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Army_Air_Force

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About Army_Air_Force

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    Century Bombers CO

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    http://www.sacarr.co.uk
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    Male
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    Washington, UK
  • Interests
    R/C Large Model Aircraft, Military Vehicles, Railroad Modelling, WW2 History, Astronomy

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  1. Army_Air_Force

    Max Holste Broussard 1/72 Scratch Built Masters & Models

    The only progress this week has been priming and filling.
  2. Army_Air_Force

    Max Holste Broussard 1/72 Scratch Built Masters & Models

    Friday afternoon was spent filling and sanding the cowl. The postman also brought the Broussard decals that JamesP ( from Britmodeller ) kindly sent me. While these decals won't be used on the first two models of the Breighton based Broussard, they are a useful reference source for the size of some of the smaller markings and stencils. This should help with the graphics for my own decals.
  3. Army_Air_Force

    Max Holste Broussard 1/72 Scratch Built Masters & Models

    The rear part of the cowl was then sanded to the brass template and then some P38 filler carefully applied to allow the front and rear to be blended. This will probably take two or three applications to sand and fill any low spots. It's going to require some careful sanding. I couldn't proceed until the filler cured, and as it was close to school chucking out time, I packed up and went to collect my daughter, but not before another feel good picture. I was very happy with the way it was looking.
  4. Army_Air_Force

    Max Holste Broussard 1/72 Scratch Built Masters & Models

    The front section of cowl was cut away, and sanded to the desired depth. The rear part of the resin, that was in the lathe jaws, was also trimmed, and the brass template from the front fuselage attached with cyano to the back face. The front piece was then carefully lined up and glued back on.
  5. Army_Air_Force

    Max Holste Broussard 1/72 Scratch Built Masters & Models

    A high pressure over Europe has brought Mediterranean weather to the UK for a few days. With a Summer like day in mid April, I decided I'd go out and catch some Sun this morning - not sun bathing, but photon catching in Hydrogen Alpha wavelengths of light!!! While the Sun is deep into the low period of its 11 year activity cycle, there was still some interesting prominence activity, with the lower right one being about three times taller than the Earth's diameter! By the time I finished and packed up, it was time for a quick lunch, before heading to the building bench. I decided to tackle the odd shaped cowl next. It starts our round at the front, and transitions to a rectangular section with rounded corners like the front of the fuselage. I began by turning a rough blank out of model board. The centre was drilled out and the outside, turned down with a combination of the lathe tool and freehand work with a scalpel and sanding block. A styrene template was periodically offered up to the resin cowl to check on the profile. It took a while, reducing the shape by fractions of a millimetre at a time.
  6. Army_Air_Force

    Max Holste Broussard 1/72 Scratch Built Masters & Models

    The last job of the day was the fin/rudder assembly. I decided I only needed to make one pattern which would be used for both sides. Two pieces of thin modelboard were glued together into a thin sheet. The glue joint gave the piece a centre line to work to. This was wet sanded on both sides until the desired thickness was reached. The outline on the drawing was extended and the modelboard placed over the drawing to mark out its size. The taper was marked and cut first, then the height cut before sanding the radii on the top and bottom of the fin. Once the basic shape was sanded, the rudder taper was sanded along with the leading edge curve. The top and bottom of the fin and rudder were the last to be rounded off as seen from the front.
  7. Army_Air_Force

    Max Holste Broussard 1/72 Scratch Built Masters & Models

    Here's the windscreen sanded. The tailplane seat filler was sanded and some acrylic putty added to the joint on the tail fairing joint. This was sanded as seen here, and a further layer of filler added and again sanded.
  8. Army_Air_Force

    Max Holste Broussard 1/72 Scratch Built Masters & Models

    A little while later, the wing was popped off the cabin. The main wing had been used to make the seat as it's longer span was more accurate to align squarely. When the centre wing panel was fitted to the cabin top, it was a perfect fit on the filler. I guess my wing section sanding was pretty accurate! The excess filler at the top of the screen and around the sides was wet sanded a little while later, and the aircraft components placed together for a photo. Now it's really starting to looking like a Broussard.
  9. Army_Air_Force

    Max Holste Broussard 1/72 Scratch Built Masters & Models

    The fuselage was returned to the jig, along with the tailplane, this time with the cockpit fitted. More P38 filler was mixed and applied to the main wing seat. The main wing panel was pressed into place on the filler. It was checked from above that it was square to the centre line, and checked from the front that is was parallel to a steel rule resting on the top of the tailplane.
  10. Army_Air_Force

    Max Holste Broussard 1/72 Scratch Built Masters & Models

    While the tail filler was curing, I began to sand out the main wing seat, starting with a thin slice through the bandsaw, followed by hand sanding. The tailplane was finally popped off, leaving a nice smooth, perfectly aligned seat on the fuselage master.
  11. Army_Air_Force

    Max Holste Broussard 1/72 Scratch Built Masters & Models

    Out came the P38 car body filler next, and a small amount was mixed up and pasted onto the tailplane seat. The tailplane was then pressed down onto the fuselage, squeezing out the excess filler, being careful to make sure it was aligned side to side. The jig took care of the other alignments. A short coffee break gave the filler enough time to cure to the 'green' stage and I was then able to lift the fuselage from the jig. I left the tailplane attached for a while longer for the filler to fully harden. The excess filler would be trimmed off later. The fuselage tailcone also needed a bit of filler to blend it with the rest of the fuselage.
  12. Army_Air_Force

    Max Holste Broussard 1/72 Scratch Built Masters & Models

    Out came the bandsaw and the scrap wood, and I made a jig to hold the fuselage and tailplane square. The tailplane was wrapped in one layer of sellotape to give it a smooth, non-stick surface.
  13. Army_Air_Force

    Max Holste Broussard 1/72 Scratch Built Masters & Models

    After the tail was sanded to shape, I began to sand out the tailplane seat. It would be impossible to sand by eye and get a good fit, but I had a plan. Instead a trying for a good fit, I sanded the seat a bit deeper than needed. I also needed to create a little fuselage just ahead of the tail. The fairing on top of the tail will be added later.
  14. Army_Air_Force

    Max Holste Broussard 1/72 Scratch Built Masters & Models

    Once the tail block was secure, I began cutting it down, first with the bandsaw to get the excess off, then with 80 grit sand paper. At present, the block has been cut to the correct length, but it hasn't been fully sanded to blend in with the rest of the fuselage. Once that is done, the next stage will be cutting the wing and tail seats.
  15. Army_Air_Force

    Max Holste Broussard 1/72 Scratch Built Masters & Models

    I also did some work on the fuselage. The two parts of the cabin were glued together, and then they were bolted to the rear and lower fuselage with a plastic bag trapped between the upper and lower parts. This allowed a little thin cyano to be wicked into the rear and lower fuselage joint. The upper and lower parts then had their joints sanded and then separated. Three small blocks were then glued together to form the rear fuselage under the tailplane area. The joints between these blocks formed centre lines which were aligned with those on the main fuselage. They were carefully clamped and thin cyano run into the joint to attach the tail piece.
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