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CF104

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About CF104

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    Starfighter Nut
  • Birthday 03/31/1966

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    Male
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    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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    R/C flying, music and recording. P/C sims. Licensed Aircraft Mechanic currently working on the B757-200, Airbus A300/A310 and have 10+ years Herk experience. Also worked on the B727, B737, CT-114, CT-133 and CF-104.

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  1. CF104

    F-15C/E exhausts 1/48 by KA models

    In USAF service, all F-15's had their Turkey Feathers removed in the early 80's. It would be correct to build an F-15A without them after this time. Cheers, John
  2. CF104

    F-104 white wings - alternative reason

    I've been collecting F-104 reference materials for the better part of 30 years and this is the first instance of thermocouples installed in the wing to control the engine to prevent overheating the airframe that I've heard of. I can't find any reference to this supposed system in any of my F-104A materials which includes both Maintenance T.O.s and the Structural Repair Manual. Also the J79-GE-3B manuals have no reference to this system. The only thing controlling the VSV system on the -3B is the Main Fuel Control and an external input from the gunfire system to close the vanes when the gun is firing. The majority of the structure on the F-104 is 7075-T6 with high carbon steel forgings in the center fuselage/engine bay area. There is modest use of 2024-T4 in some fairings and internal structures. The aft fuselage is primarily Stainless Steel structure with some Titanium skins. There really is no chance to overheat the aluminum structure as the time the F-104 can spend at Mach 2.0 is very limited. Both 2024-T4 and 7075-T6 have very similar thermal strength properties and are mechanically stable to well above 130 deg C. As far as the F-104 is concerned, it's the engine that is the speed limiting factor at altitude and high mach numbers. The compressor front case is made of cast magnesium and that's why the SLOW light comes on at 121 deg C Inlet Temp. I Would be interested in hearing the details from the other post if the person remembers them. Regardless this is a bit far off course for this forum so I'll take this back to the Research Corner. Cheers, John
  3. CF104

    Starfighter experts needed

    I would say that's a very 'alternative reason' but totally incorrect. The source has no idea what they are talking about and has no factual content or references. There is a lot of misinformation in that post regarding the design and implementation of the J79 into the F-104 airframe. At no point were thermocouples installed in the wings in an effort to control the VSV system on the J79 due to airframe heating. The actual limiting factor for the airframe heating is the J79 engine front frame and generator cooling air temperature and not the aluminum structure. The effects of high speed heating on the F-104 were well understood by Lockheed engineers and the Aluminum used in the structure was more than sufficient to cope with this heating. As for Eglin AFB accidents, there were only 4 F-104's lost at Eglin over the years and only one was a takeoff accident when the engine failed. Interesting F-104 accident list. http://www.i-f-s.nl/F-104 Accidents/ Eglin AFB accident list. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_aircraft_accidents_at_Eglin_Air_Force_Base The majority of early F-104 accidents were due to engine failure/fire, hydraulic failure or electrical failure. Cheers, John
  4. CF104

    F-104 white wings - alternative reason

    I would say that's a very 'alternative reason' but totally incorrect. The source has no idea what they are talking about and has no factual content or references. There is a lot of misinformation in that post regarding the design and implementation of the J79 into the F-104 airframe. At no point were thermocouples installed in the wings in an effort to control the VSV system on the J79 due to airframe heating. The actual limiting factor for the airframe heating is the J79 engine front frame and generator cooling air temperature and not the aluminum structure. The effects of high speed heating on the F-104 were well understood by Lockheed engineers and the Aluminum used in the structure was more than sufficient to cope with this heating. As for Eglin AFB accidents, there were only 4 F-104's lost at Eglin over the years and only one was a takeoff accident when the engine failed. Interesting F-104 accident list. http://www.i-f-s.nl/F-104 Accidents/ Eglin AFB accident list. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_aircraft_accidents_at_Eglin_Air_Force_Base The majority of early F-104 accidents were due to engine failure/fire, hydraulic failure or electrical failure. Cheers, John
  5. CF104

