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PeepingBear

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About PeepingBear

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    sceptical chymist and secret kit hoarder

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    Male
  • Location
    Muenster, Germany
  • Interests
    Helicopters, modern Bundesluftwaffe, some WW II, mostly 1/48

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  1. PeepingBear

    1/48 F-105 upgrade needs

    Hobby Boss' F-105? Well what about the missing centerline pylon for the typical load of one MER with six M117 bombs? OK it is a relatively easy scratch build, but it WOULD fill a gap. Regards Ian
  2. PeepingBear

    CH 53G decals

    Hi Midnightprowler, are you looking for the old Revell decals (USMC field greem over all with black markings, see here for an example: Box cover pic). I think I have that set available, but I will need some time to check this as it is in deep storage. If there is none available "over there", I could send you that set as a letter from old Europe. Best regards Ian (janteipel at web dot de)
  3. PeepingBear

    Superb Display - Solo Turk

    Congratulations for a very well built F-16 model with a stunning display! Ian
  4. Is ist just me or did anybody else noctice that the kit's parts for the scissors just above the rotating swashplate are a mirror image of reality? That seems the reason why the mast assembly of the Q+D build by KH looks strange. But I think it is an easy job to fix this: A cut in the joint and then reglue the parted plastic with the horizontal parts inverted. A somewhat tougher cookie is the missing adjustment for the hell hole roof (= base for the main rotor transmission), I think this should be glued at a slight angle forward-downward, because the whole MR assembly is tilted toward the front. Hopefully one of the Huey tech experts around here can shed some light on this. These issues notwithstanding I really like the new KH Huey. BTW, the .50 cal M3 are a unexpected bonus, having the longer slitted flash hider. Very good for an OH-58D or a German Navy Lynx. Thanks for being a trailblazer with your build, Ray
  5. PeepingBear

    1/48 Mirage IIIS/DS decals

    Nose for IIIS variant... Hi to all, that nose was produced by Kinetic: Three "non-recon" noses were originally shown: a bulgy cone for the French "Cyrano" radar, a "straight and narrow" for non-radar Mirage III versions (5, V), and a less bulgy curved cone for the Hughes-Radar equipped Swiss variant. Model Peek's thread on ARC shows all nose styles, alas only the rece nose and the Cyrano nose are in the original release K48050. For a deeper discussion about the parts for a Swiss Mirage, please see my post on Britmodeller. So we have to build the RS first and wait for the Swiss chasseur. Cheers Ian
  6. PeepingBear

    Eduard Bundesfighter

    Hi everybody! It seems more attractive to combine a HAS F-104 kit with Daco's F-104 enhancenment set (which is massive!). Without extra decals, the price for the basic kit and the Daco set is about the same as Eduard's offer. Eduard's previous beefed-up kits were really more attractive than this "Bundesfighter". Just my tuppence... Cheers to all Ian
  7. PeepingBear

    JA37Di Viggen

    Hi Janne! You wrote it crystal clear! I am very happy if smaller kit producers leave the boring path and offer something really new. If they are successful, chances rise that other exotic aircraft types get "kitted" - good for all of us. But the Viggen project seems like a misjudgement of market facts. At current prices, only afficionados and modelling nerds will buy Tarangus' viggen - even I am still really tempted... But with prices adjusted to the kit's quality, they could expect to "own" and saturate the Viggen market. Ah, back to modelling... Cheers Ian
  8. PeepingBear

    JA37Di Viggen

    Very instructive building thread! Thank you Janne for showing us your knowledgeable and crafty build of the new Trangus kit. I think many of us had really high hopes for this kit and now we see it's weak points it may be a bit discouraging, especially considering the price tag. (Just imagine the brutal bashing this kit would receive were it done and marketed by one of the younger chinese companies...) On the other hand YOU show us how satisfying and nice this model can be if built with some TLC. Tarangus should thank you for your efforts! Right now I am not as sure as I was a few moths ago if I should buy this kit. But this project of yours will be helpful anyhow, even if I stay with my old ESCI Viggen. I enjoy each new post in this thread. Keep up the good work! Best regards from Germany, Ian PS: Happy new year to everybody out there!
  9. PeepingBear

    CO2 set ups, got a question....

    URGENT SAFETY ADVICE Being a chemist may I please repeat and fortify some of the safety hints that have come up in this thread: Reasons why you do not want to use Oxygen or Nitrogen: 1. Pure Oxygen gas at higher pressure will spontaneously and explosivley ignite many organic solvents, oils and fats. NO extra spark or flame needed! Open the pressure reducing valve a tad too far and WOOF / BANG - there you go! With the solvent mixtures used in paint you cannot predict the "touchiness", but it might add some "spice" to boring painting tasks... [*] 2. High pressure bottles with Oxygen or Nitrogen MUST be secured against toppling over and shearing off of the valve! If the pressure cylinder topples and the valve gets shorn off (NOT an improbable risk!), you will have a veritable missile. This is why: O2 and N2 bottles contain gaseous, not liquid matter. If the container is opened, the content does not have to boil off rather slowly but simply expands "rocket-fast". [**] Gas bottles "going ballistic" can easily punch through walls, bigger bottles may even go through several brick and mortar walls, now please think about the average US american house... 3. Ecologically CO2 might be worse than N2. (But how many kilos do you think you might use in your modelling life? Really!). Toxicologically nitrogen and carbon dioxide are simply asphyxiating gases, making you drowsy quickly and leaving you helpless until "The End". This is REALLY a risk if you work in a basement, because CO2 is heavier than air and will pool in low areas. [***] Spraying paint, you should aerate your workspace well anyway. To summarize: Carbon dioxide is the safest to use, keep the valve upwards-oriented to prevent liquid CO2 from entering the valve and hose (it might form solid CO2 "snow" there, causing temporary failure). Oxygen is a NO-GO as a propellant gas for organic solvents. Pressure bottles must be checked and certified in all civilized countries for safety reasons. Go calculate and compare the costs for several years of use with some bottle exchanges (instead of simple refills). HTH Ian PS: Happy Holidays 2014/15 to everyone! ------- [*] BTW, it is a cool scientist's prank to pour liquid oxygen into a glowing coal barbecue, look for this on youtube... [**]More info: The critical temperature for N2 is -147 °C and for O2 it is -118 °C. At higher temperature both substances stay gaseous no matter how high the pressure may be. Yes, the expanding gas will usually cool (Joule-Thomson effect) with this method gases can be cooled below T(crit) and thus condensed to liquid state. But this will not really slow your "accidential missile". [***] Even more info: A higher carbon dioxide concentration in your blood will urge you to breathe (you do not really feel the lack of oxygen but the excess of CO2 in your blood) BUT if your surroundings have a too high CO2 concentration (like accidentially in a winery cellar), you might loose control, maybe even consciousness, faster than you feel "out of breath" and can leave the danger area. If you want to know more, Jennings will surely be able to explain this even better.
  10. PeepingBear

