioned earlier "Zipang" and "Sunabozou" (recently released as "Desert Punk" here in the US) are both fairly recent series that are well-played), it's just getting a lot harder to separate the wheat from the chaff. Everyone has their own likes and dislikes... but in my honest opinion, the anime fans to today are settling for far less than what they could be getting. Then again, I guess bouncy boobs and pre-teen girls are what everyone wants these days.

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I wouldn't say that Stand Alone Complex is entirely bad. The first season, in comparison with the second season is total manure. I really like that in GiG-2 they made Motoko's appearance a bit more modest, and the best part was that she herself was emotionally tied to the plotline. The movies were good, even Solid State Society, though i did fall asleep during Innocence once. anyway, back to point, I have to agree that most animation is falling in quality. Meer Cambel, while a deep character, is for all intents and purposes the show's slu* (and an emotional prostitute), and Seed/Seed Destiny is incomperably glossy when placed next to Gundam Wing.

Mezzo DSA? I only watched it in hopes that it would get better. Mikura is a large-breasted fourteen year old with little of the bad-assedness that was so cool about her in Mezzo Forte. She even only shot like, two people! They kept the naked robot breasts, but lost the violence?

What do people think think though, of Sentou Yousei Yukikaze? I got the plotline after the second watch-through, and though it impressed my dad he had absolutely no idea what exactly was going on. Personally I love it.

Edited by sv51macross

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What do people think think though, of Sentou Yousei Yukikaze? I got the plotline after the second watch-through, and though it impressed my dad he had absolutely no idea what exactly was going on. Personally I love it.

I've met maybe one person that liked it. I was left feeling like it could've been so much more. It met that formula that I discussed a while back that just screamed "cookie-cutter" to me. You had Fukai, who was your requisite anti-social, the super-unstoppable AI... you had Bukhar, the completely misunderstood friend of Fukai (who's only saving grace was to be dubbed by Dan Warren in the english version).

Glad you liked it, I was less than impressed.

Again with Mikura... Young girls, overly jiggly boobs... beyond that, It'll take a lot more than attitude to save that series. And whatever can be said about SAC is that it is a mere shadow of Shirow's earlier works (go watch New Dominion Tank Police, or the original Appleseed, etc).

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Again with Mikura... Young girls, overly jiggly boobs... beyond that, It'll take a lot more than attitude to save that series. And whatever can be said about SAC is that it is a mere shadow of Shirow's earlier works (go watch New Dominion Tank Police, or the original Appleseed, etc).

What I liked about Mezzo Forte was how it was kinda funky and funny while being really violent, and the way Momomi behaved was the icing on the cake. I actually have the director's cut subbed, and am trying to edit out the sex scenes from it. The TV series just took Mikura's childish trends too far and exaggerated the strange elements (and there were fewer guns (in the DSA) too!)

I haven't seen the original Appleseed (Dunan's...attire is kinda off-putting) but from seeing the remake, I can say I would gladly trade the animation for another half hour and a less-cheese-ially developed plot.

And Yes, Yukikaze could have been better...but after watching bits of Area 88 on Youtube, I'm unsure of any other aviation-related animes.

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Funny, GiTS:SAC is one of my more favorite recent drama series.

Recently, my faves have been all comedies: Detroit Metal City, Kamen no Maid Guy, Astro Fighter Sunred, and such. The drama which most recently really grabbed my attention is the spooky Higurashi no Naki Koro Ni/When They Cry, which was a great horror/fantasy series. Rental Magica was another great one. I was surprised how much I ended up liking Red Garden. I didn't get the whole Haruhi Suzumiya craze.

Someone tried to get me into Tytania, which is supposed to be very old-school space opera, but it just didn't grab me.

Other than that, I recently, uhm, acquired, the entire second part of Voltron - you know, the part where they make Voltron out of, like a hundred and fifty little cars and stuff instead of the lions. I don't think I've seen that since it first ran in the 80s. Very enjoyable.

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A fair number of my favorite series of the last few years aren't anime originals, but adaptations of novels or light novels. To wit:

Full Metal Panic

Shakugan no Shana

Banner of the Stars/Crest of the Stars

The Slayers

Zero no Tsukaima

Tytania

Saiunkoku no Monogatari

Spice and Wolf (or Wolf and Spice)

Suzumiya Haruhi no Yuutsu

I fact, there are probably more that I'm missing right now... All of the above were well worth the time it took to watch them, though. They range in length in anime form from thirteen eps (Spice and wolf) to two double-length seasons (Saiunkoku), with some of them still ongoing to boot...

SP

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Most anime are based on existing graphic novels or Manga. Very few arent actually.

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My gut instinct says you're wrong, but I don't have the energy to gather enough of a statistical sampling to argue the point. I'll agree that *truly* original anime (i.e. with existing material to base designs or storyline from) aren't in the majority. Aside from manga and novels, there are also games and toy lines to consider. In some cases, tracking down which version came first of manga/anime/novel/game/toy is also a non-trivial task, especially nowadays when it's all one package...

SP

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I love GitS:SAC, my favorite anime series ...

I've been a big fan of Dominion: Tank Police and New Dominion: Tank Police for almost 20 years ...

"New", being a tv series, is much more 'tame' than Dominion ...

Guys, check out > PLANETES <, a very good series from a few years ago ...

Gregg

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I love GitS:SAC, my favorite anime series ...

Gregg

I think we've all gotten that by now Gregg. :thumbsup:

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My favorite anime usually tends to be whatever anime I'm currently watching, then in between it reverts to a tie between GITS SAC and Gundam Wing. It was Strike Witches (Don't judge me!) and now its Shikabane Hime. Yes, I am a shallow person.

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I think we've all gotten that by now Gregg. B)

:lol: :doh::thumbsup:

Gregg

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BTW, it amazes me that people who complain about how "Anime is all about the b00bz these days" will hold up Shirow, and especially GITS and Appleseed, as examples of how good things used to be. If any purported non-hentai mangaka needed to reign in his gratuitious nudity impulses, Shirow would be at the top of the list in my book. (Not that I think this is at all neccessary, as I quite like his art. It's usually just completely unneccessary for the enjoyment of the plot, though...)

SP

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