    RCAF F-101 Colours

    One can't use either of those Voodoos for accurate colour/markings research. 101060 was repainted in the mid/late 90's by SPAR Aviation Services to mount on the pole in front of the museum. The general colour was matched by sample and is very close but not perfect. The major markings and warning information were applied but it's missing the majority of it's servicing stencils. How do I know? I was involved with this repaint when I was employed at SPAR and volunteering at the museum. 17425 is actually 101032 (second batch) which was modified to look like a first batch CF-101 by removing the IR sensor ball and fairing it over and painted over all aluminum lacquer. The serial number, 17425, is fictitious and is a tribute to 425 squadron. The first batch CF-101's were natural metal with a small area of aluminum lacquer on the lower fuselage that ran from the nose gear doors to the forward edge of the engine bay access doors. Cheers, John
  6. CF104

    RCAF F-101 Colours

    As far as the CF-101 paint schemes go there were 3 major base color variants and several marking variations. 1. The original base color scheme was bare metal with colored markings. 2. The second variation was an aluminum lacquer base scheme with color markings. 3. The last base scheme was the CF-101 Voodoo grey which was introduced in 1980. This was a Canadian specification and the number is AA92-A-312 Alumigrip light grey enamel which is not the same as FS 16473 ADC Grey. This scheme also used what is called the symmetrical era markings. Model Master used to make a very good enamel color for the CF-101 Voodoo grey which is no longer available. Cheers, John
  7. CF104

    Aires cockpit for Hasegawa 1/48 F-104C

    Fitting the Aires F-104 cockpit into the Hasegawa kit is a chore. They are great looking cockpits but suffer from the Aires fit problem. It also doesn't come with the canopy demister tubes. My best luck has been with the Cutting Edge F-104C cockpit, CEC48252, which is available from time to time on eBay and has the canopy demister tubes. Next would be the Avionix/Blackbox pit which also fits well but needs a bit more care than the Cutting Edge pit, doesn't have the demister tubes and is hard to find. I also recommend the Cutting Edge F-104C Upgrade Set, CEC48265, as it corrects the air conditioning air inlet and gives you a few other goodies to improve the kit. Cheers, John
  8. CF104

    1/48 Tamiya F-14D

    I didn't know there was a difference in the front glare shield from the early A to late A? Cheers, John
  9. Here's a pdf that should help you. Tips for Scales Cheers, John
  10. Appears to be an LEM Kit from the Ukraine. www.lemkits.com Not into bidding on eBay when he has a web store. Although the P-59 is not listed there. Cheers, John
  11. CF104

    Kinetic F-16s.... a call to Raymond.

    I had a look at my Polish F-16D Block 52+ and it has the same short shot on the V-Stab. I'll be sending Kinetic a service request to replace this part. Thanks for bringing this to our attention. Cheers, John
  12. CF104

    Tornado control stick 1:1

    Actually the F-4 grip and the F-104 grip are not exactly the same. The F-104 grip has the hand rest on the right lower side. This was removed on the F-4 due to ejection seat interference. Cheers, John
  13. CF104

    F-101B soon from Kitty Hawk

    Actually the flaps only move back about 12" with the leading edge of the flap moving up into the flap well when fully extended. They do not move to the wing edge. That being said, the instructions do tell you to mount them in the incorrect location though. Cheers, John
  14. CF104

    AMK 1/48 F-14!!!

    Thanks for the clarification on the abort switch. The safety interlocks are the launch bar proximity switch which senses if the launch bar is fully retracted after launch. If it's not fully retracted the "LAUNCH BAR" advisory annunciator illuminates and nose gear retraction is inhibited. Cheers, John
  15. CF104

    AMK 1/48 F-14!!!

    WARNING!! Non-AMK technical related content. Hi Tracy, What you say is correct for the F/A-18 but not the F-14. The launch bar on the F-14 can only be lowered with the nose gear in the Kneel position and the nose gear deflected 10 degrees off center or manually by the launch crew. The launch bar can only be retracted one of 3 ways. Mechanically by nose gear strut extension after launch, by the launch bar ABORT switch or by extending the nose gear strut with the Kneel/Off/Extd switch. There is no Launch Bar Extend/Retract switch in the F-14. Once the jet goes into tension on the shuttle, the pilot carry's on with the launch without further interaction with the launch bar unless there is a launch abort. There is a safety interlock after CV launch that prevents gear retraction if the launch bar doesn't retract. Cheers, John
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