    Revell-Germany 1/48 Bell UH-1

    Hi from Germany! You will find several discussion threads on this topic, here on ARC and also on other forums. As beloved as the Huey is, some threads are quite comprehensive. One can end up with the feeling that there is no really "on par" 1/48 or 1/72 scale Huey model kit. I understand that emotion, the Huey being THE icon of the Vietnam war and a workhorse for over 30 years in so many countries around the world. Still Italeri's UH-1 is not bad, even the older ESCI kit will build into a good replica with the application of knowledge, research (thank the WWW) and classic modelling skills. The most highly visible errors of the Revell (née Italeri) UH-1D kit are the wider chord main and AT-rotor blades (correct for the Bell 212 / UH-1N that Italeri produced first). Both can be corrected with a few knife cuts, file strokes and patience. The baggage compartment in the tail boom should be puttied away as well. BTW for a latter years German UH-1D you will need to make the trapezoid fibre reinforced MR-blades, narrowing the kit MR-blades will only give you the older style metal blades. Furthermore any Huey model will highly and visibly profit from enhancement of the rotor mast subsystem, I think it is not really possible to inject these details correctly in 48th scale. Italeri's 3D instrument panel is modeled after the 212 with twin engine controle, but IMHO this is not a really disturbingly visible error. The pilot's seats are wrong for a German variant. Look for Burkhard Domke's walk around of a German Huey. If you are really into it, you will find several smaller errors and weaknesses (e.g. the to fat wire strike protective tubing, also an issue of injection limits). Just do it! There are never enough Huey models around! HTH Ian
  11. WOW! If this becomes reality, you'll have closed one of the really important gaps. Your CAD looks quite promising. Hoping for the best, but even if your kit comes out as average 21st century quality, it will find its market. So many NATO coutries flew this bird, so many attractive schemes... Three cheers for you! Ian
  12. PeepingBear

    Fuels tanks on Apaches

    Hi all! I am pleased I could help. The WWW is really a boon for knowledge gathering if we combine our individual smaller contributions. I would like to build "Rigor Mortis", but I have a set of TwoBobs decals for an AH-64A with a superb dragon mouth... Just cool. But TF Normandy was one great opening success of DS. Ah, yes, these are the pods the Dutch use on their 64s. Hard to see, but the pic shows a RNAF (Netherlands) AH-64D. May I ask why your border patrol aircraft need ASE? Best regards Ian
  13. PeepingBear

    Fuels tanks on Apaches

    Hi! The tanks are used on combat missions as well. Most famous might be the "opener" of Desert Storm: Task Force Normandy's AH-64As punching holes in Iraq's air defence system. This was disussed on ARC's helicopter forum, Jonathan Bernstein was very helpful supplying further information: Mission Leader was Then-LTC D. Cody in AH-64A s/n 68977 "Rigor Mortis" with Eddy (of Iron Maiden fame) Tail art. The Apaches were loaded with one tank, 8 Hellfires and 19 Hydras (one pod) plus 30 mm rounds. http://www.defensemedianetwork.com/stories/task-force-normandy-fired-the-opening-shots-of-desert-storm/ I think I saw pictures on the WWW of AH-65Ds in OEF /OIF carrying at least one tank, a load of Hellfires and Hydra 2.75in. FFARs. Google is your friend for further inspiration. Usually the tank is on the port (left) inboard station (presumably because FFARs shot from there will foul the AT-rotor). The tank is the same as used with the Sikorsky H-60 series. Thus you can use one from Italeri's kits. HTH Ian
  14. PeepingBear

    Metal barrel for 1:48 Apache M230 chain gun

    Seconded! Great Idea! I commented the appeal on FB. Let us hope. A quarter scale .50 cal M2 (M3) barrel with flash hiding slits at the end would be nice too, what with all the H-60es, OH-58Ds, H-53es etc around...
  15. PeepingBear

    luftwaffe F-104

    Weathered DayGlo Orange changes into a wild cloudy variety of full colour orange - yellow - off white. I would rather not mix the orange for an overall lighter tint but spray an irregular pattern of thinned yellow or white over the uncut DayGlo. Naturally the weathering is strongest on sun exposed surfaces. Photos on the WWW help getting a feeling for the realy look. HTH Ian
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